MetLife Stadium, the current home stadium of the New York Giants.
MetLife Stadium, the current home stadium of the New York Giants.

The New York Giants are an American football team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. They are a member of the National Football League (NFL) and play in the NFL's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. In 96 completed seasons, the franchise has won eight NFL championships, including four Super Bowl victories. The Giants have won more than 700 games and appeared in the NFL playoffs 32 times.[1] Though the Giants play home games in East Rutherford, they draw fans from throughout the New York metropolitan area.[2] In 2010, the team began playing in MetLife Stadium, formerly New Meadowlands Stadium.[3][4]

After Tim Mara paid $500 for the franchise,[5] the Giants joined the NFL in the 1925 season and won their first championship two years later. In 1934, the team won its second title, defeating the Chicago Bears in the NFL Championship Game. The Giants won another championship four years later, and made four appearances in the NFL Championship Game from 1939 to 1946, losing each time. New York won its fourth NFL title in 1956, with a 47–7 win over the Bears in the championship game. From 1958 to 1963, the Giants reached the NFL Championship Game five times, but were defeated on each occasion. Following the 1963 season, the franchise did not return to the playoffs until 1981, only finishing .500 or better five times during the postseason drought.

Thirty years after the team's previous NFL title, the Giants were victorious in Super Bowl XXI, winning against the Denver Broncos 39–20 to end the 1986 season. The Giants won their second Super Bowl four years later, defeating the Buffalo Bills 20–19 in Super Bowl XXV. In the 2000 season, New York returned to the Super Bowl, but lost to the Baltimore Ravens 34–7. The 2007 season saw the Giants win their seventh NFL championship at Super Bowl XLII, where they defeated the previously unbeaten New England Patriots 17–14 in a game that is widely considered to be one of the biggest upsets in Super Bowl history.[6][7] The Giants made four consecutive appearances in the playoffs from 2005 to 2008, before an 8–8 record in 2009 caused them to miss the postseason. After missing the playoffs in 2010, they defeated the Atlanta Falcons, Green Bay Packers, and San Francisco 49ers in the 2011 playoffs to reach Super Bowl XLVI, where they defeated the Patriots 21–17. In the most recent season, 2020, the Giants went 6–10 and did not qualify for the postseason.

Table key

Linebacker Lawrence Taylor helped the Giants win two Super Bowls and was the 1986 NFL Most Valuable Player.
Linebacker Lawrence Taylor helped the Giants win two Super Bowls and was the 1986 NFL Most Valuable Player.
BBA Bert Bell Award
Finish Final position in league, division, or conference
Losses Number of regular season losses
NFC POY United Press International NFC Player of the Year
NFL COY National Football League Coach of the Year Award
NFL CPOY National Football League Comeback Player of the Year Award
NFL DPOY National Football League Defensive Player of the Year Award
NFL DROY National Football League Defensive Rookie of the Year Award
NFL MVP National Football League Most Valuable Player Award
NFL OROY National Football League Offensive Rookie of the Year Award
NFL WPMOY Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Award
OT Game was decided in overtime
Pro Bowl MVP Pro Bowl Most Valuable Player Award
Season Each year is linked to an article about that particular NFL season
Super Bowl MVP Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Award
Team Each year is linked to an article about that particular Giants season
Ties Number of regular season ties
UPI NFC ROY UPI NFL-NFC Rookie of the Year
Wins Number of regular season wins

Seasons

NFL champions (1920–1969) NFL champions Super Bowl champions (1966–present) Super Bowl champions Conference champions * Division champions + Wild Card berth # One-game playoff berth ^
New York Giants yearly win–loss records, with division standings, playoff results, award winners, and head coaches
Team
Conference
Division
Finish
Wins
Losses
Ties
Postseason results
Awards
Head coaches
1925 1925 NFL 4th 8 4 0 Bob Folwell
1926 1926 NFL 7th 8 4 1 Doc Alexander
1927 1927 NFL NFL champions 1st 11 1 1 Named NFL Champions (1)[A] NFL champions Earl Potteiger
1928 1928 NFL 6th 4 7 2
1929 1929 NFL 2nd 13 1 1 LeRoy Andrews
1930 1930 NFL 2nd 13 4 0 LeRoy Andrews (11–4)
Benny Friedman & Steve Owen (2–0)
1931 1931 NFL 5th 7 6 1 Steve Owen
1932 1932 NFL 5th 4 6 2
1933 1933 NFL East[B] + 1st + 11 3 0 Lost NFL Championship (at Bears) 23–21
1934 1934 NFL NFL champions East + 1st + 8 5 0 Won NFL Championship (2) (Bears) 30–13 NFL champions
1935 1935 NFL East + 1st + 9 3 0 Lost NFL Championship (at Lions) 26–7
1936 1936 NFL East 3rd 5 6 1
1937 1937 NFL East 2nd 6 3 2
1938 1938 NFL NFL champions East + 1st + 8 2 1 Won NFL Championship (3) (Packers) 23–17 NFL champions Mel Hein (NFL MVP)[8]
1939 1939 NFL East + 1st + 9 1 1 Lost NFL Championship (at Packers) 27–0
1940 1940 NFL East 3rd 6 4 1
1941 1941 NFL East + 1st + 8 3 0 Lost NFL Championship (at Bears) 37–9
1942 1942 NFL East 3rd 5 5 1
1943 1943 NFL East 2nd ^ 6 3 1 Lost Divisional playoff (Redskins) 28–0
1944 1944 NFL East + 1st + 8 1 1 Lost NFL Championship (Packers) 14–7
1945 1945 NFL East T-3rd 3 6 1
1946 1946 NFL East + 1st + 7 3 1 Lost NFL Championship (Bears) 24–14
1947 1947 NFL East 5th 2 8 2
1948 1948 NFL East T-3rd 4 8 0
1949 1949 NFL East 3rd 6 6 0
1950 1950 NFL American[C] 2nd ^ 10 2 0 Lost Conference playoff (at Browns) 8–3
1951 1951 NFL American 2nd 9 2 1
1952 1952 NFL American T-2nd 7 5 0
1953 1953 NFL Eastern 5th 3 9 0
1954 1954 NFL Eastern 3rd 7 5 0 Jim Lee Howell
1955 1955 NFL Eastern 3rd 6 5 1
1956 1956 NFL NFL champions Eastern * 1st * 8 3 1 Won NFL Championship (4) (Bears) 47–7 NFL champions Frank Gifford (NFL MVP)[9]
1957 1957 NFL Eastern 2nd 7 5 0
1958 1958 NFL Eastern * 1st * 9 3 0 Won Conference playoff (Browns) 10–0
Lost NFL Championship (Colts) 23–17 (OT)[10][D] *
Frank Gifford (Pro Bowl MVP)[11]
1959 1959 NFL Eastern * 1st * 10 2 0 Lost NFL Championship (at Colts) 31–16 *
1960 1960 NFL Eastern 3rd 6 4 2 Sam Huff (Pro Bowl MVP)[11]
1961 1961 NFL Eastern * 1st * 10 3 1 Lost NFL Championship (at Packers) 37–0 * Allie Sherman (NFL COY)[12] Allie Sherman
1962 1962 NFL Eastern * 1st * 12 2 0 Lost NFL Championship (Packers) 16–7 * Y. A. Tittle (NFL MVP)[13]
Allie Sherman (NFL COY)[12]
Andy Robustelli (BBA)[14]
1963 1963 NFL Eastern * 1st * 11 3 0 Lost NFL Championship (at Bears) 14–10 * Y. A. Tittle (NFL MVP)[13]
1964 1964 NFL Eastern 7th 2 10 2
1965 1965 NFL Eastern T-2nd 7 7 0
1966 1966 NFL Eastern 8th 1 12 1
1967 1967 NFL Eastern Century 2nd 7 7 0
1968 1968 NFL Eastern Capitol 2nd 7 7 0
1969 1969 NFL Eastern Century 2nd 6 8 0 Alex Webster
1970 1970 NFL NFC East 2nd 9 5 0 Alex Webster (NFL COY)[15]
1971 1971 NFL NFC East 5th 4 10 0
1972 1972 NFL NFC East 3rd 8 6 0
1973 1973 NFL NFC East 5th 2 11 1
1974 1974 NFL NFC East 5th 2 12 0 John Hicks (UPI NFC ROY)[16] Bill Arnsparger
1975 1975 NFL NFC East 4th 5 9 0
1976 1976 NFL NFC East 5th 3 11 0 Bill Arnsparger (0–7)
John McVay (3–4)
1977 1977 NFL NFC East 5th 5 9 0 John McVay
1978[E] 1978 NFL NFC East 5th 6 10 0
1979 1979 NFL NFC East 4th 6 10 0 Ray Perkins
1980 1980 NFL NFC East 5th 4 12 0
1981 1981 NFL NFC East 3rd # 9 7 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 27–21
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 38–24
Lawrence Taylor (NFL DPOY/NFL DROY)[17]
1982[F] 1982 NFL NFC 10th 4 5 0 Lawrence Taylor (NFL DPOY)[17]
1983 1983 NFL NFC East 5th 3 12 1 Lawrence Taylor (NFC POY)[18] Bill Parcells
1984 1984 NFL NFC East 2nd # 9 7 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (at Rams) 16–13
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 21–10
1985 1985 NFL NFC East 2nd[G] # 10 6 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (49ers) 17–3
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 21–0
Phil Simms (Pro Bowl MVP)[11]
1986 1986 NFL Super Bowl champions NFC * East + 1st + 14 2 0 Won Divisional playoffs (49ers) 49–3
Won NFC Championship (Redskins) 17–0
Won Super Bowl XXI (5) (vs. Broncos) 39–20 Super Bowl champions
Lawrence Taylor (NFL MVP/NFC POY/NFL DPOY/BBA)[17][18]
Bill Parcells (NFL COY)[12]
Phil Simms (Super Bowl XXI MVP)[19]
1987[H] 1987 NFL NFC East 5th 6 9 0
1988 1988 NFL NFC East 2nd[I] 10 6 0
1989 1989 NFL NFC East + 1st + 12 4 0 Lost Divisional playoffs (Rams) 19–13 (OT)[20] Ottis Anderson (NFL CPOY)[21]
1990 1990 NFL Super Bowl champions NFC * East + 1st + 13 3 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Bears) 31–3
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 15–13
Won Super Bowl XXV (6) (vs. Bills) 20–19 Super Bowl champions
Ottis Anderson (Super Bowl XXV MVP)[22]
1991 1991 NFL NFC East 4th 8 8 0 Ray Handley
1992 1992 NFL NFC East 4th 6 10 0
1993 1993 NFL NFC East 2nd # 11 5 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 17–10
Lost Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 44–3
Dan Reeves (NFL COY)[12] Dan Reeves
1994 1994 NFL NFC East 2nd 9 7 0
1995 1995 NFL NFC East 4th 5 11 0
1996 1996 NFL NFC East 5th 6 10 0
1997 1997 NFL NFC East + 1st + 10 5 1 Lost Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 23–22 Jim Fassel (NFL COY)[12] Jim Fassel
1998 1998 NFL NFC East 3rd 8 8 0
1999 1999 NFL NFC East 3rd 7 9 0
2000 2000 NFL NFC * East + 1st + 12 4 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 20–10
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 41–0
Lost Super Bowl XXXV (vs. Ravens) 34–7 *
2001 2001 NFL NFC East 3rd 7 9 0 Michael Strahan (NFL DPOY)[23]
2002 2002 NFL NFC East 2nd # 10 6 0 Lost Wild Card playoffs (at 49ers) 39–38
2003 2003 NFL NFC East 4th 4 12 0
2004 2004 NFL NFC East 2nd 6 10 0 Tom Coughlin
2005 2005 NFL NFC East + 1st + 11 5 0 Lost Wild Card playoffs (Panthers) 23–0
2006 2006 NFL NFC East 3rd # 8 8 0 Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Eagles) 23–20
2007 2007 NFL Super Bowl champions NFC * East 2nd # 10 6 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (at Buccaneers) 24–14
Won Divisional playoffs (at Cowboys) 21–17
Won NFC Championship (at Packers) 23–20 (OT)[24]
Won Super Bowl XLII (7) (vs. Patriots) 17–14 Super Bowl champions
Eli Manning (Super Bowl XLII MVP)[7]
2008 2008 NFL NFC East + 1st + 12 4 0 Lost Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 23–11
2009 2009 NFL NFC East 3rd 8 8 0
2010 2010 NFL NFC East 2nd 10 6 0
2011 2011 NFL Super Bowl champions NFC * East + 1st + 9 7 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (Falcons) 24–2
Won Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 37–20
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 20–17 (OT)
Won Super Bowl XLVI (8) (vs. Patriots) 21–17 Super Bowl champions
Eli Manning (Super Bowl XLVI MVP)[25]
2012 2012 NFL NFC East 2nd 9 7 0
2013 2013 NFL NFC East 3rd 7 9 0
2014 2014 NFL NFC East 3rd 6 10 0 Odell Beckham Jr. (NFL OROY)[26]
2015 2015 NFL NFC East 3rd 6 10 0
2016 2016 NFL NFC East 2nd # 11 5 0 Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Packers) 38–13 Eli Manning (Co-NFL WPMOY)[27] Ben McAdoo
2017 2017 NFL NFC East 4th 3 13 0 Ben McAdoo (2–10)
Steve Spagnuolo (1–3)
2018 2018 NFL NFC East 4th 5 11 0 Saquon Barkley (NFL OROY)[28] Pat Shurmur
2019 2019 NFL NFC East 3rd 4 12 0
2020 2020 NFL NFC East 2nd 6 10 0 Joe Judge

Statistics above are current as of January 4, 2021. An em dash (—) indicates that the category is not applicable.

All-time records

New York Giants all-time win–loss records
Statistic Wins Losses Ties Win %
New York Giants regular season record 702 618 33 .531
New York Giants postseason record 24 25 .490
All-time regular and postseason record 726 643 33 .530

Notes

References

General
  • 2008 ESPN Sports Almanac. New York City: ESPN Books. 2007. ISBN 978-1-933060-38-5.
  • 2009 ESPN Sports Almanac. New York City: Ballantine Books. 2008. ISBN 978-0-345-51172-0.
  • "New York Giants: History". CBS Sports. Retrieved September 7, 2008.
  • "New York Giants Coaches". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  • "New York Giants Franchise Encyclopedia". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved November 2, 2008.
  • "New York Giants Playoff History". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved July 24, 2011.
  • NFL 2000 Record & Fact Book. New York City: Workman Publishing Company. 2000. ISBN 0-7611-1982-5.
Specific
  1. ^ "New York Giants Franchise Encyclopedia". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved January 5, 2021.
  2. ^ "Identity crisis: Two states claim NFC champion Giants as their own". CNN Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. January 19, 2001. Archived from the original on February 18, 2008. Retrieved July 2, 2017.
  3. ^ Lapointe, Joe (October 30, 2008). "At Meadowlands Stadium, Lots of Bells and Whistles". The New York Times. Retrieved August 2, 2010.
  4. ^ Ehalt, Matthew (August 23, 2011). "MetLife name unveiled at stadium". ESPN. Retrieved September 13, 2011.
  5. ^ Anderson, Dave (November 26, 2000). "Sports of the Times; When Grange Put the Pros in New York". The New York Times. Retrieved September 11, 2008.
  6. ^ Wilner, Barry (February 3, 2008). "Super Bowl XLII: Giants win an instant classic, beating the 18–0 Pats". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Associated Press. Archived from the original on October 14, 2012. Retrieved September 24, 2008.
  7. ^ a b Layden, Tim (February 11, 2008). "They're History". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 2, 2018. Retrieved July 2, 2017.
  8. ^ Miller, Ted. "Mel Hein". ESPN. Retrieved September 7, 2008.
  9. ^ McEntegart, Pete (February 13, 2008). "New York's Finest". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on July 20, 2008. Retrieved July 2, 2017.
  10. ^ a b "Pro Football History: Greatest game ever played". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on January 10, 2008. Retrieved September 12, 2008.
  11. ^ a b c 2009 ESPN Sports Almanac, p. 261.
  12. ^ a b c d e "Vermeil voted Coach of the Year". CNN Sports Illustrated. February 3, 2000. Archived from the original on October 2, 2000. Retrieved September 23, 2017.
  13. ^ a b "Y.A. Tittle". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on May 11, 2008. Retrieved September 7, 2008.
  14. ^ "Bert Bell Award (Player of the Year) winners". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved September 21, 2008.
  15. ^ "Webster Named Top Coach" (fee required). The New York Times. January 12, 1971. Retrieved September 8, 2008.
  16. ^ "Giants' Hicks Is Rookie of Year; People in Sports" (fee required). The New York Times. December 27, 1974. Retrieved September 8, 2008.
  17. ^ a b c "Lawrence Taylor". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on May 12, 2008. Retrieved September 9, 2008.
  18. ^ a b 2008 ESPN Sports Almanac, p. 280.
  19. ^ Zimmerman, Paul (February 2, 1987). "Killer Giants". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved July 2, 2017.
  20. ^ Litsky, Frank (January 8, 1990). "Rams Win Toss and Game as Giants' Season Ends". The New York Times. Retrieved November 13, 2009.
  21. ^ Habib, Hal (January 30, 2009). "Ottis Anderson toiled for St. Louis Cardinals before becoming a Super Bowl MVP". The Palm Beach Post. Archived from the original on February 1, 2009. Retrieved July 8, 2013.
  22. ^ "Super Bowl XXV: New York 20, Buffalo 19". National Football League. January 28, 1991. Archived from the original on May 9, 2013. Retrieved July 8, 2013.
  23. ^ "Giants' Michael Strahan retiring". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. June 9, 2008. Archived from the original on July 3, 2008. Retrieved September 8, 2008.
  24. ^ Vacchiano, Ralph (January 21, 2008). "Giants beat Packers in overtime, will battle Patriots in Super Bowl XLII". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on December 6, 2008. Retrieved November 13, 2009.
  25. ^ Banks, Don (February 6, 2012). "Giants' Manning takes leap toward Hall of Fame with XLVI win". CNN Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on February 7, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2017.
  26. ^ Smith, Michael David (January 31, 2015). "Odell Beckham Jr. named offensive rookie of the year". NBC Sports. Archived from the original on February 9, 2015. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  27. ^ Smith, Michael David (February 4, 2017). "Eli Manning, Larry Fitzgerald share Man of the Year Award". NBC Sports. Archived from the original on February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017.
  28. ^ Shook, Nick (February 2, 2019). "Saquon Barkley named Offensive Rookie of the Year". National Football League. Archived from the original on March 16, 2019. Retrieved March 18, 2019.
  29. ^ a b "Pro Football History: The First Playoff Game". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on May 22, 2008. Retrieved September 21, 2008.
  30. ^ "History: 1941–1950". National Football League. Archived from the original on May 16, 2008. Retrieved September 21, 2008.
  31. ^ Mosse, David (February 1, 2007). "What if the Colts-Giants game had not been such a classic?". ESPN. Archived from the original on March 25, 2007. Retrieved September 12, 2008.
  32. ^ Pasquarelli, Len (May 18, 2009). "Schedule expansion gaining momentum". ESPN. Retrieved August 10, 2009.
  33. ^ Zimmerman, Paul (November 29, 1982). "Scorecard: The Strike: The Winners. The Losers. And Who Did What To Whom". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on February 15, 2016. Retrieved July 2, 2017.
  34. '^ NFL 2000 Record & Fact Book, p. 291.
  35. ^ Bouchette, Ed (May 21, 2008). "NFL opts out of labor accord". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Archived from the original on June 26, 2008. Retrieved July 2, 2017.
  36. ^ NFL 2000 Record & Fact Book, p. 290.