Kookaburra Sport
Company typePrivate
Industry
Founded1890; 134 years ago (1890)
FounderAlfred Grace Thompson
HeadquartersMoorabbin, Melbourne, Australia
Area served
Worldwide
Products
Websitekookaburrasport.com.au

Kookaburra is an Australian sports equipment and apparel company based in Melbourne, Australia. The company was founded in 1890 and specializes in manufacturing various equipment used for Australian rules football, cricket, and field hockey. The company is named after the Australian bird Kookaburra. The company manufactures the white ball used in all One-day international matches and the red ball used in Test cricket in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Zimbabwe.

History

The company was founded in 1890 by Alfred Grace Thompson, a migrant harness and saddle maker from United Kingdom. Thompson migrated from Scotland and started manufacturing cricket balls when his livelihood was threatened by the reduction in demand for horse carriages due to the advent of the motor car.[1] The company was founded in Brighton before moving to its current location in Moorabbin on the outskirts of Melbourne, Australia. In the mid-1980s, the company diversified into manufacturing the full range of cricket bats, clothing, footwear and protective equipment.[2]

Products

A Kookaburra cricket ball

The company manufactures Clothing and equipment including bats, balls, stumps, and other equipment.[3] The company manufactures the white ball used in all One-day internationals matches, and the pink and red balls used in Test cricket in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Zimbabwe.[4] The ball is machine-stitched with the seam fading quickly and the thin seam makes it difficult for finger spinners to grip the ball.[5]

Kookaburra hockey balls have been used in all Olympic Games since 1956 and world cup matches since 1984. The company also manufactures sticks and balls for Australian rules football.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ "How the Renowned Kookaburra Ball Retains its Eminence in Cricket". News18. 23 December 2018. Retrieved 7 August 2023.
  2. ^ "Kookaburra tale". Deccan Herald. 23 December 2018. Retrieved 7 August 2023.
  3. ^ "MCC's silly point". The Daily Telegraph. 4 March 2006. Retrieved 7 August 2023.
  4. ^ "The white ball wonder]". Cricinfo. 20 January 2006. Retrieved 7 August 2023.
  5. ^ "Three of a kind: The different balls used in Test cricket". 14 March 2019. Retrieved 7 August 2023.
  6. ^ "The immense popularity of Kookaburra Sport". Cricket World. Retrieved 7 August 2023.