The Nevada Portal

Panorama of the Ruby Mountains from Lamoille Summit along Nevada State Route 227 (2013)
Panorama of the Ruby Mountains from Lamoille Summit along Nevada State Route 227 (2013)

Nevada (/nɪˈvædə/ niv-AD; Spanish: [neˈβaða]) is a state in the Western region of the United States. It is bordered by Oregon to the northwest, Idaho to the northeast, California to the west, Arizona to the southeast, and Utah to the east. Nevada is the 7th-most extensive, the 32nd-most populous, and the 9th-least densely populated of the U.S. states. Nearly three-quarters of Nevada's people live in Clark County, which contains the Las Vegas–Paradise metropolitan area, including three of the state's four largest incorporated cities. Nevada's capital is Carson City while the largest city is Las Vegas.

Nevada is officially known as the "Silver State" because of the importance of silver to its history and economy. It is also known as the "Battle Born State" because it achieved statehood during the Civil War (the words "Battle Born" also appear on its state flag); as the "Sagebrush State", for the native plant of the same name; and as the "Sage-hen State". The name means "snowy" in Spanish, referring to Nevada's small overlap with the Sierra Nevada mountain range; however, the rest of Nevada is largely desert and semi-arid, much of it within the Great Basin. Areas south of the Great Basin are within the Mojave Desert, while Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Nevada lie on the western edge. About 86% of the state's land is managed by various jurisdictions of the U.S. federal government, both civilian and military.

American Indians of the Paiute, Shoshone, and Washoe tribes inhabit what is now Nevada. The first Europeans to explore the region were Spanish. They called the region Nevada (snowy) because of the snow which covered the mountains in winter similar to the Sierra Nevada in Spain. The area formed part of Alta California's territory within the Viceroyalty of New Spain, which gained independence as Mexico in 1821. The United States annexed the area in 1848 after its victory in the Mexican–American War, and it was incorporated as part of Utah Territory in 1850. The discovery of silver at the Comstock Lode in 1859 led to a population boom that became an impetus to the creation of Nevada Territory out of western Utah Territory in 1861. Nevada became the 36th state on October 31, 1864, as the second of two states added to the Union during the Civil War (the first being West Virginia). (Full article...)

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The Trout Creek Mountains are a remote, semi-arid Great Basin mountain range mostly in southeastern Oregon and partially in northern Nevada in the United States. The range's highest point is Orevada View Benchmark, 8,506 feet (2,593 m) above sea level, in Nevada. Disaster Peak, elevation 7,781 feet (2,372 m), is another prominent summit in the Nevada portion of the mountains.

The mountains are characteristic of the Great Basin's topography of mostly parallel mountain ranges alternating with flat valleys. Oriented generally north to south, the Trout Creek Mountains consist primarily of fault blocks of basalt, which came from an ancient volcano and other vents, on top of older metamorphic rocks. The southern end of the range, however, features many granitic outcrops. As a whole, the faulted terrain is dominated by rolling hills and ridges cut by escarpments and canyons. (Full article...)
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Anaconda Copper Mine. Inactive since 1978, the pit has flooded.
Anaconda Copper Mine. Inactive since 1978, the pit has flooded.
The Anaconda Copper Mine is an open pit copper mine in Lyon County, Nevada that was owned and operated by the Anaconda Mining Company. It is located adjacent to the town of Yerington. A company town, Weed Heights, was built to support the mining operation, which ran from 1952 until 1978. The Anaconda Copper Mine is one of three EPA Superfund sites in the state of Nevada. (Full article...)
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Largest cities

Name Type County Population
(2020)
Population
(2010)
Change Land area
(2020)
Population density Incorporation date
sq mi km2
Boulder City City Clark 14,885 15,023 −0.9% 208.52 540.1 71.4/sq mi (27.6/km2) October 1, 1959
Caliente City Lincoln 990 1,130 −12.4% 1.87 4.8 529.4/sq mi (204.4/km2) October 1, 1959
Carlin City Elko 2,050 2,368 −13.4% 10.44 27.0 196.4/sq mi (75.8/km2) October 22, 1925
Carson CityIndependent City None 58,639 55,274 +6.1% 144.66 374.7 405.4/sq mi (156.5/km2) March 1, 1875
ElkoCounty seat City Elko 20,564 18,297 +12.4% 17.64 45.7 1,165.8/sq mi (450.1/km2) March 14, 1917
ElyCounty seat City White Pine 3,924 4,255 −7.8% 7.64 19.8 513.6/sq mi (198.3/km2) July 20, 1907
FallonCounty seat City Churchill 9,327 8,606 +8.4% 3.63 9.4 2,569.4/sq mi (992.1/km2) December 18, 1908
Fernley City Lyon 22,895 19,368 +18.2% 122.12 316.3 187.5/sq mi (72.4/km2) July 1, 2001
Henderson City Clark 317,610 257,729 +23.2% 107.73 279.0 2,948.2/sq mi (1,138.3/km2) June 8, 1953
Las VegasCounty seat City Clark 641,903 583,756 +10.0% 135.81 351.7 4,726.5/sq mi (1,824.9/km2) March 16, 1905

State capital  State capital and independent city

County seat  County seat

See List of cities in Nevada for a full list.

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