1950 Philadelphia Phillies
1950 National League Champion
Philadelphia Philies 1950 Wiz Kids.jpg
Granny Hamner, Del Ennis, and Richie Ashburn of the 1950 Phillies "Whiz Kids" in a promotional photo.
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)R. R. M. Carpenter, Jr.
General manager(s)R. R. M. Carpenter, Jr.
Manager(s)Eddie Sawyer
Local televisionWPTZ
WCAU
WFIL
(Bill Campbell)
Local radioWPEN
(Bill Brundige, Gene Kelly)
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The 1950 Philadelphia Phillies won the National League pennant by two games over the Brooklyn Dodgers. Nicknamed the "Whiz Kids" because of the youth of their roster, they went on to lose the World Series to the New York Yankees in four straight games.

Previous off-season

On January 10, 1950, owner Bob Carpenter announced that the club had officially abandoned the nickname "Blue Jays" and would be the "Phillies". The club had adopted the nickname in 1944 but it never caught on among fans.[4]

City Series

The pre-season 1950 City Series was planned for three games prior to Opening Day. Snow flurries and cold weather in Philadelphia caused the cancellation of the first game. The Athletics beat the Phillies 7–4 and the Phillies won the following game 11–2.[5]

Regular season

Main article: Whiz Kids (baseball)

Season standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Philadelphia Phillies 91 63 0.591 48–29 43–34
Brooklyn Dodgers 89 65 0.578 2 48–30 41–35
New York Giants 86 68 0.558 5 44–32 42–36
Boston Braves 83 71 0.539 8 46–31 37–40
St. Louis Cardinals 78 75 0.510 12½ 48–28 30–47
Cincinnati Reds 66 87 0.431 24½ 38–38 28–49
Chicago Cubs 64 89 0.418 26½ 35–42 29–47
Pittsburgh Pirates 57 96 0.373 33½ 33–44 24–52

Record vs. opponents


Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS BR CHC CIN NYG PHI PIT STL
Boston 9–13 9–13 17–5 13–9 9–13–1 15–7–1 11–11
Brooklyn 13–9 10–12 12–10 12–10 11–11–1 19–3 12–10
Chicago 13–9 12–10 4–17 5–17 9–13–1 11–11 10–12
Cincinnati 5–17 10–12 17–4 11–11 4–18 12–10 7–15
New York 9–13 10–12 17–5 11–11 12–10 16–6 11–11
Philadelphia 13–9–1 11–11–1 13–9–1 18–4 10–12 14–8 12–10
Pittsburgh 7–15–1 3–19 11–11 10–12 6–16 8–14 12–9
St. Louis 11–11 10–12 12–10 15–7 11–11 10–12 9–12


Game log

Legend
  Phillies win
  Phillies loss
  Phillies tie
  Postponement
Bold Phillies team member
1950 Game Log[6]
Overall Record: 91–63–3
April (6–6–1)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
1 April 18 Dodgers 9–1 Robin Roberts (1–0) Don Newcombe (0–1) None 29,074 1–0
2 April 19 Dodgers 5–7 Bud Podbielan (1–0) Russ Meyer (0–1) None 8,450 1–1
April 20 Dodgers Postponed (rain);[7] Makeup: September 8
3 April 21 @ Braves 2–2 (7)[a] None None None 7,308 1–1–1
4 April 22 @ Braves 2–3 Warren Spahn (2–0) Curt Simmons (0–1) None 7,607 1–2–1
5 April 23 (1) @ Braves 3–4 Johnny Sain (2–0) Blix Donnelly (0–1) None see 2nd game 1–3–1
6 April 23 (2) @ Braves 6–5 Jim Konstanty (1–0) Bobby Hogue (0–1) None 10,302 2–3–1
April 24 @ Giants Postponed (rain and cold);[8] Makeup: August 20
7 April 25 @ Giants 4–8 Larry Jansen (1–1) Russ Meyer (0–2) None 4,940 2–4–1
8 April 26 @ Dodgers 4–5 (10)[b] Willie Ramsdell (1–0) Blix Donnelly (0–2) None 21,556 2–5–1
9 April 27 @ Dodgers 9–2 Robin Roberts (2–0) Preacher Roe (1–1) None 5,488 3–5–1
10 April 28 Braves 6–1 Curt Simmons (1–1) Johnny Sain (2–1) None 22,231 4–5–1
11 April 29 Braves 2–1 Bob Miller (1–0) Vern Bickford (0–2) None 5,064 5–5–1
12 April 30 (1) Braves 1–4 Normie Roy (1–0) Russ Meyer (0–3) None see 2nd game 5–6–1
13 April 30 (2) Braves 9–3 Robin Roberts (3–0) Dick Donovan (0–2) None 14,201 6–6–1
May (17–9)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
14 May 2 @ Cubs 8–10 Bob Rush (2–0) Ken Heintzelman (0–1) Dutch Leonard (2) 6,279 6–7–1
15 May 3 @ Cubs 5–2 Ken Johnson (1–0) Johnny Klippstein (0–1) Jim Konstanty (1) 4,071 7–7–1
16 May 4 @ Cardinals 9–6 Curt Simmons (2–1) Gerry Staley (1–2) Jim Konstanty (2) 9,871 8–7–1
17 May 5 @ Cardinals 2–3 Harry Brecheen (2–1) Robin Roberts (3–1) None 12,302 8–8–1
18 May 6 @ Cardinals 11–7 Bob Miller (2–0) Max Lanier (1–1) Jim Konstanty (3) 9,730 9–8–1
19 May 7 (1) @ Reds 6–0 Ken Heintzelman (1–1) Howie Fox (1–2) None see 2nd game 10–8–1
20 May 7 (2) @ Reds 6–4 Curt Simmons (3–1) Ewell Blackwell (1–1) None 13,313 11–8–1
21 May 8 @ Reds 6–5 Ken Johnson (2–0) Herm Wehmeier (1–3) Bob Miller (1) 5,141 12–8–1
May 10 @ Pirates Postponed (rain);[9] Makeup: July 24[10]
22 May 11 @ Pirates 3–2 Robin Roberts (4–1) Murry Dickson (2–3) None 28,452 13–8–1
23 May 13 Giants 7–1 Curt Simmons (4–1) Dave Koslo (1–3) None 12,596 14–8–1
24 May 14 (1) Giants 3–4 Larry Jansen (2–3) Ken Heintzelman (1–2) None see 2nd game 14–9–1
25 May 14 (2) Giants 9–7[c] Jim Konstanty (2–0) Sheldon Jones (1–4) Robin Roberts (1) 25,769 15–9–1
26 May 16 Reds 1–0 Robin Roberts (5–1) Ewell Blackwell (2–2) None 16,041 16–9–1
27 May 17 Reds 5–4 Ken Johnson (3–0) Herm Wehmeier (1–4) None 12,655 17–9–1
May 18 Reds Postponed (rain and wet grounds);[11][12] Makeup: August 1 as a traditional double-header
May 19 Cubs Postponed (rain);[13] Makeup: July 25 as a traditional double-header
28 May 20 Cubs 2–7 Bob Rush (5–0) Curt Simmons (4–2) None 4,020 17–10–1
29 May 21 (1) Cardinals 5–6 Gerry Staley (3–3) Robin Roberts (5–2) Howie Pollet (1) see 2nd game 17–11–1
30 May 21 (2) Cardinals 4–2 Curt Simmons (5–2) Cloyd Boyer (1–1) None 32,986 18–11–1
31 May 23 Pirates 0–6 Bill Macdonald (1–0) Russ Meyer (0–4) None 12,428 18–12–1
32 May 24 Pirates 6–3 Jim Konstanty (3–0) Bill Werle (3–2) None 18,993 19–12–1
33 May 25 Pirates 3–0 Bob Miller (3–0) Cliff Chambers (5–4) None 5,265 20–12–1
34 May 26 @ Giants 3–2 Robin Roberts (6–2) Jack Kramer (0–2) None 17,782 21–12–1
35 May 27 @ Giants 8–5 Curt Simmons (6–2) Sheldon Jones (2–6) Jim Konstanty (4) 13,273 22–12–1
36 May 28 (1) @ Giants 5–2 (11) Jim Konstanty (4–0) Andy Hansen (0–1) None 23,956 23–12–1
37 May 28 (2) @ Giants 1–3 Dave Koslo (3–4) Ken Heintzelman (1–3) None 23,986 23–13–1
38 May 30 (1) @ Dodgers 6–7 (10) Preacher Roe (5–2) Jim Konstanty (4–1) None 18,884 23–14–1
39 May 30 (2) @ Dodgers 4–6 Jack Banta (4–1) Russ Meyer (0–5) Ralph Branca (1) 34,700 23–15–1
June (14–11)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
40 June 1 @ Cubs 8–4 Curt Simmons (7–2) Frank Hiller (3–1) Jim Konstanty (5) 9,812 24–15–1
June 2 @ Cubs Postponed (wet grounds);[14] Makeup: July 18 as a traditional double-header
41 June 3 @ Cubs 6–2 Bubba Church (1–0) Bob Rush (6–2) Jim Konstanty (6) not available 25–15–1
42 June 4 @ Cardinals 2–6 Max Lanier (4–2) Ken Heintzelman (1–4) None 30,956 25–16–1
43 June 5 @ Cardinals 6–5 Robin Roberts (7–2) Red Munger (2–2) None 15,604 26–16–1
44 June 6 @ Cardinals 4–5 Howie Pollet (5–3) Curt Simmons (7–3) None 16,328 26–17–1
45 June 7 @ Reds 4–0 Bob Miller (4–0) Willie Ramsdell (2–6) None 8,220 27–17–1
46 June 8 @ Reds 4–8 Ken Raffensberger (5–5) Russ Meyer (0–6) None 4,102 27–18–1
June 9 @ Reds Postponed (rain);[15] Makeup: July 22 as a traditional double-header
June 10 @ Pirates Postponed (rain);[16] Makeup: July 19 as a traditional double-header
47 June 11 (1) @ Pirates 7–6 Jim Konstanty (5–1) Vern Law (0–1) None see 2nd game 28–18–1
48 June 11 (2) @ Pirates 4–5 (12) Bill Werle (4–4) Blix Donnelly (0–3) None 33,217 28–19–1
49 June 13 Cardinals 3–6 Harry Brecheen (4–3) Curt Simmons (7–4) None 28,587 28–20–1
50 June 14 Cardinals 2–4 Max Lanier (6–2) Ken Heintzelman (1–5) None 15,563 28–21–1
June 15 Cardinals Postponed (rain);[17] Makeup: August 7
June 16 Reds Postponed (rain);[18] Makeup: August 3
51 June 17 Reds 5–2 Robin Roberts (8–2) Ewell Blackwell (4–7) None 7,669 29–21–1
52 June 18 (1) Reds 4–3 Curt Simmons (8–4) Herm Wehmeier (3–8) None see 2nd game 30–21–1
53 June 18 (2) Reds 4–2 Bob Miller (5–0) Howie Fox (1–5) None 20,495 31–21–1
54 June 20 Pirates 7–3 Russ Meyer (1–6) Vern Law (0–2) None 13,597 32–21–1
55 June 21 Pirates 3–5 Bill Macdonald (3–1) Robin Roberts (8–3) Bill Werle (6) 18,632 32–22–1
56 June 22 Pirates 7–4 Bob Miller (6–0) Hank Borowy (0–2) None 5,326 33–22–1
57 June 23 Cubs 4–7 Doyle Lade (3–1) Curt Simmons (8–5) Paul Minner (3) 21,030 33–23–1
58 June 24 Cubs 5–4 Russ Meyer (2–6) Frank Hiller (4–2) Jim Konstanty (7) 7,195 34–23–1
59 June 25 (1) Cubs 8–11 Johnny Schmitz (8–3) Jim Konstanty (5–2) Doyle Lade (2) see 2nd game 34–24–1
60 June 25 (2) Cubs 2–1 Robin Roberts (9–3) Bob Rush (8–6) None 18,484 35–24–1
61 June 27 @ Braves 3–2 Curt Simmons (9–5) Warren Spahn (9–8) Jim Konstanty (8) 13,361 36–24–1
62 June 28 @ Braves 1–3 Johnny Sain (10–5) Russ Meyer (2–7) None 18,724 36–25–1
63 June 29 @ Braves 2–3 Vern Bickford (7–6) Ken Heintzelman (1–6) None 13,980 36–26–1
64 June 30 Dodgers 8–5 Jim Konstanty (6–2) Don Newcombe (7–3) Bubba Church (1) 31,555 37–26–1
July (21–13–1)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
65 July 1 Dodgers 6–4 Bob Miller (7–0) Bud Podbielan (5–4) Jim Konstanty (9) 18,761 38–26–1
66 July 2 (1) Dodgers 6–4 Russ Meyer (3–7) Ralph Branca (2–4) Jim Konstanty (10) see 2nd game 39–26–1
67 July 2 (2) Dodgers 8–8 (10)[d] None None None 35,118 39–26–2
68 July 3 Braves 1–3 Vern Bickford (8–6) Ken Heintzelman (1–7) None 11,162 39–27–2
69 July 4 (1) Braves 14–5 Robin Roberts (10–3) Normie Roy (3–3) None see 2nd game 40–27–2
70 July 4 (2) Braves 9–12 Bobby Hogue (3–2) Jim Konstanty (6–3) Warren Spahn (1) 21,190 40–28–2
71 July 5 Giants 10–3 Russ Meyer (4–7) Clint Hartung (3–3) None 17,771 41–28–2
72 July 6 Giants 9–6 Bob Miller (8–0) Sheldon Jones (6–10) Jim Konstanty (11) 8,709 42–28–2
73 July 7 @ Dodgers 7–2 Curt Simmons (10–5) Ralph Branca (2–5) None 28,585 43–28–2
74 July 8 @ Dodgers 4–1 Jim Konstanty (7–3) Don Newcombe (7–5) None 20,714 44–28–2
75 July 9 @ Dodgers 3–7 Erv Palica (2–1) Russ Meyer (4–8) None 20,895 44–29–2
July 11 1950 Major League Baseball All-Star Game at Comiskey Park in Chicago
76 July 13 @ Cardinals 3–2 Curt Simmons (11–5) Howie Pollet (9–6) None 24,471 45–29–2
77 July 14 @ Cardinals 2–4 Gerry Staley (8–6) Robin Roberts (10–4) None 25,529 45–30–2
78 July 15 @ Cardinals 6–8 Fred Martin (3–1) Jim Konstanty (7–4) Al Brazle (5) 20,219 45–31–2
79 July 16 (1) @ Cubs 0–8 Monk Dubiel (4–3) Russ Meyer (4–9) None see 2nd game 45–32–2
80 July 16 (2) @ Cubs 3–10 Doyle Lade (5–3) Bob Miller (8–1) None 35,710 45–33–2
July 17 @ Cubs Postponed (rain);[19] Makeup: August 28 (which later became a traditional double-header)
81 July 18 (1) @ Cubs 2–5 Paul Minner (4–5) Robin Roberts (10–5) None see 2nd game 45–34–2
82 July 18 (2) @ Cubs 8–3 Bubba Church (2–0) Bob Rush (9–10) None 28,861 46–34–2
83 July 19 (1) @ Pirates 3–2 (11) Curt Simmons (12–5) Bill Werle (5–8) Jim Konstanty (12) see 2nd game 47–34–2
84 July 19 (2) @ Pirates 2–4 Bill Macdonald (4–3) Russ Meyer (4–10) None 18,953 47–35–2
85 July 20 @ Pirates 8–10 Murry Dickson (5–10) Blix Donnelly (0–4) None 7,291 47–36–2
86 July 21 @ Pirates 4–1 Bubba Church (3–0) Mel Queen (3–8) None 34,016 48–36–2
87 July 22 (1) @ Reds 2–0 Robin Roberts (11–5) Willie Ramsdell (5–8) None see 2nd game 49–36–2
88 July 22 (2) @ Reds 1–6 Howie Fox (5–6) Ken Heintzelman (1–8) None 13,215 49–37–2
89 July 23 (1) @ Reds 12–4 Curt Simmons (13–5) Ken Raffensberger (9–11) None see 2nd game 50–37–2
90 July 23 (2) @ Reds 7–4 Russ Meyer (5–10) Ewell Blackwell (8–10) Jim Konstanty (13) 28,831 51–37–2
91 July 24 @ Pirates 1–2 (6)[20] Bill Macdonald (5–3) Bob Miller (8–2) None 15,431 51–38–2
92 July 25 (1) Cubs 7–0 Bubba Church (4–0) Johnny Klippstein (1–3) None see 2nd game 52–38–2
93 July 25 (2) Cubs 1–0 Robin Roberts (12–5) Bob Rush (9–11) None 32,726 53–38–2
94 July 26 Cubs 6–4 Milo Candini (1–0) Monk Dubiel (4–4) Jim Konstanty (14) 11,693 54–38–2
95 July 27 Cubs 13–3 Curt Simmons (14–5) Doyle Lade (5–5) None 7,343 55–38–2
96 July 28 Pirates 4–1 Bob Miller (9–2) Bill Macdonald (5–4) None 7,343 56–38–2
97 July 29 Pirates 4–7 Bill Werle (6–8) Bubba Church (4–1) None 10,252 56–39–2
98 July 30 (1) Pirates 10–0 Robin Roberts (13–5) Mel Queen (4–9) None see 2nd game 57–39–2
99 July 30 (2) Pirates 4–2 Jim Konstanty (8–4) Murry Dickson (5–11) Russ Meyer (1) 21,411 58–39–2
August (20–8–1)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
100 August 1 (1) Reds 6–4 Bob Miller (10–2) Frank Smith (1–4) Jim Konstanty (15) see 2nd game 59–39–2
101 August 1 (2) Reds 1–4 Ewell Blackwell (10–11) Curt Simmons (14–6) None 34,728 59–40–2
102 August 2 Reds 2–0 Bubba Church (5–1) Willie Ramsdell (5–9) None 8,540 60–40–2
August 3 Reds Postponed (rain);[21] Makeup: September 15 as a traditional double-header
103 August 4 Cardinals 4–2 Robin Roberts (14–5) Howie Pollet (10–9) None 27,691 61–40–2
104 August 5 Cardinals 2–1 Russ Meyer (6–10) Gerry Staley (10–9) Jim Konstanty (16) 21,869 62–40–2
105 August 6 (1) Cardinals 1–7 Cloyd Boyer (5–2) Bob Miller (10–3) None see 2nd game 62–41–2
106 August 6 (2) Cardinals 0–2 Max Lanier (10–4) Bubba Church (5–2) None 31,914 62–42–2
107 August 7 Cardinals 9–0 Ken Johnson (4–0) Harry Brecheen (6–8) None 25,251 63–42–2
108 August 8 @ Dodgers 6–5 Robin Roberts (15–5) Don Newcombe (11–7) Jim Konstanty (17) 32,886 64–42–2
109 August 9 @ Dodgers 5–4 Russ Meyer (7–10) Erv Palica (4–4) Jim Konstanty (18) 19,644 65–42–2
110 August 10 Giants 6–5 (10) Jim Konstanty (9–4) Dave Koslo (11–9) None 33,032 66–42–2
111 August 11 Giants 1–3 Sal Maglie (10–3) Curt Simmons (14–7) None 15,895 66–43–2
112 August 12 Giants 5–4 (11)[e] Jim Konstanty (10–4) Dave Koslo (11–10) None 14,955 67–43–2
113 August 13 Giants 0–2 Jim Hearn (4–2) Ken Johnson (4–1) None 19,644 67–44–2
114 August 15 Braves 9–1 Curt Simmons (15–7) Johnny Sain (16–9) Jim Konstanty (19) 32,215 68–44–2
115 August 16 Braves 5–1 Robin Roberts (16–5) Vern Bickford (14–9) None 23,846 69–44–2
116 August 18 @ Giants 4–7 Jim Hearn (5–2) Russ Meyer (7–11) None 26,086 69–45–2
August 19 @ Giants Postponed (rain);[22] Makeup: September 27 as a traditional double-header
August 20 (1) @ Giants Postponed (rain);[23][24] Makeup: August 21
August 20 (2) @ Giants Postponed (rain);[23][24] Makeup: September 28 as a traditional double-header
117 August 21 @ Giants 4–0 Curt Simmons (16–7) Larry Jansen (13–9) None 19,320 70–45–2
118 August 22 @ Reds 4–3 Robin Roberts (17–5) Ken Raffensberger (12–14) None 11,660 71–45–2
119 August 23 @ Reds 6–4 Bob Miller (11–3) Willie Ramsdell (6–11) Jim Konstanty (20) 5,964 72–45–2
120 August 24 @ Pirates 4–2 Bubba Church (6–2) Vern Law (3–6) None 9,096 73–45–2
121 August 25 @ Pirates 9–7 (15) Jim Konstanty (11–4) Cliff Chambers (10–14) None 25,686 74–45–2
122 August 26 @ Pirates 4–14 Murry Dickson (7–13) Robin Roberts (17–6) None 12,157 74–46–2
123 August 27 (1) @ Cubs 6–1 Bubba Church (7–2) Paul Minner (7–9) None see 2nd game 75–46–2
124 August 27 (2) @ Cubs 4–4 (11)[f] None None None 38,944 75–46–3
125 August 28 (1) @ Cubs 5–7 Dutch Leonard (4–1) Curt Simmons (16–8) Johnny Vander Meer (1) see 2nd game 75–47–3
126 August 28 (2) @ Cubs 9–5 Jim Konstanty (12–4) Johnny Klippstein (1–8) None 19,756 76–47–3
127 August 29 @ Cardinals 5–3 Robin Roberts (18–6) Howie Pollet (12–11) Jim Konstanty (21) 27,058 77–47–3
128 August 30 @ Cardinals 9–8 Jim Konstanty (13–4) Gerry Staley (11–11) Curt Simmons (1) 17,232 78–47–3
September (12–16)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
129 September 1 @ Braves 7–3 Bubba Church (8–2) Max Surkont (2–1) None 14,908 79–47–3
130 September 2 @ Braves 2–0 Curt Simmons (17–8) Johnny Sain (17–11) None 17,230 80–47–3
September 3 @ Braves Postponed (rain);[25] Makeup: September 25 as a traditional double-header
131 September 4 (1) Giants 0–2 Jim Hearn (8–2) Robin Roberts (18–7) None see 2nd game 80–48–3
132 September 4 (2) Giants 0–9 Sal Maglie (14–3) Bob Miller (11–4) None 33,988 80–49–3
133 September 6 (1) Dodgers 0–2 Don Newcombe (17–8) Bubba Church (8–3) None see 2nd game 80–50–3
134 September 6 (2) Dodgers 2–3 Dan Bankhead (7–4) Jim Konstanty (13–5) None 32,279 80–51–3
135 September 7 Dodgers 2–3 Carl Erskine (3–4) Robin Roberts (18–8) Ralph Branca (6) 24,624 80–52–3
136 September 8 Dodgers 4–3 Russ Meyer (8–11) Erv Palica (8–7) None 14,727 81–52–3
137 September 9 Braves 7–6 Jim Konstanty (14–5) Dave Cole (0–1) None 15,329 82–52–3
138 September 10 Braves 1–3 (5)[26] Johnny Sain (18–12) Bubba Church (8–4) None 14,684 82–53–3
139 September 12 Cardinals 1–0 Robin Roberts (19–8) Max Lanier (11–7) None 20,864 83–53–3
September 13 Cardinals Postponed (rain);[27] Makeup: September 14
140 September 14 Cardinals 3–2 Jim Konstanty (15–5) Al Brazle (10–7) None 17,142 84–53–3
141 September 15 (1) Reds 2–1 Ken Heintzelman (2–8) Willie Ramsdell (8–13) None see 2nd game 85–53–3
142 September 15 (2) Reds 8–7 (19)[28] Blix Donnelly (1–4) Eddie Erautt (3–2) None 20,673 86–53–3
143 September 16 Reds 0–2 Ewell Blackwell (15–15) Bob Miller (11–5) None 12,052 86–54–3
144 September 17 Pirates 5–3 Russ Meyer (9–11) Bill Werle (8–14) Jim Konstanty (22) 20,031 87–54–3
145 September 19 Cubs 0–1 Frank Hiller (11–5) Robin Roberts (19–9) None 20,404 87–55–3
146 September 20 Cubs 9–6 Jim Konstanty (16–5) Johnny Schmitz (10–15) None 4,259 88–55–3
147 September 23 Dodgers 2–3 Don Newcombe (19–10) Robin Roberts (19–10) None 22,602 88–56–3
148 September 24 Dodgers 0–11 Erv Palica (12–7) Bubba Church (8–5) None 32,190 88–57–3
149 September 25 (1) @ Braves 12–4 Ken Heintzelman (3–8) Warren Spahn (21–16) None see 2nd game 89–57–3
150 September 25 (2) @ Braves 3–5 Max Surkont (5–1) Jim Konstanty (16–6) None 7,451 89–58–3
151 September 26 @ Braves 8–7 Blix Donnelly (2–4) Bob Hall (0–2) None 1,987 90–58–3
152 September 27 (1) @ Giants 7–8 (10) Dave Koslo (13–15) Jim Konstanty (16–7) None see 2nd game 90–59–3
153 September 27 (2) @ Giants 0–5 Jim Hearn (11–4) Bubba Church (8–6) None 10,004 90–60–3
154 September 28 (1) @ Giants 1–3 Sal Maglie (18–4) Ken Heintzelman (3–9) None see 2nd game 90–61–3
155 September 28 (2) @ Giants 1–3 Sheldon Jones (13–16) Robin Roberts (19–11) None 7,984 90–62–3
156 September 30 @ Dodgers 3–7 Erv Palica (13–8) Bob Miller (11–6) None 23,879 90–63–3
October (1–0)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
157 October 1 @ Dodgers 4–1 (10) Robin Roberts (20–11) Don Newcombe (19–11) None 35,073 91–63–3
^[a] The April 21, 1950, game ended after seven innings with the score tied 2–2,[29][30] and an additional game was played on June 29.
^[b] The April 26, 1950, game was protested by the Phillies in the bottom of the tenth inning.[31][32][33] The protest was later denied.[34]
^[c] The second game on May 14 was suspended (Sunday curfew[35][36]) after eight innings with the score 9–7 and was completed July 5, 1950, with new umpires.[37][38]
^[d] The second game on July 2, 1950, ended after ten innings (Sunday curfew) with the score tied 8–8,[39][40] and an additional game was played on September 6.
^[e] The August 12, 1950, game was protested by the Giants in the bottom of the fourth inning.[41][42] The protest was later denied.[43]
^[f] The second game on August 27, 1950, ended after eleven innings with the score tied 4–4,[44] and an additional game was played on August 28.[44][45]

Roster

1950 Philadelphia Phillies
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Andy Seminick 130 393 113 .288 24 68
1B Eddie Waitkus 154 641 182 .284 2 44
2B Mike Goliat 145 483 113 .234 13 64
3B Willie Jones 157 610 163 .267 25 88
SS Granny Hamner 157 637 172 .270 11 82
OF Dick Sisler 141 523 155 .296 13 83
OF Del Ennis 153 595 185 .311 31 128
OF Richie Ashburn 151 594 180 .303 2 41

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Stan Lopata 58 129 27 .209 1 11
Dick Whitman 75 132 33 .250 0 12
Jimmy Bloodworth 54 96 22 .229 0 13
Bill Nicholson 41 58 13 .224 3 10
Jackie Mayo 18 36 8 .222 0 3
Putsy Caballero 46 24 4 .167 0 0
Ken Silvestri 11 20 5 .250 0 4
Stan Hollmig 11 12 3 .250 0 1
Johnny Blatnik 4 4 1 .250 0 0

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Robin Roberts 40 304.1 20 11 3.02 146
Curt Simmons 31 214.2 17 8 3.40 146
Russ Meyer 32 159.2 9 11 5.30 74
Ken Heintzelman 23 125.1 3 9 4.09 39

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Bob Miller 35 172.0 11 6 3.57 44
Bubba Church 31 142.0 8 6 2.73 50
Ken Johnson 14 60.2 4 1 4.01 32

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Jim Konstanty 74 16 7 22 2.66 56
Milo Candini 18 1 0 0 2.70 10
Blix Donnelly 14 2 4 0 4.29 10
Hank Borowy 3 0 0 0 5.68 3
Paul Stuffel 3 0 0 0 1.80 3
Jack Brittin 3 0 0 0 4.50 3
Jocko Thompson 2 0 0 0 0.00 2
Steve Ridzik 1 0 0 0 6.00 2

1950 World Series

Main article: 1950 World Series

AL New York Yankees (4) vs. NL Philadelphia Phillies (0)

Game Score Date Location Attendance
1 Yankees – 1, Phillies – 0 October 4 Shibe Park 30,746
2 Yankees – 2, Phillies – 1 (10 innings) October 5 Shibe Park 32,660
3 Phillies – 2, Yankees – 3 October 6 Yankee Stadium 64,505
4 Phillies – 2, Yankees – 5 October 7 Yankee Stadium 68,098

Awards and honors

Records

Farm system

See also: Minor League Baseball

Level Team League Manager
AAA Toronto Maple Leafs International League Jack Sanford
A Utica Blue Sox Eastern League Leon Riley
B Terre Haute Phillies Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League Dan Carnevale
B Wilmington Blue Rocks Interstate League Skeeter Newsome
C Schenectady Blue Jays Canadian–American League Dick Carter
C Vandergrift Pioneers Middle Atlantic League Don Hasenmayer
C Salina Blue Jays Western Association John Davenport
D Klamath Falls Gems Far West League Hub Kittle
D Americus Phillies Georgia–Florida League Eddie Murphy
D Carbondale Pioneers North Atlantic League Joe Glenn
D Lima Phillies Ohio–Indiana League Frank McCormick
D Bradford Phillies PONY League Barney Lutz

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Terre Haute, Wilmington

Vandergrift club folded, July 20, 1950[49]

References

  1. ^ "Schoolboy Rowe page at Baseball Reference". Archived from the original on March 31, 2019. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  2. ^ "Milo Candini page at Baseball Reference". Archived from the original on July 8, 2019. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  3. ^ "Bob Bowman page at Baseball Reference". Archived from the original on March 26, 2019. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  4. ^ "Blue Jay Nickname Junked by Phillies". Spokane Daily Chronicle. January 10, 1950. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved July 30, 2015.
  5. ^ Roberts, Robin; C. Paul Rogers, Pat Williams (1996). The Whiz Kids and the 1950 Pennant. Temple University Press. p. 214. ISBN 9781566394666. Archived from the original on January 3, 2014. Retrieved May 22, 2009.
  6. ^ "1950 Philadelphia Phillies Schedule, Box Scores and Splits". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on September 22, 2010. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  7. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. April 21, 1950. p. 36. Retrieved April 17, 2017.
  8. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. April 25, 1950. p. 33. Retrieved April 19, 2017.
  9. ^ Les, Biederman (May 10, 1950). "Kiner's Bat Booming; Bucs-Phils Idled by Rain: Ralph Leading NL in Homers, RBIs; His 2 Clouts Stop Dodgers". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 33. Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  10. ^ "Phils Drop Out Of First Place As Bucs Win 2-1". Montreal, QC: The Gazette. Associated Press (AP). July 25, 1950. p. 14. Retrieved April 24, 2017. The game had been postponed from May 11 [sic] because of rain.
  11. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. May 19, 1950. p. 24. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  12. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. May 19, 1950. p. 39. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  13. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. May 20, 1950. p. 6. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  14. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. June 2, 1950. p. 40. Retrieved April 22, 2017.
  15. ^ "Baseball". Montreal, QC: The Gazette. June 10, 1950. p. 10. Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  16. ^ "Bucs, Phils Rained Out". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. June 10, 1950. p. 6. Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  17. ^ "Baseball". Montreal, QC: The Gazette. June 16, 1950. p. 18. Retrieved April 30, 2017.
  18. ^ "Baseball". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. June 17, 1950. p. 3 (Section 2). Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  19. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. July 18, 1950. p. 24. Retrieved April 23, 2017.
  20. ^ Jack, Hernon (July 25, 1950). "Rain Rescues Bucs; Beat Phillies, 2-1: Storm Ends Tight Game In Seventh: Phils Hold 3-2 Lead But Score Reverts To Previous Inning". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 14. Retrieved April 24, 2017. [T]he Phils took over a 3-2 lead in the top of the seventh inning, ... There were two strikes on Richie Ashburn when it began raining ... and the umpires called time. After a delay of one hour and four minutes, the game was called and the score reverted back to the sixth inning, giving the Pirates a 2-1 victory. ... Nothing in the seventh counted for the Phils, as the rules state that a complete inning must be played, unless the home team is leading, when the game is called.
  21. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. August 4, 1950. p. 16. Retrieved May 6, 2017.
  22. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. August 20, 1950. p. 41. Retrieved April 20, 2017.
  23. ^ a b "Baseball". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. August 21, 1950. p. 3 (Section 2). Retrieved April 20, 2017.
  24. ^ a b "Doubleheaders Pile Up on Dodgers and Braves". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). August 21, 1950. p. 20. Retrieved April 20, 2017.
  25. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. September 4, 1950. p. 6. Retrieved April 19, 2017.
  26. ^ "Red Sox Now Favored to Win Pennant in A. L.: Tigers Still Lead With Yanks Only Half-Game Behind". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). September 11, 1950. p. 27. Retrieved May 2, 2017. Rookie Jack Mayo homered for the Phils in the sixth inning and Granny Hamner singled to put the tying run on base, but the frame was washed out with the rain.
  27. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. September 14, 1950. p. 22. Retrieved May 7, 2017.
  28. ^ "Philadelphia Whiz Kids Trim Reds in 19 Innings, 8-7: Longest of Season In Major Leagues: Bubba Church, Struck by Line Drive, May Be Lost for Rest of Year". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. Associated Press (AP). September 16, 1950. p. 2 (Section 2). Retrieved May 6, 2017. The second game was one of the most dramatic contests ever played at Shibe Park. It came to a finish with less than a minute before the 12:59 a.m. curfew
  29. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. April 22, 1950. p. 12. Retrieved April 19, 2017.
  30. ^ "Phils, Braves Tie in Rain". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). April 22, 1950. p. 12. Retrieved April 19, 2017.
  31. ^ "Brooklyn Dodgers 5, Philadelphia Phillies 4". retrosheet.org. April 26, 1950. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved April 21, 2017. [Roy] Campanella doubled [Snider to third]; fan interference; the Phillies protested the game because the fan reached out and they thought Roy Campanella should have been ruled out[.]
  32. ^ "Dodgers Triumph in 10-inning Contest With Phillies, 5-4: Tigers Maintain Lead in A.L. Edging Browns as Yankees Win". Montreal, QC: The Gazette. Associated Press (AP). April 27, 1950. p. 18. Retrieved April 21, 2017. With one out and Duke Snider on first, Roy Campanella sent a long fly ball to left field which Dick Sisler apparently caught. Umpire Babe Pinelli, however, ruled that a fan had interfered with the ball and awarded Campanella a ground rule double. The Phils protested the decision.
  33. ^ "Rolfe's Flying Tigers Solid Dark-Horse Bet To Win AL Pennant: Detroit Wins Sixth Game in Seven Starts; Bums, Phils in Rhubarb; Cincy Still Winless". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). April 27, 1950. p. 48. Retrieved April 21, 2017. The Brooklyn Dodgers got involved in another rhubarb, which is hardly news, as they beat the Phillies, 5-4, in a 10-inning night game in Brooklyn. In fact the Phils finished the game under protest after Umpire Babe Pinelli ruled Roy Campanella's 10th inning fly, apparently caught by Dick Sisler, a ground rule double for fan interference. That put men on second and third and Pee Wee Reese's single won the game.
  34. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies at Brooklyn Dodgers Box Score, April 26, 1950". baseball-reference.com. sports-reference.com. April 26, 1950. Archived from the original on August 28, 2016. Retrieved April 21, 2017.
  35. ^ "Giants Stop Phillies, 4-3; Second Called". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). May 15, 1950. p. 22. Retrieved April 25, 2017. The second game was halted at the close of the eighth inning under Pennsylvania's Sunday curfew law which forbids the start of an inning on Sunday after 6:45 p. m., Eastern daylight time. The umpires promptly announced that the game will be completed the next time the Giants visit Philadelphia. This was the first time such a ruling was issued. Previously games called under curfew laws were recorded as complete games.
  36. ^ "Sunday Law Costly to Phils". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). May 15, 1950. p. 22. Retrieved April 25, 2017. It cost the Phillies part of their precious lead in the National League to observe the Sunday law to the letter yesterday. ... Under last year's rules, it would have been a victory for the Phils. The 1950 rules made the nightcap of a suspended game to be played off from the point of interruption the next time the teams meet. Thousands left Shibe Park believing the Phils had won. The public address announcer even named the winning and losing pitchers, but he corrected himself later.
  37. ^ "New York Giants at Philadelphia Phillies Box Score, May 14, 1950". baseball-reference.com. sports-reference.com. May 14, 1950. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved April 25, 2017.
  38. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies 9, New York Giants 7 (2)". retrosheet.org. May 14, 1950. Archived from the original on April 20, 2017. Retrieved April 25, 2017. [G]ame suspended for curfew; completed 7/5 with new umpires[.]
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  40. ^ "Phils Beat Dodgers, 6-4; Tie, 8-8: Curfew Stops Nightcap In Tenth After Reese Homers for Deadlock: Nicholson's Circuit Drive in First Tilt Provides Margin to Keep Quakers on Top; Simmons Collapses After 6 Hitless Innings". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). July 3, 1950. p. 12. Retrieved April 17, 2017.
  41. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies 5, New York Giants 4". retrosheet.org. August 12, 1950. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2017. [I]n the previous game, Eddie Stanky had stood behind 2B and waved his arms each time Andy Seminick batted; the Phillies had protested this action as unsportsmanlike; crew chief Al Barlick tried to contact NL president Ford Frick before this game to ask for a ruling; Barlick talked with Giants manager Leo Durocher about this; Durocher agreed to have Stanky stop until Frick could rule on it, since there was nothing in the rule book about it; [in the bottom of the 2nd inning] Stanky waved his arms but froze in place [as] Sheldon Jones started his pitching motion. ... Andy Seminick struck Hank Thompson on the jaw with his elbow on an attempted tag at 3B; Thompson was knocked out[.] ... [In the bottom of the 4th inning,] Eddie Stanky ejected by 2B umpire Lon Warneke for waving his arms to distract Andy Seminick; Durocher had called off the prohibition after Seminick hurt Hank Thompson; Seminick threw his bat onto the diamond after the second pitch and Stanky was tossed for 'conduct detrimental to baseball'; Durocher protested the game[.] ... Andy Seminick slid hard into Bill Rigney; the two started a fight, both benches cleared and a melle erupted; Seminick and Rigney ejected by 2B umpire Lon Warneke[.]
  42. ^ "Frick Calls Durocher on Carpet: National League Upset By 'Stanky Monoeuvre'". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. Associated Press (AP). August 14, 1950. p. 3 (Section 2). Retrieved May 13, 2017. The umpires asked Durocher to make Stanky cease and desist until they could get an official ruling from Frick. This Durocher did until Seminick slid into Giant Third-baseman Hank Thompson, knocking the latter out. Durocher promptly called off the truce and Stanky was just as promptly thrown out. The Giants lost the game, 5-4, and Durocher protested the contest.
  43. ^ "New York Giants at Philadelphia Phillies Box Score, August 12, 1950". baseball-reference.com. sports-reference.com. August 12, 1950. Archived from the original on March 13, 2016. Retrieved May 13, 2017.
  44. ^ a b "Phillies Five Up on Brooks Detroit's Lead Cut to Game". Montreal, QC: The Gazette. Associated Press (AP). August 28, 1950. p. 18. Retrieved April 23, 2017.
  45. ^ "Church Holds Up Phil's Staff in West: Rookie Beats Cubs For Second Victory In Last Four Days". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). August 28, 1950. p. 18. Retrieved April 23, 2017. The Cubs and Phils tied, 4-4, in their nightcap, called after 11 innings because of darkness. They will play it off in a double header today. The deadlock could not have occurred because of darkness anywhere else in the major leagues, since the Cub park in the only one without lights. Under new rules now in effect, all games are to be played to their conclusion except where curfew ordinances halt them.
  46. ^ "Eddie Sawyer Honored in Baseball Vote". Prescott Evening Courier. November 8, 1950. p. Section 2, Page 1. Archived from the original on February 22, 2017. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  47. ^ "Waitkus, Who Beat Death Rap, 'Comeback King'". Ellensburg Daily Record. November 10, 1950. p. 3. Archived from the original on July 30, 2016. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  48. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p. 290, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  49. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

Further reading