Warsaw
Downtown Warsaw 2020
Downtown Warsaw 2020
Location of Warsaw, Virginia
Location of Warsaw, Virginia
Coordinates: 37°57′27″N 76°45′30″W / 37.95750°N 76.75833°W / 37.95750; -76.75833
CountryUnited States
StateVirginia
CountyRichmond
Government
 • TypeCouncil - Manager
 • MayorRandall L. Phelps
 • Town ManagerJoseph N. Quesenberry
 • Police ChiefTrey Blake
Area
 • Total3.05 sq mi (7.91 km2)
 • Land3.05 sq mi (7.91 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
131 ft (40 m)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total1,637
 • Estimate 
(2022)[2]
2,281
 • Density545.66/sq mi (206.95/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP code
22572
Area code804
FIPS code51-83168[3]
GNIS ID1500279[4]
WebsiteTown website

Warsaw is an incorporated town in and the county seat of Richmond County, Virginia, United States.[5] The population was 1,637 at the 2020 census and is estimated to be 2,281 as of 2022.

History

Prior to English colonization, the area of Warsaw, Virginia was occupied by a group of Rappahannock Native Americans, who would fish on the nearby creeks for shad and herring.[6] By 1667, the Rappahannock people had been forced to sell all their land north of the Rappahannock River to English settlers, including the modern site of Warsaw.[6]

After the division of the Old Rappahannock County in 1692, Richmond County was created. The new county had its seat at Richmond Court House, which was originally along the shores of the Rappahannock River. The site of Richmond Court House was moved inland to modern Warsaw in 1730, and the modern court house was built in 1748.[7] The area was also the home of Robert Wormeley Carter, who represented Richmond County in the Virginia House of Burgesses and the Continental Congress as a supporter of the American Revolution; he owned the historic house of Sabine Hall, located near Richmond Court House.[8] Additionally, the region was subjected to intense British raids during the War of 1812, and many free men of the town were rallied in its defense from the British army.[9] During this time, the area's economy grew reliant on tobacco, as a small group of wealthy planters grew the crop with the labor of indentured settlers and enslaved Africans.[10][11]

In January 1832, the town's name was changed to Warsaw, after the news of "great uprisings in Old World Warsaw" in 1830 and 1831 reached residents. This change was due to local popular support for the November Uprising in Poland.[12] As with Richmond Court House, a number of other small towns in the United States changed their names to Warsaw at this time, such as Warsaw, Kentucky.[13]

Following the Civil War, the area's newly emancipated freedmen made efforts to secure their own churches and schools.[14] Ultimately, the region's schools and churches would be formally desegregated with the passage of the Civil Rights Act, though all schools in the region would not be fully integrated until the 1970s.[15]

Today, Warsaw is one of many small towns in Virginia's Northern Neck region. The town prides itself on its schools, natural beauty, and quality of life.[16]

Geography

Warsaw is located at 37°57′27″N 76°45′30″W / 37.95750°N 76.75833°W / 37.95750; -76.75833 (37.957617, −76.758302).[17]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 3.0 square miles (7.9 km2), all of it land.

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Warsaw has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[18]

Climate data for Warsaw, Virginia (1991–2020 normals, extremes 1893–present)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 82
(28)
81
(27)
94
(34)
97
(36)
99
(37)
105
(41)
106
(41)
103
(39)
105
(41)
100
(38)
85
(29)
82
(28)
106
(41)
Mean daily maximum °F (°C) 46.8
(8.2)
50.4
(10.2)
58.5
(14.7)
69.7
(20.9)
77.1
(25.1)
84.3
(29.1)
88.4
(31.3)
86.4
(30.2)
80.4
(26.9)
70.4
(21.3)
59.5
(15.3)
50.0
(10.0)
68.5
(20.3)
Daily mean °F (°C) 37.6
(3.1)
40.3
(4.6)
47.5
(8.6)
57.8
(14.3)
66.2
(19.0)
73.9
(23.3)
78.2
(25.7)
76.2
(24.6)
70.1
(21.2)
59.5
(15.3)
49.3
(9.6)
41.2
(5.1)
58.1
(14.5)
Mean daily minimum °F (°C) 28.5
(−1.9)
30.2
(−1.0)
36.5
(2.5)
45.8
(7.7)
55.3
(12.9)
63.5
(17.5)
68.1
(20.1)
66.1
(18.9)
59.8
(15.4)
48.6
(9.2)
39.1
(3.9)
32.3
(0.2)
47.8
(8.8)
Record low °F (°C) −6
(−21)
−5
(−21)
5
(−15)
14
(−10)
29
(−2)
38
(3)
47
(8)
44
(7)
30
(−1)
24
(−4)
13
(−11)
−3
(−19)
−6
(−21)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.02
(77)
2.60
(66)
3.66
(93)
3.18
(81)
3.90
(99)
4.37
(111)
4.73
(120)
5.01
(127)
4.15
(105)
3.98
(101)
3.29
(84)
3.30
(84)
45.19
(1,148)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 4.4
(11)
3.3
(8.4)
1.4
(3.6)
0.1
(0.25)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.1
(0.25)
2.2
(5.6)
11.5
(29)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 8.9 8.1 9.3 10.4 11.3 11.0 10.4 9.6 9.0 9.3 8.4 9.1 114.8
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 1.6 1.5 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.9 4.6
Source: NOAA[19][20]

Demographics

Racial composition as of 2020 (NH = Non-Hispanic)[21]
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2020 % 2020
White alone (NH) 1033 74.21%
Black or African American alone (NH) 479 17.37%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 1 0.26%
Asian alone (NH) 10 1.32%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 0 0.00%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 1 0.00%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 44 3.42%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 69 3.42%
Total 1,637 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 1,375 people, 445 households, and 233 families living in the town. The population density was 453.0 people per square mile (174.6/km2). There were 468 housing units at an average density of 154.2 per square mile (59.4/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 67.64% White, 29.38% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 1.53% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.36% of the population.

There were 445 households, out of which 22.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.1% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 47.6% were non-families. 45.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 24.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.01 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 13.3% under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, and 29.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females, there were 102.2 males. For every 100 females aged 18 and over, there were 103.8 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $28,971, and the median income for a family was $44,167. Males had a median income of $40,052 versus $23,661 for females. The per capita income for the town was $21,392. About 12.4% of families and 16.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.6% of those under age 18 and 16.4% of those age 65 or over.

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1880115
1950435
196054926.2%
1970511−6.9%
198077150.9%
199096124.6%
20001,37543.1%
20101,51210.0%
20201,6378.3%
2022 (est.)2,281[2]39.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[22]

Economy

St. John's Episcopal Church in Warsaw

Warsaw serves as the hub of Richmond County and provides a wide array of economic opportunities. As of 2017, 40% of the town's employment came from educational, health, and social services.[23] Educationally, the town is home to an elementary and middle school, a high school, a technical school, and a campus of the Rappahannock Community College.[24]

Warsaw is also the location of the Northern Neck Regional Jail, which was completed in 1995. The jail employs 100 people and has a capacity of 460 inmates. Its most recent addition was completed in 2000.[25]

The area also uses its historic importance to promote tourism.[23] Historic sites nearby include Menokin, the former home of Francis Lightfoot Lee, Mount Airy and Sabine Hall. A former plantation estate, Belle Mount, is currently operated as a vineyard and winery within a few miles of Warsaw town limits. In addition to Menokin, Mount Airy, and Sabine Hall, Grove Mount and the Richmond County Courthouse are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The formerly listed Bladensfield was destroyed by fire in 1996.[26]

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  6. ^ a b "Rappahannock Indians Historical Marker". www.hmdb.org. Retrieved June 16, 2023.
  7. ^ "Richmond County Courthouse". www.virginia.org. Retrieved June 15, 2023.
  8. ^ "Francis Lightfoot Lee and Patriots of the Revolution: 1776 - 1781". AWordPressSite. Retrieved June 15, 2023.
  9. ^ Ryland, Elizabeth (1976). Richmond County Virginia Review: Commemorating the Bicentennial. Richmond County Board of Supervisors. p. 442.
  10. ^ "Richmond County Established". AWordPressSite. Retrieved June 15, 2023.
  11. ^ Ryland, Elizabeth (1976). Richmond County, Virginia: A Review Commemorating the Bicentennial. Richmond County Board of Supervisors. pp. 26–27.
  12. ^ "Richmond Court House To Warsaw". AWordPressSite. Retrieved June 15, 2023.
  13. ^ (in English) Francene Barber; David Jett; Brenda Harhai (2010). Warsaw. Images of America. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia Publishing. pp. 30, 130. ISBN 978-0-7385-6776-1. LCCN 2009921315.
  14. ^ "Reconstruction Period". AWordPressSite. Retrieved June 16, 2023.
  15. ^ "Desegregation". AWordPressSite. Retrieved June 16, 2023.
  16. ^ "Town of Warsaw - Home". www.townofwarsaw.com. Retrieved June 16, 2023.
  17. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  18. ^ Climate Summary for Warsaw, Virginia
  19. ^ "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  20. ^ "Station: Warsaw 2 NW, VA". U.S. Climate Normals 2020: U.S. Monthly Climate Normals (1991-2020). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  21. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved June 16, 2023.
  22. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  23. ^ a b "Town of Warsaw - Economic Development". www.townofwarsaw.com. Retrieved June 16, 2023.
  24. ^ "Town of Warsaw - Economic Development". townofwarsaw.com. Retrieved June 16, 2023.
  25. ^ "Northern Neck Regional Jail - History of the Jail". Northern Neck Regional Jail. Retrieved June 16, 2018.
  26. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.