Lithium oxalate
Lithium oxalate.svg
Names
Other names
Dilithium oxalate, di-Lithium oxalate,[1] oxalic acid dilithium salt[2]
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.008.232 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 209-054-1
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C2H2O4-C.2Li/c3-1(4)2(5)6;;/h(H,3,4)(H,5,6);;/q;2*+1/p-2
    Key: YNQRWVCLAIUHHI-UHFFFAOYSA-L
  • [Li+].[Li+].[O-]C(=O)C([O-])=O
Properties
C
2
Li
2
O
4
Molar mass 102.0 g/mol
Appearance Colorless crystalline solid
Density 2.12 g/cm3
6.6g/100g water
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS07: Exclamation mark
Warning
H302, H312
P264, P270, P280, P301+P312, P302+P352, P312, P322, P330, P363, P501
Related compounds
Related compounds
Calcium oxalate
Sodium oxalate
Magnesium oxalate
Strontium oxalate
Barium oxalate
Potassium oxalate
Beryllium oxalate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Lithium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of lithium metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula C
2
Li
2
O
4
.[3][4] Lithium oxalate is soluble in water and converts to the oxide when heated.[5]

Synthesis

One of the methods of synthesis is the reaction of direct neutralization of oxalic acid with lithium hydroxide:

Properties

The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, cell parameters a = 3.400, b = 5.156, c = 9.055 Å, β = 95.60°, Z = 4.[3]

Lithium oxalate decomposes when heated:

Applications

In pyrotechnics, the compound is used to color the flame red.[6]

References

  1. ^ "553-91-3 | Sigma-Aldrich". Sigma Aldrich. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  2. ^ "di-Lithium oxalate". Merck Millipore. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  3. ^ a b Beagley, B.; Small, R. W. H. (1964-06-10). "The structure of lithium oxalate". Acta Crystallographica. 17 (6): 783–788. doi:10.1107/S0365110X64002079. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  4. ^ Solchenbach, Sophie; Wetjen, Morten; Pritzl, Daniel; Schwenke, K. Uta; Gasteiger, Hubert A. (2018). "Lithium Oxalate as Capacity and Cycle-Life Enhancer in LNMO/Graphite and LNMO/SiG Full Cells". Journal of the Electrochemical Society. 165 (3): A512–A524. doi:10.1149/2.0611803jes. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  5. ^ "Lithium Oxalate". Millipore-Sigma. Retrieved 10 Feb 2022.
  6. ^ Koch, Ernst-Christian (2009). Is it possible to Obtain a Deep Red Pyrotechnic Flame Based on Lithium?. 36th International Pyrotechnics Seminar. doi:10.13140/2.1.1657.0567. Retrieved 15 June 2021.