Strathclyde
Srath Chluaidh
Former Region
Strathclyde Regional Council Logo.png
Strathclyde within Scotland

Area
1,350,283 hectares (3,336,620 acres)
Population
c. 2,286,800
History
 • OriginLocal Government (Scotland) Act 1973
 • Created16 May 1975
 • Abolished31 March 1996
 • Succeeded byArgyll and Bute
East Ayrshire
East Dunbartonshire
East Renfrewshire
Glasgow City Council
Inverclyde
North Ayrshire
North Lanarkshire
Renfrewshire
South Ayrshire
South Lanarkshire
West Dunbartonshire
GovernmentStrathclyde Regional Council
 • TypeRegional Council
 • HQStrathclyde House, India Street, Glasgow

Strathclyde (Srath Chluaidh [s̪t̪ɾa ˈxl̪ˠɯi] in Gaelic, meaning "strath (valley) of the River Clyde") was one of nine former local government regions of Scotland created in 1975 by the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 and abolished in 1996 by the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994. The Strathclyde region had 19 districts. The region was named after the medieval Kingdom of Strathclyde but covered a broader geographic area than its namesake.

History

The Strathclyde region was created in 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, which established a two-tier structure of local government across Scotland comprising upper-tier regions and lower-tier districts. Strathclyde covered the whole area of six counties and parts of another two, which were all abolished for local government purposes at the same time:[1][2][3][4]

The region was named after the ancient British or Brythonic Damnonii Kingdom of Strathclyde. The kingdom had broadly covered the southern part of the region created in 1975, with the Argyll and Buteshire parts of the region not having been within the ancient kingdom. Conversely, the kingdom had at times included areas further to the south which were not included in the region created in 1975, including Dumfries and Galloway and Cumbria.

Strathclyde Regional Council's Education Department on the corner of St Vincent Street and North Street
Strathclyde Regional Council's Education Department on the corner of St Vincent Street and North Street

Strathclyde Regional Council was responsible for education, social work, police, fire, sewage, strategic planning, roads, and transport. It employed almost 100,000 public servants, almost half of whom were teachers, lecturers and others in the education service.[5][6]

Strathclyde region was abolished in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 which replaced regions and districts with unitary council areas. The region was divided into twelve council areas: Argyll and Bute, East Ayrshire, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Glasgow City (created as City of Glasgow), Inverclyde, North Ayrshire, North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Ayrshire, South Lanarkshire, and West Dunbartonshire (created as Dumbarton and Clydebank)[7]

Geography

The Strathclyde region was on the west coast of Scotland and stretched from the Highlands in the north to the Southern Uplands in the south. It included some of the Inner Hebrides in the north-west but also contained Scotland's largest urban area of Glasgow. As a local government region, its population, in excess of 2.5 million, was by far the largest of the regions and contained half of the population of Scotland.[8]

Political control

Politics in the region were dominated by the Labour Party. The first regional council convener was the Reverend Geoff Shaw, who died in 1978. It was largely due to his leadership that the regional council forged its innovative strategy on multiple deprivation, which remained its central commitment to the end of the region's life through "Social Strategy for the Eighties" (1982) and "SS for the 90s".[9]

The first election to Strathclyde Regional Council was held in 1974, initially operating as a shadow authority alongside the outgoing authorities until the new system came into force on 16 May 1975. Throughout the council's existence Labour held a majority of the seats:[10]

Party in control Years
Labour 1975–1996

Leadership

The council had two main leadership roles: a convener who acted as ceremonial head and presided at council meetings, and a leader of the council to provide political leadership.

Conveners

Councillor Party From To
Geoff Shaw Labour 1975 1978
Charles O'Halloran Labour 1978 1982
James Burns Labour 1982 1986
James Jennings Labour 1986 1990
David Sanderson Labour 1990 1994
William Perry Labour 1994 1996

Leaders

Councillor Party From To
Dick Stewart Labour 1975 1986
Charles Gray Labour 1986 1992
Robert Gould Labour 1992 1996

Elections

Elections were held every four years.[10]

Year Seats Labour SNP Liberal Democrats[a] Conservative Independent / Other Notes
1974 103 71 5 2 20 5
1978 103 73 2 2 25 1
1982 103 79 3 4 15 2
1986 103 87 2 5 6 3
1990 103 90 1 4 5 3
1994 104 86 7 4 3 2 New ward boundaries.[11]
  1. ^ Liberals prior to 1988.

District result maps

Premises

Main building of old High School (built 1846), became part of Strathclyde House, the council's headquarters.
Main building of old High School (built 1846), became part of Strathclyde House, the council's headquarters.
Another block of Strathclyde House on the corner of Elmbank Crescent and India Street, later called Nye Bevan House
Another block of Strathclyde House on the corner of Elmbank Crescent and India Street, later called Nye Bevan House

The council initially rented offices called Melrose House at 19 Cadogan Street in Glasgow to act as an interim headquarters pending a decision being taken on a permanent headquarters. Various other offices around the centre of Glasgow were also used for additional office space, notably on India Street. In 1976, the nearby former Glasgow High School buildings at 94 Elmbank Street were vacated. The council converted the former school buildings to become its headquarters, using the school's dining room block of 1897 to become a council chamber, whilst using the India Street offices as additional accommodation.[12] The remodelled school and neighbouring offices were formally opened by Elizabeth II on 2 November 1979, when the whole complex of eleven buildings was collectively renamed "Strathclyde House".[13][14]

After the council's abolition several of the modern office buildings which made up Strathclyde House were gradually sold off for redevelopment.[15][16][17] The old High School buildings, which are category A listed buildings, were used by Glasgow City Council as additional office space.[18][19] The council chamber there was briefly used in 2000 by the Scottish Parliament, whilst its new permanent home at Holyrood was under construction and the temporary buildings in Edinburgh were booked out.[20] Glasgow City Council sold the old High School buildings in 2010 but a new use has yet to be found for them.[21]

Emergency services

Until April 2013, the area was also used as a police force area, covered by Strathclyde Police, and a fire service area, covered by Strathclyde Fire and Rescue Service. Both have now been replaced by single services (Police Scotland and Scottish Fire and Rescue Service).

Transport

The name is still in use as a transport area, covered by Strathclyde Partnership for Transport. The area covered by SPT however is smaller than the region, as most of Argyll and Bute lies outside its remit.

Sub-regions and districts

Except for Argyll and Bute and the City of Glasgow, the 19 districts were grouped to form 'sub-regions' or 'divisions', each named after a historic county. The Argyll and Bute district and the City of Glasgow district were sub-regions in their own right, and Argyll and Bute was named after two counties.[22]

Sub-region District or districts[23] Composition
in terms of counties, burghs, and other areas specified by the 1973 Act
Argyll and Bute Argyll and Bute In county of Argyll: burghs of Campbeltown, Dunoon, Inveraray, Lochgilphead, Oban, and Tobermory; and districts of Cowal, Islay, Jura and Colonsay, Kintyre, Mid Argyll, Mull, North Lorn except the electoral divisions of Ballachulish and Kinlochleven, South Lorn, and Tiree and Coll

In county of Bute: burgh of Rothesay; and district of Bute

Ayr Cumnock and Doon Valley In county of Ayr: burgh of Cumnock and Holmhead; and districts of Cumnock and Dalmellington except that part of parish of Ayr within this district and polling district of Coylton
Cunninghame In county of Ayr: burghs of Ardrossan, Irvine, Kilwinning, Largs, Saltcoats, and Stevenston; districts of Irvine, Kilbirnie, and West Kilbride, and those parts of Irvine New Town within districts of Ayr and Kilmarnock

In county of Bute: burgh of Millport; and districts of Arran, and Cumbrae

Kilmarnock and Loudoun In county of Ayr: burghs of Darvel, Galston, Kilmarnock, Newmilns and Greenholm, and Stewarton; and district of Kilmarnock except that part of Irvine New Town within this district
Kyle and Carrick In county of Ayr: burghs of Ayr, Girvan, Maybole, Prestwick, and Troon; districts of Ayr except that part of Irvine New Town within this district, Girvan, and Maybole, that part of parish of Ayr within the district of Dalmellington; and polling district of Coylton
Dunbarton Bearsden and Milngavie In county of Dunbarton: burghs of Bearsden and Milngavie; and that part of electoral division of Hardgate within parish of New Kilpatrick
Clydebank In county of Dunbarton: burgh of Clydebank; and district of Old Kilpatrick except electoral divisions of Bowling and Dunbarton and that part of electoral division of Hardgate within parish of New Kilpatrick
Cumbernauld and Kilsyth In county of Dunbarton: burgh of Cumbernauld; electoral division of Croy and Dullatur and those parts of electoral divisions of Twechar and Waterside within Cumbernauld New Town

In county of Stirling: burgh of Kilsyth; electoral division of Kilsyth West; and polling district of Kilsyth East (Banton)

Dumbarton In county of Dunbarton: burghs of Dumbarton, Cove and Kilcreggan, and Helensburgh; districts of Helensburgh, and Vale of Leven; and electoral divisions of Bowling and Dunbarton
Strathkelvin In county of Dunbarton: burgh of Kirkintilloch; and those parts of the electoral divisions of Twechar and Waterside outwith Cumbernauld New Town

In county of Lanark: burgh of Bishopbriggs; and electoral divisions of Chryston and Stepps
In county of Stirling: Western No 3 district

Glasgow City of Glasgow County of City of Glasgow

In county of Lanark: burgh of Rutherglen; and parts of the Eighth district (electoral divisions of Bankhead, Cambuslang Central, Cambuslang North, Hallside, and Rutherglen, and those parts of Cambuslang South and Carmunnock electoral divisions outwith East Kilbride New Town) and the Ninth district (electoral divisions of Baillieston, Garrowhill, Mount Vernon and Carmyle, and Springboig)

Lanark Clydesdale In county of Lanark: burghs of Biggar, and Lanark; and First, Second, and Third districts
East Kilbride In county of Lanark: burgh of East Kilbride; in Fourth district, electoral division of Avondale and, in Eighth district, those parts of High Blantyre, Cambuslang South, and Carmunnock electoral divisions within East Kilbride New Town
Hamilton In county of Lanark: burgh of Hamilton; Fourth district except electoral division of Avondale, in the Sixth district, electoral divisions of Bothwell and Uddingston South, and Uddingston North and, in Eighth district, electoral divisions of Blantyre, and Stonefield, and that part of High Blantyre electoral division outwith East Kilbride New Town.
Monklands In county of Lanark: burghs of Airdrie, and Coatbridge; Ninth district except electoral divisions of Baillieston, Chryston, Garrowhill, Mount Vernon and Carmyle, Springboig, and Stepps and, in Seventh district, electoral division of Shottskirk
Motherwell In county of Lanark: burgh of Motherwell and Wishaw; Sixth district except electoral divisions of Bothwell and Uddingston South, and Uddingston North and Seventh district except electoral division of Shottskirk
Renfrew Eastwood In county of Renfrew: First district
Renfrew In county of Renfrew: burghs of Barrhead, Johnstone, Paisley, and Renfrew; and Second, Third, and Fourth districts
Inverclyde In county of Renfrew: burghs of Gourock, Greenock, Port Glasgow; and Fifth district

Successor Council Areas

Council area Composition
in terms of districts and other areas specified by the 1994 Act
Argyll and Bute Argyll and Bute district and part of Dumbarton district (Helensburgh (7) regional electoral division and part of Vale of Leven (8) regional electoral division)
East Ayrshire Kilmarnock and Loudoun and Cumnock and Doon Valley districts
East Dunbartonshire Bearsden and Milngavie district and part of Strathkelvin district (Kirkintilloch (43), Strathkelvin North (44) and Bishopbriggs (45) regional electoral divisions and South Lenzie/Waterside district ward)
East Renfrewshire Eastwood district and part of Renfrew district (Barrhead (79) regional electoral division)
Glasgow City (created as City of Glasgow) City of Glasgow district except Rutherglen/Fernhill (37) and Cambuslang/Halfway (38) regional electoral divisions and part of King's Park/Toryglen (35) regional electoral division
Inverclyde Inverclyde district
North Ayrshire Cunninghame district
North Lanarkshire Cumbernauld and Kilsyth, Monklands, Motherwell districts and part of Strathkelvin district (Chryston (46) regional electoral division except South Lenzie/Waterside district ward)
Renfrewshire Renfrew district except Barrhead (79) regional electoral division
South Ayrshire Kyle and Carrick district
South Lanarkshire Clydesdale, East Kilbride, and Hamilton districts and part of City of Glasgow district (Rutherglen/Fernhill (37) and Cambuslang/Halfway (38) regional electoral divisions and part of King's Park/Toryglen (35) regional electoral division)
West Dunbartonshire (created as Dumbarton and Clydebank) Clydebank and part of Dumbarton (Dumbarton (6) regional electoral division and part of Vale of Leven (8) regional electoral division)

See also

References

  1. ^ "Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973", legislation.gov.uk, The National Archives, 1973 c. 65, retrieved 3 January 2023
  2. ^ "New Local Government areas". Hansard. 22 October 1973. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  3. ^ Irene Maver. "Modern Times: 1950s to The Present Day > Neighbourhoods". The Glasgow Story. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  4. ^ "Scotland's Landscape: City of Glasgow". BBC. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  5. ^ A cry of 'Gerrymander' as Strathclyde is axed, The Independent, 18 July 1993
  6. ^ Region hands over reins after 21 years, The Herald, 18 March 1996
  7. ^ "Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994", legislation.gov.uk, The National Archives, 1994 c. 39, retrieved 3 January 2023
  8. ^ Strathclyde, Undiscovered Scotland
  9. ^ "key papers". publicadminreform.
  10. ^ a b "Compositions calculator". The Elections Centre. Retrieved 5 January 2023.
  11. ^ "The Strathclyde Region (Electoral Arrangements) Order 1993", legislation.gov.uk, The National Archives, SI 1993/2439, retrieved 5 January 2023
  12. ^ "No. 22413". The Edinburgh Gazette. 2 September 1988. p. 1325.
  13. ^ "They'll meet the Queen". Wishaw Press. 2 November 1979. p. 1. Retrieved 5 January 2023.
  14. ^ "Regional Convenor sends his message". Wishaw Press. 28 December 1979. p. 1. Retrieved 5 January 2023.
  15. ^ "Property Services Committee minutes, 6 May 1998". Glasgow City Council. Retrieved 5 January 2023.
  16. ^ Final stage of demolition of Strathclyde Regional Council HQ begins, Evening Times, 10 March 2015
  17. ^ "Site of former Nye Bevan House in Glasgow up for sale". Insider.co.uk. 21 September 2022. Retrieved 27 December 2022.
  18. ^ Historic Environment Scotland. "120, Elmbank Street with 71-83 (odds) Holland Street and Lodges, 59, 61 Holland Street, gates and retaining walls (Category A Listed Building) (LB33022)". Retrieved 5 January 2023.
  19. ^ "High School building". The Glasgow Story. Retrieved 5 January 2023.
  20. ^ "Glasgow's miles better for parliament". BBC News. 13 January 2000. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  21. ^ Burns, Hamish (11 November 2019). "Grade A-listed former school is on the market with hotel and offices potential". insider.co.uk. Retrieved 5 January 2023.
  22. ^ "No. 20746". The Edinburgh Gazette. 8 August 1980. p. 980.
  23. ^ Various district names are not those given in the 1973 Act, but were chosen, under the same act, by the district councils themselves soon after their creation

Coordinates: 55°44′N 5°02′W / 55.733°N 5.033°W / 55.733; -5.033