Noah Syndergaard
Thor headshot.png
Syndergaard with the New York Mets in 2016
Philadelphia Phillies – No. 43
Starting pitcher
Born: (1992-08-29) August 29, 1992 (age 30)
Mansfield, Texas
Bats: Left
Throws: Right
MLB debut
May 12, 2015, for the New York Mets
MLB statistics
(through September 3, 2022)
Win–loss record55–40
Earned run average3.42
Strikeouts862
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Noah Seth Syndergaard[1] (born August 29, 1992), nicknamed "Thor", is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has previously played in MLB for the New York Mets and Los Angeles Angels.

Born in Mansfield, Texas, Syndergaard did not establish himself as a baseball player for Mansfield Legacy High School until his senior year in 2010, where his pitch velocity was bolstered by a growth spurt and weight training regimen. Despite his strong season, Syndergaard's late development meant that he was mostly overlooked by scouts and college coaches, and he received only one college baseball scholarship offer. He turned down Dallas Baptist University, however, when the Toronto Blue Jays selected him in the first round, 38th overall, of the 2010 MLB Draft. After three years in the Blue Jays' farm system, Syndergaard was traded with several other prospects to the Mets in exchange for reigning Cy Young Award winner R. A. Dickey. He made back-to-back appearances in the All-Star Futures Game in 2013 and 2014, but was left off of the Mets' September call-up list.

Syndergaard made his MLB debut in May 2015, following an injury to Dillon Gee. He impressed manager Terry Collins and remained in the starting rotation for the entire season. The Mets appeared that season in the 2015 World Series against the Kansas City Royals, with Syndergaard pitching in the team's only win of the series. The next year, Syndergaard was named a National League (NL) All-Star, and he became one of only five Mets pitchers to strike out 200 batters in one season before the age of 25. His 2017 and 2018 seasons were limited by injuries and illness, but he managed to start in 32 games for the Mets in 2019. During spring training in 2020, Syndergaard was diagnosed with an ulnar collateral ligament injury and had to undergo Tommy John surgery. He returned for only two innings at the end of the Mets' 2021 season, after which he signed a one-year contract with the Angels.

Early life

Syndergaard was born on August 29, 1992, in Mansfield, Texas,[1] to Brad, a horse breeder, and Heidi Syndergaard, a customer service agent for Abbott Laboratories.[2][3] He had limited contact with his two paternal half-sisters, who were 14 and 17 years older than Syndergaard.[2] Although he grew up in an area where American football was the most popular sport, Syndergaard never seriously played the sport. Instead, at the urging of his mother, he began playing baseball around the age of seven.[4] Syndergaard attended Mansfield Legacy High School, where he was classmates with future professional baseball pitcher Tejay Antone.[5] He was smaller than many of his classmates until the summer before his senior year, when a growth spurt brought Syndergaard up to 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m), and a weight training regimen helped bring his pitch velocity from 80 mph (130 km/h) to 90 mph (140 km/h).[4]

In 2010, Syndergaard's senior year of high school, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram named him their Player of the Year. As a pitcher, he had an 11–3 win–loss record and a 1.27 earned run average (ERA), striking out 135 batters and walking only 24 in 88 innings pitched. He was also a successful hitter, batting .409 with 17 doubles, nine home runs, and 41 runs batted in (RBI).[6] Syndergaard's late development, however, meant that he was mostly overlooked by baseball scouts.[7] He had also been injured during his junior season, a time when many college baseball coaches begin looking at prospects. Syndergaard spoke with coaches for Oklahoma, Nebraska, and Baylor, but the only school willing to offer him a scholarship was Dallas Baptist University, where he committed to play for the Patriots as a batter, not a pitcher.[8]

Professional career

Draft and minor leagues (2010–2014)

Syndergaard with the Lugnuts in 2012
Syndergaard with the Lugnuts in 2012

The Toronto Blue Jays of Major League Baseball (MLB) selected Syndergaard in the first round, 38th overall, of the 2010 MLB Draft.[9] He chose to forego his commitment to Dallas Baptist,[10] accepting the Blue Jays' $600,000 signing bonus and beginning his professional baseball career instead.[11] Syndergaard spent the 2010 season with the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League (GCL) Blue Jays, with whom he went 0–1 with a 2.70 ERA in five starts, striking out six batters in 13+13 innings.[12] Syndergaard began the 2011 season with the Bluefield Blue Jays of the Appalachian League, Toronto's other Rookie-level team. After seven appearances, during which he went 4–0 with a 1.41 ERA and struck out 37 batters in 32 innings,[12] he was promoted to the Class A Short-Season Vancouver Canadians of the Northwest League, by which point he could already reach pitch velocities up to 98 mph (158 km/h).[13] In four starts for Vancouver, Syndergaard went 1–2 with a 2.00 ERA,[14] and he received another promotion, this time to the Low-A Lansing Lugnuts of the Midwest League, at the end of August.[15] He made only two appearances that season in Lansing, with no record and a 3.00 ERA, striking out nine batters in as many innings.[12] Between the three teams, Syndergaard finished the 2011 season with a 5–2 record and 1.83 ERA in 13 games (11 starts), and he recorded 68 strikeouts in 59 innings.[12]

Syndergaard returned to the Midwest League again in 2012. Lansing starting pitchers were limited to three innings apiece and paired together: on nights where Syndergaard pitched, he would trade off with Anthony DeSclafani.[16] This "piggyback system" proved effective in keeping all of Lansing's starting pitchers sharp: by May 25, the combined ERA for the Syndergaard-DeSclafani pair was 3.07, and the team had a 2.56 ERA and 23–13 record.[17] Through the first half of the season, Lansing led the Midwest League with 47 wins and a 2.80 team ERA, while the trio of Syndergaard, Justin Nicolino, and Aaron Sanchez had a combined 11–2 record and 1.90 ERA.[18] Playing in 27 games for Lansing, 19 of which were starts, Syndergaard went 8–5 for the season with a 2.60 ERA, and he struck out 122 batters in 103+23 innings.[12]

On December 17, 2012, Syndergaard was traded to the New York Mets as part of a larger deal that allowed Toronto to acquire reigning Cy Young Award winner R. A. Dickey. In addition to Dickey, the Blue Jays acquired catchers Josh Thole and Mike Nickeas in the trade, while the Mets received Syndergaard, Travis d'Arnaud, John Buck, and Wuilmer Becerra.[19] Syndergaard joined the Class A-Advanced St. Lucie Mets of the Florida State League for the 2013 season, forming a starting rotation with Hansel Robles, Luis Mateo, Domingo Tapia, and Jacob deGrom.[20] He went 2–3 with a 2.81 ERA in his first 11 starts for St. Lucie, striking out 59 in 57+23 innings, and was one of three Mets selected for the Florida State League All-Star Game in June.[21] He made one more start for St. Lucie, finishing 3–3 with a 3.11 ERA, before receiving a promotion to the Double-A Binghamton Mets of the Eastern League on June 23.[22] Shortly after his promotion, Syndergaard was invited to the 2013 All-Star Futures Game, where he pitched a scoreless first inning.[23] Syndergaard struggled in his first outing after the All-Star game, allowing three runs on seven hits against the Richmond Flying Squirrels, but recovered quickly, and in 11 starts for Binghamton, he was 6–1 with a 3.00 ERA and struck out 69 batters in 54 innings.[24]

Syndergaard was promoted to the Triple-A Las Vegas 51s for the 2014 season, winning his Pacific Coast League debut by striking out five batters in six innings of an 11–8 victory over the Fresno Grizzlies.[25] His first stretch in Vegas was uneven, with a 4–2 record and 3.92 ERA through May 10, and he made a point to spend the season honing his breaking balls to better handle more advanced batters.[26] After experiencing two injuries in May and June, first a strained pronator teres muscle followed by a sprained shoulder, Syndergaard received another invitation to the All-Star Futures Game. This time, he served as the closer for the US team, earning a save with a scoreless ninth inning to win the game 3–2.[27] Syndergaard's season was overall a success, with a 9–7 record and 4.60 ERA in 26 starts and 133 innings.[12] Additionally, despite pitching primarily in the hitter-advantageous Cashman Field, Syndergaard allowed only six home runs and led the Pacific Coast League with 145 strikeouts. Despite this, he was not chosen as a September call-up for the Mets, who could not give Syndergaard any valuable pitching time in the major leagues.[28]

New York Mets (2015–2021)

2015–2016: World Series appearance and All-Star

Syndergaard with the Mets in 2015
Syndergaard with the Mets in 2015

Syndergaard opened the 2015 season in Las Vegas again, battling food poisoning and a forearm strain that April to post a 3–0 record and 1.82 ERA in his first five starts, as well as 34 strikeouts in 29+23 innings.[29] When starting pitcher Dillon Gee was placed on the disabled list on May 8 with a strained groin, the Mets chose to call up Syndergaard over fellow top prospect Steven Matz.[30] He made his MLB debut on May 12, holding the Chicago Cubs scoreless for five innings before allowing three hits in a row in the sixth, including a two-run home run from Chris Coghlan. He allowed a total of three runs on six hits in the 6–1 loss.[31] Syndergaard's home debut at Citi Field came five days later, and he took the win by pitching six innings in a 5–1 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers.[32] When Gee returned from the disabled list on May 22, Mets manager Terry Collins decided not to move Syndergaard, instead saying that he would keep a six-man starting rotation that made room for both pitchers.[33] This plan was short-lived, and Gee was designated for assignment on June 15, cementing Syndergaard's position in the rotation.[34]

While facing the Philadelphia Phillies on May 27, Syndergaard not only struck out six batters in 7+13 innings, but he went 3-for-3 in at bats, one of which was his first major league home run. In doing so, Syndergaard joined Walt Terrell, Dwight Gooden, and Sid Fernandez as the only Mets pitchers to record three hits, including one home run, in a single game.[35] On July 10, he recorded a career-high 13 strikeouts in eight innings, striking out every member of the Arizona Diamondbacks' starting lineup at least once in the 4–2 win. It was the third time through 11 major league starts that he had reached double-digit strikeouts.[36] He and teammate Lucas Duda were named National League (NL) Co-Players of the Week for the week ending August 3. While Duda recorded seven home runs, Syndergaard struck out an MLB-leading 18 batters in 16 innings of work, bringing his career strikeout total to 100 in only 15 starts.[37] Syndergaard made 24 regular-season starts as a rookie, posting a 9–7 record and 3.24 ERA in the process while striking out 166 batters in 150 innings of work.[38] He finished fourth in voting for NL Rookie of the Year, behind Jung Ho Kang, runner-up Matt Duffy, and winner Kris Bryant.[39]

Syndergaard with the Mets in 2015
Syndergaard with the Mets in 2015

On September 26, after defeating the Cincinnati Reds 10–2 at the Great American Ball Park, the Mets clinched their first NL East title and postseason appearance in nine years.[40] They faced the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 2015 National League Division Series (NLDS), with Syndergaard starting in Game 2. He went 6+13 innings, allowing three runs while striking out nine, and the Dodgers took the game by a score of 5–2.[41] Syndergaard made his first career appearance in relief for Game 5 of the NLDS, pitching a scoreless seventh inning in the 3–2 victory, helping to eliminate the Dodgers and send the Mets to the 2015 National League Championship Series (NLCS).[42] Syndergaard started the second game of that series as well, outdueling Jake Arrieta of the Chicago Cubs by striking out nine batters in 5+23 innings of New York's 4–1 victory.[43] The Mets swept the Cubs in the best-of-seven series, earning their first National League pennant and World Series appearance since 2000.[44] With the Mets down 2–0 in the 2015 World Series against the Kansas City Royals, Syndergaard started Game 3, where he started the game with an intentional pitch to the head of Kansas City shortstop Alcides Escobar in an attempt to rattle the team's offense.[45] He went on to give the Mets their first win of the series, allowing three runs on seven hits but striking out six and leading New York to a 9–3 victory.[46] It was the only game the Mets would win, as the Royals took the World Series in five games.[47]

Syndergaard's first start of the 2016 season came against the Royals, and despite rumors that Kansas City would attempt retribution for the intentional pitch at Escobar,[48] the game transpired without controversy, with Syndergaard striking out nine batters in six scoreless innings of the 2–0 win.[49] Through his first three starts of the season, Syndergaard was 2–0 with a 0.90 ERA and 29 strikeouts, and received Internet attention when a pitch he threw to batterymate Kevin Plawecki had enough momentum to leave an imprint of Plawecki's necklace on his chest.[50] While facing the Dodgers on May 11, Syndergaard recorded home runs against Los Angeles starter Kenta Maeda in both the third and seventh inning, becoming the first MLB pitcher since Micah Owings in 2007 and the second Mets pitcher ever, following Walt Terrell in 1983, to hit two home runs in the same game. The Mets won the game 4–3 and Syndergaard was expected to complete the game, but recent concerns about his elbow health limited him to eight innings and 95 pitches.[51] He was named the NL Player of the Week for the second time in his career on May 23 after striking out 21 batters and allowing no earned runs in 14 innings of work.[52] The following week, Syndergaard was ejected from a Mets–Dodgers game after throwing a pitch behind the back of Chase Utley in a move that was believed to be retribution for a play during the NLDS that had fractured Ruben Tejada's leg. Syndergaard denied the allegations, saying that he had simply lost control of the ball.[53]

Syndergaard mid-All-Star Game weekend festivities in 2016
Syndergaard mid-All-Star Game weekend festivities in 2016

After struggling in a game against the Washington Nationals on June 27, lasting only three innings and squandering a 4–0 lead in the process,[54] Syndergaard revealed that both he and Steven Matz were experiencing bone spurs in their pitching elbow, but he confirmed that it was being treated with anti-inflammatory medication and was often painless.[55] On July 5, Syndergaard was named to the NL roster for the 2016 Major League Baseball All-Star Game,[56] but he could not participate in the game due to arm fatigue.[57] Syndergaard had a difficult stretch after the All-Star break, going winless in seven starts between July 3 and August 17 before pitching 5+23 innings in a 7–5 win against the Arizona Dimaondbacks, during which he recorded another home run of his own.[58] He joined Tom Seaver and Walt Terrell as the only pitchers to hit three home runs in a single MLB season.[59] On September 14, he recorded his 200th strikeout of the season by retiring Danny Espinosa of Nationals. In doing so, the 24-year-old Syndergaard became the fifth Mets pitcher to strike out 200 or more batters before the age of 25.[60]

With Matz, Matt Harvey, and Jacob deGrom injured, Syndergaard was selected to start for the Mets in the 2016 National League Wild Card Game against the San Francisco Giants.[61] The game proved to be a pitchers' duel against the Giants' Madison Bumgarner, with Syndergaard carrying a no-hitter into the sixth inning, but Mets closer Jeurys Familia allowed the only runs of the game when he gave up a three-run home run to Conor Gillaspie in the ninth inning, eliminating the Mets from the postseason.[62] Syndergaard finished the season with a 14–9 record and a 2.60 ERA in 30 starts, and he struck out 218 batters in 183+23 innings. Additionally, his 2.29 fielding independent pitching and 0.5 home runs per nine innings (HR/9) were the lowest among qualifying MLB pitchers.[38] He came in eighth place during voting for the NL Cy Young Award and was 19th in NL MVP voting.[63]

2017–2019: Injury-limited seasons

Syndergaard (right) after suffering an arm injury during a game on April 30, 2017 at Nationals Park
Syndergaard (right) after suffering an arm injury during a game on April 30, 2017 at Nationals Park

Having spent spring training focusing on honing his two-seam fastball, Syndergaard was selected as the Mets' Opening Day starting pitcher for the 2017 MLB season.[64] He took a no decision in the subsequent 6–0 victory over the Atlanta Braves,[65] pitching six scoreless innings before a blood blister popped in his finger, leading to his removal from the game.[66] On May 1, the Mets announced that Syndergaard, who had already suffered a hamstring injury and biceps discomfort in the first three weeks of the season, had partially torn his right latissimus dorsi muscle and was expected to miss at least the next two months of the season.[67] Syndergaard had previously declined to undergo medical imaging for his sore arm, instead taking the mound for his scheduled April 30 start, a 23–5 loss to the Washington Nationals during which he tore the torso muscle.[68] This injury, coupled with a number of other high-profile injuries to Mets stars like Michael Conforto, Zack Wheeler, and Yoenis Céspedes, raised concerns from sports analysts about the team's rigorous training regimen and resistance towards placing players on the disabled list.[69][70][71]

After missing five months of the season, Syndergaard was activated on September 22 to pitch one live, major league inning as part of his rehabilitation process. General manager Sandy Alderson told reporters that Syndergaard's physical rehabilitation was progressing well, and that having the pitcher "back on the mound if only for a moment relatively before the season ends" would help him mentally readjust to major league play.[72] He needed only five pitches to get through the inning, although the Mets lost to the Nationals 4–3 in extra innings. Four of those pitches registered at or above 98 mph (158 km/h). After the game, Syndergaard told reporters that he felt it was important to pitch in a game again before the end of the season after spending so much time and energy on his rehabilitation, because, "[o]therwise, what was I really doing?"[73] He received one more start that season, holding the Philadelphia Phillies scoreless for two innings and 26 pitches and reaching pitch speeds up to 101 mph (163 km/h). After he left, however, the Mets lost the game 11–0 in a Phillies rout.[74] Making only seven appearances in his injury-shortened season, Syndergaard finished the year 1–2 with a 2.97 ERA and struck out 34 batters in 30+13 innings.[38]

Syndergaard with the Mets in 2018
Syndergaard with the Mets in 2018

Declared healthy prior to the start of the season, Syndergaard was given his second consecutive Opening Day start on March 29, 2018.[75] Pitching in six innings of the Mets' 9–4 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals, he became the second pitcher in franchise history to strike out 10 or more batters on Opening Day, following Pedro Martínez's rout of the Cincinnati Reds in 2005.[76] He was 4–1 with a 3.06 ERA and 76 strikeouts in his first 11 starts before going on the disabled list on May 29 with a strained ligament in his right index finger.[77] He returned to the mound on July 13 on a strict pitch count, allowing only one run in five innings of a 4–2 win against the Washington Nationals. His fastball speed reached up to 99 mph (159 km/h), and he recorded an RBI single in the second inning.[78] One week later, Syndergaard was briefly sidelined again after contracting hand, foot, and mouth disease from volunteering at a children's camp during the All-Star break.[79] He was activated on August 1, the same day New York Yankees pitcher J. A. Happ also contracted the virus.[80] On September 2, Syndergaard pitched his first major league complete game, striking out 11 and holding the San Francisco Giants to two hits in a 4–1 victory.[81] After battling a sinus infection in the last week of September, Syndergaard closed the Mets' 2018 season with his first career complete game shutout, a 1–0 victory over the Miami Marlins.[82] He made 25 starts that season, during which he went 13–4 with a 3.03 ERA and struck out 155 batters in 154+13 innings.[38]

Allowing four runs in six innings of what was ultimately an 11–8 win over the Nationals, Syndergaard described his 2019 season debut as "mediocre", blaming a slider that "really sucked".[83] The first month of the season proved difficult for the Mets' entire starting rotation, with a combined 5.35 ERA among Syndergaard, deGrom, Wheeler, Matz, and Jason Vargas. Syndergaard personally had an ERA of 6.35 through his first six starts.[84] His luck changed on May 2, when Syndergaard provided the only run in a 1–0 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. He became the seventh pitcher in MLB history to throw a 1–0 shutout while providing his own home run, and was the first since Bob Welch in 1983.[85] The performance earned Syndergaard NL Player of the Week honors for the week ending May 5, and his ERA dropped to only 5.02 after the shutout.[86] He earned the honor again for the week ending August 4 after two standout performances: after striking out 11 Chicago White Sox in 7+13 innings on July 30, he held the Pittsburgh Pirates to one run on August 4, which dropped his ERA below 4.00 for the first time that season.[87] Syndergaard spent the back half of June on the injured list (renamed from the disabled list that season[88]) with a hamstring injury, but returned at the end of the month for a no decision in a game against the Atlanta Braves.[89] Throughout the season, Syndergaard consistently performed better when pitching to backup catchers Tomas Nido and Rene Rivera rather than starter Wilson Ramos: his ERA was 2.22 in a combined 11 starts with Nido and Rivera, compared to 5.09 in 15 starts with Ramos.[90] In the final stretch of the season, manager Mickey Callaway denied Syndergaard's requests not to pitch to Ramos, who was enjoying an offensive hot streak that the Mets front office believed offset his uneasy relationship with Syndergaard.[91] Syndergard started in 32 games for the Mets in 2019, but posted a 10–8 record and a career-high 4.28 in the process. He also struck out 202 batters in 197+23 innings and led the NL by allowing 94 earned runs.[38]

2020–2021: Tommy John surgery and recovery

Syndergaard with the Mets in 2018
Syndergaard with the Mets in 2018

During spring training in 2020, Syndergaard began to experience elbow discomfort, and he underwent an MRI exam at the suggestion of team athletic trainers when the 2020 MLB season was temporarily shut down due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The exam revealed that Syndergaard had torn the ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow, an injury which required Tommy John surgery to repair.[92] Although the terms of the pandemic-altered 2020 season had not been finalized by the time Syndergaard underwent surgery at the end of March, the earliest that he was expected to return to the Mets was in mid-2021.[93] Syndergaard's decision to undergo an elbow repair surgery during a time when many doctors were canceling elective surgeries and conserving hospital resources for the pandemic was met with some controversy, and the hospital performing the surgery released a statement attesting that they had deemed Syndergaard's procedure to be essential.[94] Syndergaard's teammate Pete Alonso similarly justified the decision, saying, "No athlete wants to go through a serious surgery and grueling recovery process. This surgery is done when it is absolutely necessary for their arm."[95]

While still recovering from surgery, Syndergaard signed a one-year, $9.7 million contract with the Mets on December 22, 2020, the same amount that he would have made had the 2020 season progressed as normal.[96] He began throwing bullpen sessions again in February 2021,[97] and was assigned to the St. Lucie Mets on May 17 to ease back into live competition.[98] On May 27, however, Syndergaard experienced a sudden drop in pitch velocity and elbow discomfort during his minor league outing, and he was shut down for a minimum of six weeks.[99] Exactly three months later, Syndergaard was activated again, pitching one inning for the Brooklyn Cyclones.[100] Nearly two years after his last appearance for the Mets, Syndergaard returned to the major leagues on September 29, pitching a scoreless inning and striking out two batters in a 2–1 defeat of the Marlins. His fastball was recorded at velocities up to 96 mph (154 km/h), significantly faster than it had been in his rehab outings.[101] He made one more appearance that season, pitching one inning in the Mets' season finale against the Atlanta Braves. He allowed two runs in the outing, a home run to leadoff hitter Jorge Soler followed by an RBI single to Austin Riley, and the Braves shut out the Mets 5–0.[102]

Los Angeles Angels (2022)

Although the Mets tendered Syndergaard a qualifying offer for the 2022 MLB season,[103] on November 17, 2021, he signed a one-year, $21 million contract with the Los Angeles Angels, breaking Jered Weaver and C. J. Wilson's record for the highest per-season earnings of any pitcher in franchise history.[104] Syndergaard became the first Angels player since the late Nick Adenhart to wear No. 34, receiving the approval of the Adenhart family.[105] In his Angels debut on April 9, 2022, Syndergaard pitched 5+13 innings while giving up 2 hits and 2 walks, contributing to a shutout of the Houston Astros. He induced 11 groundball outs and struck out only one, the lowest amount of strikeouts in a multi-inning start in his career.[106]

Philadelphia Phillies (2022–present)

On August 2, 2022, the Angels traded Syndergaard to the Philadelphia Phillies in exchange for Mickey Moniak and prospect Jadiel Sanchez.[107]

Pitching style

Syndergaard mid-pitch with the Mets in 2015
Syndergaard mid-pitch with the Mets in 2015

In 2019, Syndergaard's last full season of professional baseball, he carried four different types of pitches: a 98 mph (158 km/h) fastball, a 91 mph (146 km/h) changeup, an 89 mph (143 km/h) slider, and an 80 mph (130 km/h) curveball.[108] He is one of the hardest-throwing active MLB starting pitchers: in 2018, the average velocity of his four-seam fastball, sinker, changeup, and slider were all the highest of any major league starter, and he has been known to reach fastball speeds up to 101 mph (163 km/h).[109] His average fastball velocity of 97.9 mph (157.6 km/h) was about 1.5 mph (2.4 km/h) faster than the next-best starting pitcher, and was the fastest average pitch velocity since 2007, the first year that the metric was reliably tracked.[110] Syndergaard's pitch velocity came under scrutiny in 2020, when he, like many other of the fastest pitchers in MLB, had to undergo Tommy John surgery for an elbow injury. Sportswriters like Tom Verducci of Sports Illustrated began to show concern that a focus on maximizing velocity was leading to injury for pitchers like Syndergaard.[111]

On the mound, Syndergaard has told reporters that he wants to be "as intimidating as possible", in sharp contrast with his reserved personality outside of game scenarios.[112] Syndergaard also has a notably subdued pitch delivery system, mostly foregoing a windup in favor of always pitching from the stretch, a decision that he believes improves his pitch control and helps him replicate his mechanics more reliably.[113][114]

Personal life

Syndergaard received the nickname "Thor" from Mets fans in 2013, when he posted a video on Twitter of himself weightlifting while wearing a Halloween costume of the Marvel Cinematic Universe character of the same name.[115] The nickname also alludes to Syndergaard's Scandinavian heritage, as the Marvel character is based on a Germanic deity.[116] Syndergaard's last name has been repeatedly misspelled by MLB: his poster at the 2016 All-Star Game read "Snydergaard", while a jersey advertisement featured on the Fanatics team store spelled his name "Synedrgaard".[117] All of Syndergaard's baseball gloves are named after fictional characters. In addition to his signature "Thor" glove, he has also used gloves named "Drago", "Heisenberg", "Rick Grimes", "Tyrion Lannister", "Jon Snow", and "Loki".[3][118] One glove not named after a fictional character is "Lion", named after an inside joke with Kevin Pillar: Syndergaard is the "lion on the mound", and Pillar the "lion in the outfield".[118] Syndergaard regularly auctions off his gloves to raise money for research into Sjögren syndrome, an autoimmune disease from which his mother suffers.[3][118]

Outside of baseball, Syndergaard had made a number of cameo appearances on television shows. In 2016, he made a guest appearance on the sitcom Kevin Can Wait, fronted by lifelong Mets fan Kevin James.[119] In the Halloween-themed episode, Syndergaard plays a man dressed as a Viking who confronts Chale, one of the main characters.[120] Later that year, he appeared as himself in a voice acting capacity for a World Series-themed episode of the Cartoon Network television show Uncle Grandpa. The episode also featured fellow MLB All-Stars David Price, Adam Jones, Chris Archer, and José Altuve.[121] In 2017, Syndergaard appeared in the Game of Thrones episode "The Spoils of War",[122] acting as a spearman for House Lannister who is eventually killed by one of Daenerys Targaryen's dragons.[123] That same year, Syndergaard appeared as himself on an episode of the reality television prank show Impractical Jokers. The prank involved Syndergaard attempting to throw autographed baseballs to young fans in the stands, only for cast member Joe Gatto to steal the balls from the children.[124]

Syndergaard maintains an active social media presence, particularly on Twitter.[125] While recovering from Tommy John surgery, Syndergaard used his social media presence to form a book club with fans, saying that reading was both a way to feel connected with fans and a way to further his education, as he did not attend college.[126] In 2021, he publicly feuded with Dodgers pitcher Trevor Bauer over Twitter regarding an incident in which Bauer's personal website advertised New York Mets merchandise, suggesting that Bauer had signed with the team, when he had actually signed with the Dodgers.[127][128] Later that year, Syndergaard also feuded with retired radio announcer Mike Francesa on Twitter after Francesa criticized Syndergaard's decision to leave the Mets for the Angels.[129]

References

  1. ^ a b "Noah Syndergaard Stats, Fantasy & News". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on November 23, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  2. ^ a b Reiter, Ben (February 8, 2017). "Synderella: How Noah Syndergaard went from awkward kid to Mets ace". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  3. ^ a b c Serby, Steve (May 30, 2015). "Noah Syndergaard on '6 aces,' onesies and 'Game of Thrones'". New York Post. Archived from the original on November 25, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  4. ^ a b Harper, John (January 21, 2014). "NY Mets' Noah Syndergaard could follow path of Matt Harvey to become next pitching phenom". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  5. ^ Boyle, Chris (July 28, 2020). "Ex-Tortugas Tyler Stephenson, Tejay Antone star in MLB debuts for Reds". The Daytona Beach News-Journal. Archived from the original on January 19, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  6. ^ Davison, Drew (June 17, 2010). "Pitcher's big season shows on draft day". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. p. 8D. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022 – via Newspapers.com. icon of an open green padlock
  7. ^ Elliott, Bob (May 19, 2015). "How former Blue Jays prospect Noah Syndergaard was discovered". Toronto Sun. Archived from the original on August 14, 2016. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  8. ^ Rohan, Tim (March 2, 2014). "The Mets' Future Strikes a Presence". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 5, 2019. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  9. ^ Guardado, Maria (June 15, 2015). "Mets' Noah Syndergaard: Facing Toronto Blue Jays, his former organization, will be 'just another game'". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  10. ^ Vorkunov, Mike (March 9, 2014). "Mets Noah Syndergaard under spotlight as he follows path blazed by Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  11. ^ Callis, Jim (May 8, 2015). "Syndergaard's upside high, hard to match". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  12. ^ a b c d e f "Noah Syndergaard Minor Leagues Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on January 8, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  13. ^ Ewen, Steve (August 15, 2011). "The fastest ball in the Northwest". The Province. p. A30. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022 – via Newspapers.com. icon of an open green padlock
  14. ^ Cunningham, Jordy (May 23, 2019). "The Top Nine Vancouver Canadians from the Last Nine Draft Classes". MiLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  15. ^ Pap, Elliott (August 25, 2011). "C's fade in the standings, but not in the stands". Vancouver Sun. p. C10. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022 – via Newspapers.com. icon of an open green padlock
  16. ^ Fidlin, Ken (April 13, 2012). "Jays well-armed and ready to fire". The Kingston Whig-Standard. p. 19. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022 – via Newspapers.com. icon of an open green padlock
  17. ^ Lott, John (May 25, 2012). "Piggyback ride". National Post. p. S4. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022 – via Newspapers.com. icon of an open green padlock
  18. ^ Makarweics, Daniel (June 21, 2012). "Midwest League's stars of Stars". The Dispatch / The Rock Island Argus. p. D3. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022 – via Newspapers.com. icon of an open green padlock
  19. ^ "Mets trade Cy Young winner Dickey to Blue Jays". Sports Illustrated. December 17, 2012. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  20. ^ Pfahler, Laurel (April 3, 2013). "Anniversary Party". St. Lucie News-Tribune. p. 3C. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022 – via Newspapers.com. icon of an open green padlock
  21. ^ "Three Mets Players Named to FSL All-Star Team". MiLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. June 5, 2013. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  22. ^ Worthy, Lynn (June 23, 2013). "Syndergaard to debut today". Press & Sun-Bulletin. p. E3. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022 – via Newspapers.com. icon of an open green padlock
  23. ^ DiComo, Anthony (July 14, 2013). "Syndergaard, Montero put up zeros as Futures starters". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  24. ^ Czerwinski, Kevin T. (September 8, 2013). "Mets have another pitching weapon in minors". USA Today. Archived from the original on April 11, 2019. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  25. ^ Rubin, Adam (April 4, 2014). "Minors 4.4.14: Noah wins Vegas debut". ESPN. Archived from the original on March 17, 2019. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  26. ^ Brewer, Ray (May 18, 2014). "Las Vegas 51s pitcher Noah Syndergaard taking his game to new heights". Las Vegas Sun. Archived from the original on May 25, 2014. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  27. ^ Lennon, David (July 13, 2014). "Noah Syndergaard has bigger plans than being in the Futures Game". Newsday. Archived from the original on July 19, 2014. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  28. ^ Vorkunov, Mike (September 7, 2014). "Mets won't call up Noah Syndergaard this year; pitcher tweets disappointment". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  29. ^ Rubin, Adam (May 8, 2015). "With RHP Dillon Gee DL-bound, Noah Syndergaard to make Mets debut". ESPN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  30. ^ Rohan, Tim (May 9, 2015). "Dillon Gee Is Out, Noah Syndergaard Is Up, and David Wright Has a Setback". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  31. ^ Strauss, Ben (May 12, 2015). "Noah Syndergaard's Mets Debut Has Smooth Start and Bumpy End". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  32. ^ Trezza, Joe (May 17, 2015). "Thor signals arrival with mighty home debut". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  33. ^ Rubin, Adam (May 22, 2015). "Mets to use six-man rotation with Noah Syndergaard, Dillon Gee". ESPN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  34. ^ Vorkunov, Mike (June 15, 2015). "Mets DFA Dillon Gee so when is Steven Matz finally getting here?". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  35. ^ "Noah Syndergaard Helps Mets Sweep Phillies With Bat and Arm". The New York Times. May 27, 2015. Archived from the original on October 1, 2015. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  36. ^ "Syndergaard strikes out 13, Mets power past D-backs 4–2". ESPN. Associated Press. July 10, 2015. Archived from the original on February 22, 2020. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  37. ^ "Lucas Duda and Noah Syndergaard named National League Co-Players of the Week". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. August 3, 2015. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  38. ^ a b c d e "Noah Syndergaard Stats". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on January 4, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  39. ^ Berry, Adam (November 16, 2015). "Kang finishes 3rd on NL Rookie of Year ballot". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  40. ^ Rohan, Tim (September 26, 2015). "After Nine-Year Wait, the Mets Are Returning to the Postseason". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  41. ^ Vorkunov, Mike (October 11, 2015). "Mets lose Game 2 to Los Angeles Dodgers, 5–2, as series gets nasty". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  42. ^ Botte, Peter (October 16, 2015). "Noah Syndergaard, Jeurys Familia provide relief for Mets, close out L.A." New York Daily News. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  43. ^ Rohan, Tim (October 19, 2015). "Daniel Murphy (Who Else?) Powers Mets to a 2–0 Series Lead". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 5, 2019. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  44. ^ Ortiz, Jorge L. (October 21, 2015). "Mets sweep Cubs, advance to World Series". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  45. ^ Feinsand, Mark (October 31, 2015). "Royals fired up over Mets starter Noah Syndergaard's 'plan' to throw at Alcides Escobar". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  46. ^ Vorkunov, Mike (October 31, 2015). "Gritty Noah Syndergaard saves Mets in World Series Game 3 win over Kansas City Royals". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  47. ^ "Relive the crowning of the 2015 Royals: Here's how they won it in World Series Game 5". The Kansas City Star. May 21, 2020. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  48. ^ Carig, Matt (March 29, 2016). "Sources: Royals seek payback for Noah Syndergaard pitch in World Series". Newsday. Archived from the original on May 10, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  49. ^ Rohan, Tim (April 5, 2016). "Noah Syndergaard Steadies Mets as Royals Temper Emotions". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  50. ^ Zaleon, Avi (April 19, 2016). "Mansfield Legacy grad, Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard leaves his mark...on his catcher's chest". The Dallas Morning News. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  51. ^ DiComo, Anthony (May 11, 2016). "2 by who? Pair of HRs makes LA Noah's Park". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  52. ^ "Mets' Noah Syndergaard named National League Player of the Week". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. May 23, 2016. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  53. ^ Rubin, Adam (May 28, 2016). "Chase Utley homers twice after Noah Syndergaard ejected for pitch". ESPN. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  54. ^ Guardado, Maria (June 28, 2016). "Mets' Noah Syndergaard done after 3 innings in worst start of season". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  55. ^ "Mets' Syndergaard confirms bone spur, says it's 'pretty insignificant'". ESPN. Associated Press. June 29, 2016. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  56. ^ Ackert, Kristie (July 6, 2016). "Yoenis Cespedes, Noah Syndergaard, Jeurys Familia make NL All-Star team for Mets". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  57. ^ Rubin, Adam (July 9, 2016). "Mets' Syndergaard, Cespedes out of All-Star Game; Cubs' Fowler, too". ESPN. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  58. ^ "Syndergaard homers, gets win as Mets beat Arizona 7–5". ESPN. Associated Press. August 17, 2016. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  59. ^ Rubin, Adam (August 17, 2016). "Noah Syndergaard swings his way into Mets record book". ESPN. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  60. ^ Guardado, Maria (September 14, 2016). "Mets ace Noah Syndergaard's dominant 2016 campaign by the numbers". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  61. ^ DiComo, Anthony (October 2, 2016). "Thor prepared, eager to start Wild Card Game". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  62. ^ Schulman, Henry (October 5, 2016). "Giants win wild-card game on Gillaspie's home run". San Francisco Chronicle. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  63. ^ Lyons, Dan (November 16, 2021). "Report: Noah Syndergaard, Angels Agree to One-Year Deal". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on November 17, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  64. ^ Carig, Marc (April 2, 2017). "Mets ace Noah Syndergaard ready for Opening Day start". Newsday. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  65. ^ Berg, Ted (April 3, 2017). "Noah Syndergaard dominates Braves before leaving game over blister issue". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  66. ^ Kepner, Tyler (April 3, 2017). "For Mets' Noah Syndergaard, Goose Bumps Tower Over a Blister on Opening Day". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  67. ^ Wagner, James (May 1, 2017). "Mets' Noah Syndergaard Out Indefinitely With Torn Muscle in Torso". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  68. ^ DiComo, Anthony (September 26, 2017). "Injuries define difficult season for Mets". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  69. ^ Crasnick, Jerry (May 18, 2017). "Mets' injury issues go far beyond disabled list". ESPN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  70. ^ Nightengale, Bob (May 1, 2017). "Mets' Noah Syndergaard the latest pitcher injured in a 'system that's flawed'". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  71. ^ Baker, Katie (August 24, 2017). "'A Freak Accident:' Michael Conforto's Injury Sums Up the Mets' Lost Season". The Ringer. Archived from the original on January 8, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  72. ^ "Mets' Noah Syndergaard to return and pitch 1 inning Saturday". USA Today. September 22, 2017. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  73. ^ DiComo, Anthony (September 23, 2017). "Syndergaard makes brief but encouraging return". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  74. ^ Mastracco, Abbey (October 1, 2017). "Noah Syndergaard only highlight for Mets in 11–0 route by Phillies". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  75. ^ Ehalt, Matt (March 28, 2018). "Noah Syndergaard to start opening day against Cardinals while aiming for 200 innings". NorthJersey. Archived from the original on April 19, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  76. ^ DiComo, Anthony (March 29, 2018). "Thor is 2nd Met to fan 10 on Opening Day". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  77. ^ McElhaney, Tori (May 29, 2018). "Syndergaard goes on DL with finger injury". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  78. ^ Wagner, James (July 13, 2018). "Syndergaard Returns for Five Innings in Mets' Win Over Nationals". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  79. ^ Axson, Scooby (July 22, 2018). "Mets Place Noah Syndergaard On DL With Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  80. ^ Boren, Cindy (August 1, 2018). "Hand, foot and mouth disease strikes again. This time, the Yankees' J. A. Happ is ailing". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on September 17, 2018. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  81. ^ Wagaman, Michael (September 2, 2018). "Noah Syndergaard throws 2-hitter in his first complete game as NY Mets top Giants, 4–1". NorthJersey. Archived from the original on July 23, 2019. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  82. ^ Healey, Tim (October 1, 2018). "Noah Syndergaard's first shutout ends season for Mets". Newsday. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  83. ^ Healey, Tim (March 31, 2019). "Noah Syndergaard's slider the culprit of 'mediocre' start". Newsday. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  84. ^ Heyman, Brian (April 27, 2019). "Numbers don't lie – Mets starters close to worst in MLB". Newsday. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  85. ^ DiComo, Anthony (May 2, 2019). "Thor's rare feat hasn't been done since 1983". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  86. ^ "Mets' Noah Syndergaard named NL Player of the Week". SportsNet New York. May 6, 2019. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  87. ^ Kelly, Matt (August 5, 2019). "Vlad Jr., Thor named Players of the Week". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  88. ^ Passan, Jeff (February 7, 2019). "Major League Baseball to rename disabled list as 'injured list'". ESPN. Archived from the original on October 5, 2021. Retrieved October 5, 2021.
  89. ^ Albanese, Laura (June 30, 2019). "Encouraging return for Mets' Noah Syndergaard". Newsday. Archived from the original on July 2, 2019. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  90. ^ DiComo, Anthony (September 9, 2019). "Thor raises concerns about Ramos pairing". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on November 12, 2020. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  91. ^ Healey, Tim (September 10, 2019). "Noah Syndergaard regrets his concerns about his catcher were leaked". Newsday. Archived from the original on September 21, 2019. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  92. ^ DiComo, Anthony (March 27, 2020). "Syndergaard undergoes Tommy John surgery". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on January 5, 2022. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  93. ^ Armstrong, Kevin (March 24, 2020). "Mets' Noah Syndergaard Will Have Tommy John Surgery". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2022. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  94. ^ Baccellieri, Emma (March 30, 2020). "Is It Wrong for Baseball Players to Get Tommy John Surgery?". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  95. ^ Kepner, Tyler (April 2, 2020). "There's a Pandemic. Is This a Time for Tommy John Surgery?". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  96. ^ Rieber, Anthony (December 22, 2020). "Mets, Noah Syndergaard reach one-year, $9.7M deal to avoid arbitration". Newsday. Archived from the original on March 3, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  97. ^ Healey, Tim (February 17, 2021). "Mets' Noah Syndergaard throws bullpen session, continues to progress as expected in Tommy John rehab". Newsday. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  98. ^ Thosar, Deesha (May 17, 2021). "Noah Syndergaard, Seth Lugo to pitch minor league games this week". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  99. ^ DiComo, Anthony (May 27, 2021). "Syndergaard (elbow) shut down for 6 weeks". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on November 17, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  100. ^ Heyman, Brian (August 27, 2021). "Noah Syndergaard pitches an inning for Brooklyn in rehab start". Newsday. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  101. ^ DiComo, Anthony (September 29, 2021). "He's back! Thor K's 2, hits 96 mph in return". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on December 10, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  102. ^ "Braves end regular season by blanking Mets". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Associated Press. October 3, 2021. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  103. ^ Ragazzo, Pat (November 15, 2021). "Why Noah Syndergaard Accepting Mets' Qualifying Offer Is No Guarantee". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 6, 2022. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  104. ^ Harrigan, Thomas; Bollinger, Rhett (November 17, 2021). "Angels reel in Thor: 'We're betting on him'". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on December 9, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2022.
  105. ^ Snyder, Matt (December 17, 2021). "Noah Syndergaard will be first Angels player to wear No. 34 since Nick Adenhart". CBSSports.com. Paramount Global. Retrieved April 10, 2022.
  106. ^ Bollinger, Rhett (April 9, 2022). "Syndergaard a ground-ball machine in Angels debut". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved April 10, 2022.
  107. ^ "Phillies trade for Thor, send Moniak to Angels". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. August 2, 2022. Retrieved August 2, 2022.
  108. ^ "Noah Syndergaard". Baseball Savant. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on November 24, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  109. ^ Adler, David (March 25, 2018). "Thor throws the fastest everything". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  110. ^ Wagner, James (April 2, 2017). "How Much Harder can a Starter Throw? Noah Syndergaard Could Find Out". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 12, 2020. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  111. ^ Verducci, Tom (April 10, 2020). "Need for Speed: MLB's Hardest Throwers Are Paying a High Price". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on May 9, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  112. ^ Rubin, Adam (February 18, 2016). "Noah Syndergaard: 'I try to be as intimidating as possible'". ESPN. Archived from the original on March 9, 2020. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  113. ^ Diamond, Jared (April 12, 2017). "Why Baseball's Biggest Arms Are Ditching the Windup". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on June 2, 2019. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  114. ^ Sielski, Mike (March 4, 2017). "A quieter windup may be key for one of Phillies' top young pitchers". The Press of Atlantic City. Archived from the original on April 22, 2019. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  115. ^ Guardado, Maria (May 15, 2016). "'He is Thor': How Mets' Noah Syndergaard forged his superhero persona". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 8, 2022. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  116. ^ Borden, Sam; Rohan, Tim (September 18, 2015). "The Met, the Myth: Searching for Noah Syndergaard's Viking Roots in Denmark". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  117. ^ Payne, Marissa (August 23, 2016). "Noah Synedrgaard, er, Syndergaard is tired of his name being misspelled". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 15, 2019. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  118. ^ a b c Kernan, Kevin (August 13, 2015). "How Noah Syndergaard is helping as his brave mom battles disease". New York Post. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  119. ^ "Noah Syndergaard dons Thor costume while filming 'Kevin Can Wait'". ESPN. October 24, 2016. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  120. ^ Guardado, Maria (October 31, 2016). "Check out photos from Mets ace Noah Syndergaard's cameo on 'Kevin Can Wait'". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  121. ^ Robinson, Will (October 14, 2016). "MLB All-Stars join Uncle Grandpa for World Series episode". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  122. ^ Medeiros, Madison (August 7, 2017). "There Was Another Celebrity Cameo On Game Of Thrones & You Probably Missed It". Refinery29. Archived from the original on January 8, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  123. ^ Hoffman, Benjamin (August 7, 2017). "Noah Syndergaard's 'Game of Thrones' Cameo Ends in Fiery Death". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  124. ^ "Mets' Syndergaard assists with prank in comedy show 'Impractical Jokers'". NorthJersey. September 28, 2017. Archived from the original on February 28, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  125. ^ Mastracco, Abbey (February 3, 2017). "Mets' Noah Syndergaard's top 10 social media offseason moments". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  126. ^ Krueger, Alyson (September 17, 2021). "Why This Superstar Pitcher for the Mets Started a Book Club". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  127. ^ "Mets' Noah Syndergaard, Dodgers' Trevor Bauer get into Twitter spat". Newsday. February 19, 2021. Archived from the original on April 21, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  128. ^ Coleman, Madeline (February 19, 2021). "Noah Syndergaard Trolls Trevor Bauer on Twitter; Bauer Fires Back". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on June 15, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  129. ^ Traina, Jimmy (November 22, 2021). "Thor vs. The Pope: Noah Syndergaard and Mike Francesa Get Snippy on Twitter". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on November 23, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2022.