Susquehanna University
Susquehanna University Original Seal.png
MottoAchievement, Leadership, Service
TypePrivate
Established1858; 164 years ago (1858)
AccreditationMSCHE
Religious affiliation
ELCA
Academic affiliations
Annapolis Group AAC&U ACE CIC CUR NAICU
Endowment$206 million (2021)[1]
PresidentJonathan D. Green
Academic staff
226[2]
Undergraduates2,239[3]
Location, ,
United States
CampusSmall college town
325 acres (132 ha)
ColorsOrange and Maroon
   
NicknameRiver Hawks
Sporting affiliations
NCAA Division III - Landmark Conference
Centennial Conference - football
MascotBenny the Hawk
Websitewww.susqu.edu
Susquehanna University logo.png

Susquehanna University is a private, non-profit liberal arts college in Selinsgrove, Snyder County, Pennsylvania.[4][5]

The university name is derived from the original Susquehannock settlers of the region. Founded in 1858 as a missionary institute, it became a four-year liberal arts university in 1895. It is affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.[6] Susquehanna is classified among "Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus", though it also has a business school, master's degrees in education and joint-degree programs in engineering and for a Master of Business Administration. It also offers the only bachelor's degree in luxury brand marketing and management in the U.S.[7]

The academic programs are within the four schools of the Arts, Humanities, Natural and Social Sciences, and the AACSB International-accredited Sigmund Weis School of Business. Susquehanna University enrolls more than 2,200 undergraduate students from 33 states and 23 countries,[8] and maintains a student-to-faculty ratio of 13 to 1.[9] Most students are required to live on campus all four years[10] and as of 2012, all students participate in a cross-cultural study away or service-learning experience known as the GO Program.

History

Founding and early years

The Missionary Institute’s first building, known as Selinsgrove Hall.
The Missionary Institute’s first building, known as Selinsgrove Hall.

The university was founded by Benjamin Kurtz, its first president. Having already assisted in the founding of Gettysburg Seminary, Kurtz wanted to create another institution to expand the form of American Lutheranism that he advocated.

Kurtz's mission was to “educate men for the gospel ministry … who cannot take a full course of training adapted to their age and circumstances; a course so thorough in theology as will qualify them to be able and faithful ministers of Christ.” The American Lutherans of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, provided 50 students, pledged $22,000, and offered the provisional use of its church facilities.[11] However, they stipulated that the institute be expanded to a junior college and that a sister college for women also be formed.[12]

Drawing of the Susquehanna Female College.
Drawing of the Susquehanna Female College.

On September 1, 1858, the Missionary Institute of the Evangelical Lutheran Church and Susquehanna Female College were established and legally recognized 23 days later. It had two departments: the theology department and the classical department. In 1873, the sister college disbanded and the institute became co-educational.

The institute officially became known as Susquehanna University in 1895.[13]

20th century

The 20th century brought many changes. The school had recently transitioned into a four-year university, offering bachelor degrees and changed its name to reflect that.[14] In 1903, the board approved Susquehanna’s colors, orange and maroon.[15]

By the 1920s, student enrollment skyrocketed, accommodations were refurbished and the campus expanded, and academic departments and offerings were enhanced.[16]

Academics

Susquehanna University is a private, non-profit liberal arts university in central Pennsylvania devoted primarily to undergraduate education. The university is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.[17] Susquehanna has a student-to-faculty ratio of 13:1 with 90% of full-time faculty holding a doctorate or highest equivalent degree.[18]

The university offers more than 100 majors, minors and programs[19] and allows students to design their own major, complete a double degree, or start undeclared.[20] Susquehanna offers pre-professional programs in pre-law, pre-veterinary medicine and teaching, and coordinates with Thomas Jefferson University for allied health, Temple University for dentistry and Case Western Reserve University, Columbia University, and Washington University in St. Louis for 3+2 dual-degree engineering programs.[21][22] It has articulation agreements with the University of Nicosia in Cyprus that offers an accelerated path to earn a Master of Business Administration degree and with Capital University Law School to pursue a Doctorate of Law.[23] In 2016, an average of 96% of graduates were enrolled in graduate school or employed within six months of graduation.[24]

Organization and administration

Susquehanna University consists of four schools: School of the Arts, School of Humanities, School of Natural and Social Sciences, and the Sigmund Weis School of Business.

Susquehanna University is governed by the president, a governing board of trustees, and a team of administrators.[25]

Selinsgrove Hall, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is the oldest building on campus.
Selinsgrove Hall, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is the oldest building on campus.

Rankings

Publication Rank Year References
U.S. News & World Report 117th best liberal arts college in the United States out of 222 2022 [26]
U.S. News & World Report 80th top performers on social mobility in the United States out of 216 2022 [27]
Wall Street Journal 207th best college in the United States out of 796 2022 [28]
Washington Monthly 81st best liberal arts college in the United States out of 215 2021 [29]
College Consensus Top 100 national liberal arts colleges 2022 [30]
Princeton Review Best 387 Colleges 2022 [31]
Princeton Review Best Green Colleges 2022 [32]
Princeton Review Best Northeastern Schools 2022 [33]

GO Program

The GO Program, as part of a school policy adopted in 2009, requires all Susquehanna students go off-campus for cross-cultural learning. Students have a choice between GO Short programs of 2–3 weeks or semester-long GO Long programs.[34] In 2013, the GO Program was awarded the Andrew Heiskell Award for Innovation in International Education[35]


Campus

Kurtz Lane
Kurtz Lane

The Susquehanna University campus spans 325 acres (132 ha) in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania. There are more than 50 buildings on campus, primarily in the style of Georgian architecture. The university has four buildings that are Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-certified (LEED) by the U.S. Green Building Council: two residence halls, the Natural Sciences Center, and the Admission House. [36]

Kurtz Lane, named after the founding president, is a pedestrian way that runs through the center of campus. A portion of the lower lane is lined with gingko trees.

Seibert Hall, listed on the National Register of Historic Places
Seibert Hall, listed on the National Register of Historic Places

Students are guaranteed housing all four years, and nearly all students live on campus. Students can choose from traditional corridor-style halls, suites, townhouses, apartments, and family-style houses, each requiring no more than a 10-minute walk to class.[37][38]

Selinsgrove and Seibert halls

Selinsgrove Hall is a 3+12-story brick structure constructed in 1858 in the Italianate style. The roof features a wooden cupola and the structure was previously featured on the university logo. Seibert Hall is a 2+12-story brick structure constructed in 1902 in a restrained Colonial Revival style.[39] Both Selinsgrove Hall and Seibert Hall, were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.[40]

Admission House
Admission House

Admission House

In 2017, the university dedicated a $7 million space to welcome prospective students and families. According to the Susquehanna's website, Admission House was funded through contributions from the university's Board of Trustees.[41] Unlike most other buildings on campus, the Admission House has a white facade instead of a naturally red-brick exterior. The 15,500-square-foot (1,440 m2) building was designed by architect Peter Bohlin of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson as a modern take on a barn to pay tribute to central Pennsylvania’s agricultural tradition, even though the university does not offer an agriculture academic program. [41]

The building received LEED certification with design elements that include: stormwater management and control, reduced water usage, water-efficient landscaping, optimized light control and energy performance, and indoor chemical and pollutant-source control. It also received the Award for Excellence from the American Institute of Architect’s Northeastern Pennsylvania chapter.[42]

Apfelbaum Hall

Apfelbaum Hall, Sigmund Weis School of Business entrance
Apfelbaum Hall, Sigmund Weis School of Business entrance

Apfelbaum Hall was built in 1999 and houses the Sigmund Weis School of Business and the communications department.[38]

Business students get hands-on learning in a student investment center that serves as a functioning trading room with Bloomberg Terminals that allow students to monitor and analyze financial markets in real time, and place trades on the trading platform. Students oversee a real investment portfolio in a student managed investment fund with monies allocated from the Student Government Association. Communications students have access to production facilities, including an audio, video and graphics lab and a multi-camera television studio with a green screen. They also have access to professional-quality audio and video field equipment.[38]

Susquehanna University solar array
Susquehanna University solar array

Natural Sciences Center

The Natural Sciences Center is a $32-million academic building that houses Susquehanna’s biology, chemistry, earth and environmental science, neuroscience, ecology, health care studies, and pre-professional programs.[43] It received Silver LEED certification.[43] The 81,000-square-foot (7,500 m2) building was dedicated in 2010.[44]

Solar Array

In 2018, Susquehanna University completed a 14-acre (5.7 ha) solar array with WGL Energy to supply 30 percent of the university’s electricity. At the time, it was the largest university-sponsored solar array in Pennsylvania, and one of the largest solar projects in the Commonwealth. The 12,000-panel array is estimated to produce over 5,300 megawatt hours (MWh) of electricity per year.[45]

Student life

Susquehanna University offers more than 150 student clubs and organizations, a variety of honor societies and professional organizations, and 11 Greek Life organizations.[46]

Traditions

First-Year Students' Move In Day welcomes first-year students by sending orientation team members out to carry all new students' belongings into their dorm rooms. Many faculty and staff will also assist with the move-in process.[47]

Thanksgiving Dinner is held prior to students leaving for Thanksgiving vacation. Students are served a turkey dinner by faculty, staff, and the University President.[48]

Christmas Candlelight Service is one of Susquehanna's most cherished traditions. Held in Weber Auditorium in early December, the service includes songs, readings, and prayers and finishes with everyone in attendance holding a lit candle.[49]

Twas the Night Before Christmas in which students come to the campus center dressed in their pajamas and indulge in cookies and cocoa while enjoying a reading of the classic Christmas tale.[50]

Clubs and organizations

Academic interest

There are a variety of academic interest clubs and organizations in the fields of business, education, music, sciences, foreign languages, and communications.[51]

Publications and media

WQSU radio station
WQSU radio station

Performing arts

In addition to the student-run clubs and organizations that focused on music and dance, many ensembles are university sponsored and count toward major or elective credit requirements.[59]

The University Choir, Chorale, and Chamber Singers are the three vocal performance groups open to all students by audition, and the instrumental offerings (many of which are also open to all students through an audition process) range from small ensembles to pep bands to the University Symphonic Band.[60]

The theatre department also holds performances throughout the year with four large and several small productions a year.[61]

Religious life

There are eight religious life organizations at Susquehanna. In addition, students as well as the general public have the opportunity to attend Lutheran services held Sunday mornings on campus.[62]

Volunteering/service

There are ten clubs and organizations that focus on volunteering or service.[63]

Student programs

Susquehanna's on-campus, student-run night club is TRAX. The facility offers a stage for live bands, comedians and other performers as well as a dance floor, bar, pool tables, an outside patio, and a DJ booth.[64]

Susquehanna University also has Charlie's Coffeehouse, a student-run café on campus named after the university's benefactor, Charles Degenstein. Students work as baristas, while the management team consists of five students who are responsible for the coffee shop's finances, marketing, programming, stocking, and managerial duties. This non-alcoholic venue offers a variety of programming every night of the week. Charlie's also works in partnership with the student activities committee to bring in outside entertainers and host movies before they are released to the general public.[65]

Greek life

There are four NPC sororities: (Alpha Delta Pi, Kappa Delta, Sigma Kappa and Zeta Tau Alpha); five NIC fraternities: (Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Theta Chi, Pi Kappa Phi and Phi Mu Delta); and two NPHC organizations: (Sigma Gamma Rho and Phi Beta Sigma).[66]

Athletics

River Hawks varsity teams
Sport Men's Women's
Baseball
Green tickY
Basketball
Green tickY
Green tickY
Cheerleading
Green tickY
Cross Country
Green tickY
Green tickY
Field Hockey
Green tickY
Football
Green tickY
Golf
Green tickY
Green tickY
Lacrosse
Green tickY
Green tickY
Soccer
Green tickY
Green tickY
Softball
Green tickY
Swimming & Diving
Green tickY
Green tickY
Tennis
Green tickY
Green tickY
Track and field (indoor)
Green tickY
Green tickY
Track and field (outdoor)
Green tickY
Green tickY
Volleyball
Green tickY

Susquehanna competes in 23 varsity sports in Division III of the NCAA. Most sports compete as part of the Landmark Conference with other Northeastern colleges, except for football, which competes in the Centennial Conference through 2022.[67][68][69] Cheerleading is Susquehanna's 24th varsity team.[70]

Stagg Field at Arthur Stadium for football, and track and field
Stagg Field at Arthur Stadium for football, and track and field

The athletics complex includes a 51,000-square-foot (4,700 m2) field house, 3,500-seat Amos Alonzo Stagg Field at Doug Arthur Stadium, Douglas Arthur '49 Field, Clyde H. Jacobs Fitness Center, 1,100-seat Orlando W. Houts Gymnasium, a natatorium with a 25-yard swimming and diving pool, tennis courts, racquetball courts, and Sassafras Softball Field and a multipurpose field. [71]

In 2022, Susquehanna won the Landmark Conference President's Trophy for the best overall athletics program, which is based on conference regular-season and postseason competition. It was the fifth time Susquehanna won the trophy, tying it with Moravian University, as one of two conference teams to most often win the trophy since it was created in 2008. [72]

The football team competes in two annual trophy contests. The Goal Post Trophy goes to the winner of the annual football game with rival Juniata College.[73] Susquehanna football also plays Lycoming College for the Amos Alonzo Stagg's hat (bronzed) trophy.[74]

In October 2015, Susquehanna University's board of trustees elected to replace the Crusaders nickname and mascot.[75] On April 2, 2016, the University announced River Hawks as the new nickname.[76] “Benny the Hawk” was introduced on Oct. 29, 2016 as the new mascot.[77]

Susquehanna offers club sports and intramural sports that are free to all students.[78]

Notable alumni

Notable faculty and administration

References

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Coordinates: 40°48′00″N 76°52′26″W / 40.8°N 76.874°W / 40.8; -76.874