1967 Alberta general election

← 1963 May 23, 1967 (1967-05-23) 1971 →

65 seats in Legislative Assembly of Alberta
33 seats were needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party Third party
 
PC
LIB
Leader Ernest Manning Peter Lougheed Michael Maccagno
Party Social Credit Progressive Conservative Liberal
Leader since May 31, 1943 1965 January 28, 1967
Leader's seat Strathcona East Calgary-West Lac La Biche
Last election 60 seats, 54.8% 0 seats, 12.7% 2 seats, 19.8%
Seats before 57 0 3
Seats won 55 6 3
Seat change Decrease2 Increase6 ±0
Popular vote 222,270 129,544 53,847
Percentage 44.6% 26.0% 10.8%
Swing Decrease10.2% Increase13.3% Decrease9.0%

Premier before election

Ernest Manning
Social Credit

Premier after election

Ernest Manning
Social Credit

The 1967 Alberta general election was held on May 23, 1967, to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta to the 16th Alberta Legislature. The election was called after the 15th Alberta Legislature was prorogued on April 11, 1967, and dissolved on April 14, 1967.[1]

Ernest C. Manning led the Social Credit Party to its ninth consecutive majority government, winning 55 of the 65 seats in the legislature, despite getting less than 45 per cent of the popular vote. Although it was not apparent at the time, this proved to be an ominous sign for the party. The 1967 election was the first time the Social Credit government had won less than half the popular vote since 1955.

The once-moribund Progressive Conservatives, led by young lawyer Peter Lougheed, emerged as the main opposition to Social Credit. They won over a quarter of the popular vote and six seats, mostly in Calgary and Edmonton. Social Credit was slow to adapt to the changes in Alberta as its two largest cities gained increasing influence.

Despite losing close to half of the share of the popular vote they had won in the 1963 election, the Liberals managed to increase their number of seats from two to three as a result of the decline in the Social Credit vote.

Voters also decided upon the adoption of daylight saving time, in a province-wide plebiscite. It was defeated by a very slim margin with 51.25 per cent voting against.

Amendments to the Election Act in 1965 provided voting rights for Treaty Indians in provincial elections, making the 1967 election the first opportunity for Indigenous Albertans to vote in a provincial election.[2][3]

Background

Social Credit campaign

The Social Credit government had prepared well for the election in advance, with the party maintaining a significant war chest.[4] The Social Credit government came under criticism for low non-renewable resource royalty rates compared to other developed nations, which it counted by saying the royalties were the highest in Canada.[4] Social Credit focused on their governance record rather than make significant policy commitments, although the Social Credit government did commit to study rising car insurance rates.[4] Furthermore the Social Credit government argued they spent the most per capita on social issues despite having the lowest tax rate.[4]

An internal controversy occurred when Albert Bourcier, a Social Credit MLA from 1935–1952 filed papers to contest the Edmonton-Jasper Place constituency against incumbent Social Credit MLA John Horan. Bourcier was still an active member of the Social Credit Party, but was ejected from the party prior to the election. It was the second time Bourcier was ejected from the party, the first being in 1949 as a sitting MLA.[5] Horan was re-elected with 36.3 per cent of the vote, while Bourcier received 1.5 per cent of the vote.[6]

New Democratic Party campaign

The New Democratic Party (NDP) built a campaign on the foundation of higher oil royalties, greater participation by small businesses in oil and gas resources, transition electricity utilities to provincial ownership, provide for provincial car insurance, and development of rural natural gas infrastructure.[4]

Progressive Conservative campaign

New leader Peter Lougheed and his supporters worked tirelessly to convince candidates to run in all 65 constituencies, however the Progressive Conservatives were only able to nominate 47 candidates,[7] two more than the Liberal Party, but less than a full slate put forward by the Social Credit Party and the New Democratic Party. Lougheed sought candidates who were already public figures, often meeting with editors of local weekly newspapers, mayors and presidents of boards of trade to inquire who the community's leaders were.[8] As the writ came closer Lougheed and the Progressive Conservative realized they could not form government and instead focused on a strategy of capturing Lougheed's seat in Calgary-West and forming opposition.[7][9] The campaign created red, white and blue promotional materials with the slogan "Alberta Needs an Alternative", while Lougheed's own material added his personal slogan "Let's Start It in Calgary West".[9]

Lougheed sought a public debate amongst the four party leaders, however as a long time incumbent Manning was not willing to risk a debate which could not benefit him.[10] Manning's position on the debate changed when a group of Edmonton church leaders decided to host a leaders debate, Manning a devout Christian and host of "Back to the Bible Hour" radio broadcasts accepted the debate.[10][11] Lougheed's performance in the debate was lauded by the Edmonton Journal and was credited by biographer George Wood with the growth in the Conservative movement in the Edmonton area, including Don Getty's improbable victory over Social Credit Education Minister Randolph McKinnon in Strathcona West.[12] Other media began to take notice with Maclean's stating the only politician capable of having "an outside chance of challenging Manning" was Lougheed.[13]

During the campaign, the Progressive Conservatives called for the sale of Alberta Government Telephones.[4]

Lougheed was subsequently elected to the legislature in Calgary-West capturing 62 per cent of the vote, and the Progressive Conservatives captured 26 per cent of the vote province-wide with five other successful candidates,[14] and subsequently Lougheed became Leader of the Opposition. The group of elected Conservatives known as the "original six" included Calgary MLAs Len Werry, David Russell; Edmonton area MLAs Lou Hyndman and Don Getty, and the party's only rural candidate and former federal Member of Parliament Hugh Horner.[15] The Edmonton Journal positively remarked on Lougheed's success following the 1967 election, stating Albertans had a responsible and credible alternative as opposition.[15]

Eligibility to vote

The 1967 Alberta general election had four sets of criteria for a person to be eligible to vote. A eligible voter must be a Canadian citizen or British subject prior to April 14, 1967; 19 years of age or older on voting day; a resident of Alberta for 12 months preceding April 14, 1967; and a resident of the constituency on April 14, 1967.[16] Indigenous Albertans were eligible to vote for the first time in a provincial general election.

Results

Party Party leader # of
candidates
Seats Popular vote
1963 Dissolution Elected % Change # % % Change
  Social Credit Ernest C. Manning 65 60 57 55 -8.3% 222,270 44.60% -10.21%
Progressive Conservative Peter Lougheed 47 - - 6   129,544 26.00% +13.29%
Liberal Michael Maccagno 45 2 3 3 +50.0% 53,847 10.81% -8.95%
  Independent 7 - - 1   6,916 1.38% +0.40%
  NDP Neil Reimer 65 - 1 - - 79,610 15.98% +6.53%
Coalition Frank Gainer 2 1 1 - -100% 3,654 0.73% +0.19%
  Independent Progressive Conservative 2 * - - * 1,118 0.22% *
Liberal/Progressive Conservative Ross Ellis 1 - - - - 699 0.14% -0.14%
Independent Social Credit 2 - 1 - - 693 0.14% -0.65%
Total 236 63 63 65 +3.2% 498,351 100%
Source: Elections Alberta

Note:

* Party did not nominate candidates in the previous election

Popular vote
Social Credit
44.60%
PC
26.00%
New Democratic
15.98%
Liberal
10.81%
Others
2.61%
Seats summary
Social Credit
84.62%
PC
9.23%
Liberal
4.62%
Independent
1.54%

Daylight saving time plebiscite

Daylight saving time plebiscite
May 23, 1967 (1967-05-23)

Do you favour province-wide daylight saving time?
LocationAlberta
Results
Response Votes %
Yes 236,555 48.75%
No 248,680 51.25%
Total votes 485,235 100.00%

The Province of Alberta voted on its fifth provincial plebiscite. Voters were asked to endorse a proposal to adopt daylight saving time (summer time). The proposal was rejected by a very slim margin. The question was asked again in the next election, and passed at that time.

Background

In 1948, the Government of Alberta formally set the province's time zone with the passage of The Daylight Saving Time Act,[17] which mandated the entire province observe Mountain Standard Time, and prevented any municipality from observing daylight savings time or any other time zone. The bill came after Calgary (1946 and 1947), and Edmonton (1946) held municipal plebiscites which approved the move to daylight savings time.

Alberta's urban municipalities were in favour of daylight savings time and pressured the provincial government to hold a plebiscite or provide the authority for municipalities to locally observe daylight savings time. A joint motion of Calgary City Council and Edmonton City Council for a plebiscite was put to the Legislature in July 1963, with the support of Social Credit Minister and Edmonton Alderman Ethel Sylvia Wilson,[18] without success. A further effort in March 1964 by Liberal MLA and Calgary Alderman Bill Dickie to allow for a municipal plebiscite on the issue also failed in the Legislature, with Social Credit MLA William Patterson describing daylight savings time as "that fandangled thing", and Minister Allen Russell Patrick stating municipal daylight savings time would be difficult for tourists to understand.[19]

After a motion introduced by Bill Dickie was approved by the Legislature in February 1966 to hold a plebiscite on daylight savings time,[20] the government responded on March 29, 1966, Minister Alfred Hooke introduced An Act to amend The Daylight Savings Time Act (Bill 75) which amended the Daylight Savings Time Act[21] to permit the government to hold a plebiscite on the issue. On April 17, 1967 the Government of Alberta approved Order-in-Council 607/67 which provided the instructions for the plebiscite on daylight savings time. The prescribed question was "Do you favour Province-wide Daylight Savings Time?" with the two available responses as "Yes" and "No".[22]

Across Canada, by 1967, each province besides Alberta and Saskatchewan had adopted daylight savings time. Many Alberta businesses provided for modified summer hours, including the Alberta Stock Exchange which started at 7 a.m. to align with exchanges in Toronto and Montreal. Air Canada released a statement expressing the difficulty of distributing flight schedules with flights in Alberta.[23]

Arguments for and against

Arguments for daylight savings time were put forward by the construction industry including the Alberta Construction Association and Edmonton Home Builders Association.[24][25] The Calgary Herald editorial board published a number of editorials in advance of the plebiscite advocating for the province to observe daylight savings time, and further advocated for all of Canada to move to daylight savings time.[26][27] Calgary residents and businessmen Bill Creighton and David Matthews led a campaign for daylight savings times, arguing the benefits of an additional hour of late sunlight for sports.[28] Creighton was able to garner endorsements from the Alberta Amateur Athletics Union and other local golf, baseball, football and tennis associations.[29][30] The Calgary Tourist and Convention Association endorsed daylight savings, noting that tourists perceived the province as "backwards" for not adopting the time shift.[31] Liberal leader Michael Maccagno personally supported observing daylight savings time.[32]

Arguments against daylight savings time were made by the group Alberta Council for Standard Time founded by Calgary lawyer and drive-in movie operator R.H. Barron.[33] The Council ran a number of advertisements in local papers advocating for standard time, those arguments included the danger for children walking to school in the dark or twilight, and possible reductions to academic performance.[34]

Aftermath

The plebiscite resulted in a narrow victory for retaining Mountain Standard Time, with 51.25 per cent of the population voting against daylight savings time.[28] Alberta's large urban communities of Calgary, Edmonton, Lethbridge and Medicine Hat voted in favour, while the rural parts of the province voted against the proposal.[28]

The new Progressive Conservative caucus continued to pressure the Social Credit government to provide individual municipalities the power to institute Daylight Savings Time. A February 1968 motion by Edmonton MLA Don Getty and Bill Dickie for municipal authority to institute daylight savings time was rejected by the Legislature.[35]

In the aftermath of the plebiscite, the Calgary Herald blamed the defeat on "rural cousins" and the well organized Council for Standard Time, noting Calgarians voted two-to-one in favour of adopting daylight savings.[36] The editorial board for the Calgary Herald decried the failure of the plebiscite, but predicted that the province would eventually adopt daylight savings time.[37]

Results

Do you favour province-wide daylight saving time?[22]
For Against
236,555     48.75% 248,680     51.25%

For break down of results see individual districts

Results by riding

Electoral district Candidates Incumbent
Social Credit PC Liberal NDP Other
Alexandra Anders O. Aalborg
2,880
57.85%
Kenneth E. Oates
940
18.88%
Charles F. Swan
304
6.11%
Lester A. Lindgren
835
16.77%
Anders O. Aalborg
Athabasca Antonio Aloisio
1,733
45.08%
Dave Hunter
939
24.43%
George Opryshko
1,170
30.44%
Antonio Aloisio
Banff-Cochrane Roy Wilson
2,066
42.17%
Jack Fraser
374
7.63%
Clarence Copithorne (Ind.)
2,428
49.56%
Francis Leo Gainer
Bonnyville Romeo B. Lamothe
2,339
54.12%
Kenneth Joseph Kerr
316
7.31%
Romeo B. Lamothe
Bow Valley-Empress Fred T. Mandeville
2,525
49.16%
Calvin Steinley
549
10.69%
Ben M. MacLeod (Coal.)
2,018
39.63%
William Delday
Calgary Bowness Charles E. Johnston
6,461
37.63%
Len F. Werry
6,828
39.77%
John Donachie
1,876
10.93%
Evelyn Moore
1,905
11.09%
Charles E. Johnston
Calgary Centre Frederick C. Colborne
3,873
40.47%
Charles Henry Cook
3,359
35.10%
John Starchuk
1,275
13.32%
Mrs. Margaret Hanley
973
10.17%
Frederick C. Colborne
Calgary-East Albert W. Ludwig
5,563
50.43%
Jim Crawford
2,613
23.69%
Sandy Skoryko
803
7.28%
Kurt Gebauer
1,955
17.72%
Albert W. Ludwig
Calgary-Glenmore Len Pearson
3,840
27.43%
Ronald M. Helmer
3,406
24.33%
William Daniel Dickie
5,743
41.02%
Max Wolfe
950
6.79%
William Daniel Dickie
Calgary-North Robert A. Simpson
4,308
42.74%
Henry M. Beaumont
3,915
38.84%
Charles W. Loughridge
638
6.33%
Walter H. Siewert
1,157
11.48%
Robert A. Simpson
Calgary Queens Park Lea Leavitt
4,943
42.13%
Eric Charles Musgreave
3,820
32.56%
Darryl Raymaker
1,702
14.51%
Lisa Baldwin
1,220
10.40%
Calgary-South Arthur J. Dixon
5,401
41.76%
Joe Clark
4,940
38.19%
Willis E. O'Leary
1,146
8.86%
Jack D. Peters
1,388
10.73%
Arthur J. Dixon
Calgary Victoria Park Art Davis
3,956
35.49%
David J. Russell
4,796
43.03%
Reginald J. Gibbs
1,088
9.76%
Ted Takacs
1,229
11.03%
Calgary-West Donald S. Fleming
4,028
28.95%
Peter Lougheed
8,548
61.43%
Natalie Chapman
402
2.89%
Allan M. Early
868
6.24%
Donald S. Fleming
Camrose Chester I. Sayers
3,083
44.25%
Emmett G. Mohler
1,736
24.91%
G. Rod Knaut
699
10.03%
Rudy P. Swanson
1,412
20.26%
Chester I. Sayers
Cardston Alvin F. Bullock
2,120
47.11%
Larry L. Lang
1,692
37.60%
Leslie N. Howard
104
2.31%
Robert D. Burt (Ind.)
573
12.73%
Edgar W. Hinman
Clover Bar Walt A. Buck
4,101
51.35%
Daniel F. Hollands
2,215
27.73%
Kazmer D. Curry
468
5.86%
Alfred O. Arnston
1,175
14.71%
Floyd M. Baker
Cypress Harry E. Strom
2,577
76.65%
William George McFall
769
22.87%
Harry E. Strom
Drumheller-Gleichen Gordon Edward Taylor
4,018
67.46%
Tom Hanson
1,579
26.51%
Garry B. Law
345
5.79%
Gordon Edward Taylor
Dunvegan Ernest L. Lee
1,280
41.52%
Phil Thompson
1,080
35.03%
John A. Hammond (Coal.)
547
18.82%
Ernest L. Lee
Edmonton North Ethel Sylvia Wilson
4,698
38.21%
Tony Thibaudeau
3,461
28.15%
L. John Corbiere
1,303
10.60%
Gordon S.B. Wright
2,763
22.47%
Edmonton-Centre Ambrose Holowach
3,146
39.12%
Harold W. Veale
2,558
31.81%
Joseph A. Tannous
747
9.29%
Henry Tomaschuk
1,313
16.33%
Pat G.A. O'Hara (Ind.)
194
2.41%
Ambrose Holowach
Edmonton-Jasper Place John William Horan
4,206
36.34%
Gerard Joseph Amerongen
3,000
25.92%
Barry Vogel
1,851
15.99%
Tom Hennessey
2,210
19.09%
Albert V. Bourcier (Ind. SoCred)
176
John William Horan
Edmonton-North East Lou W. Heard
5,052
35.02%
Alan T. Cooke
3,616
25.06%
Peter Achtem
1,418
9.83%
Ivor G. Dent
4,276
29.64%
Lou W. Heard
Edmonton-North West Edgar H. Gerhart
4,674
36.10%
Paul Norris
4,205
32.48%
Thomas Leia
1,173
9.06%
Dave Belland
2,664
20.58%
Oscar A. Green (Ind.)
188
1.45%
Edgar H. Gerhart
Edmonton-Norwood William Tomyn
3,450
43.01%
Ronald W. Downey
2,023
25.22%
Grant W. Notley
2,433
30.33%
William Tomyn
Edmonton-West William A. Johnson
4,016
32.46%
Lou Hyndman
4,753
38.42%
J. Bernard Feehan
2,316
18.72%
Thomas C. Pocklington
1,254
10.14%
Stanley Gordon Geldart
Edson Arthur O. Jorgensen
2,372
34.59%
William A. Switzer
2,803
40.87%
C. Neil Reimer
1,656
24.15%
William Switzer
Grande Prairie Ira McLaughlin
4,847
55.38%
George M. Repka
1,132
12.93%
Alan Bush
2,748
31.40%
Ira McLaughlin
Grouard Roy Ells
3,363
51.02%
Gunnar Walhstrom
985
14.94%
Stan Daniels
2,207
33.49%
Roy Ells
Hand Hills-Acadia Clinton Keith French
2,675
50.17%
Bill Cross
2,140
40.14%
Ralph G. Jorgenson
504
9.45%
Clinton Keith French
Lac La Biche Harry Lobay
1,613
34.22%
Michael Maccagno
2,212
46.93%
Fred Ustina
758
16.08%
Michael Maccagno
Lac Ste. Anne William Patterson
1,731
30.14%
Hugh F. Horner
2,573
44.80%
Raymond Mills
723
12.59%
Swen Symington
674
11.74%
William Patterson
Lacombe Allan Russell Patrick
2,690
49.11%
John William Cookson
1,999
36.49%
Glen R. Nelson
777
14.18%
Allan Russell Patrick
Leduc James D. Henderson
2,193
45.38%
Emanuel Prycz
1,206
24.96%
Russell Olekshy
383
7.93%
Alex A. Sklarenko
1,021
21.13%
James D. Henderson
Lethbridge John C. Landeryou
6,155
44.27%
Wilfred Bowns
4,128
29.69%
John I. Boras
2,237
16.09%
Klaas Buijert
1,335
9.60%
John C. Landeryou
Little Bow Raymond Albert Speaker
3,367
68.25%
John K. Head
572
11.60%
Arthur W. Ulrich (Ind.)
978
19.83%
Raymond Albert Speaker
Macleod Leighton E. Buckwell
2,822
51.68%
George Whitehead
1,773
32.47%
Melba J. Cochlan
149
2.73%
Sid J. Cornish
673
12.32%
James Hartley
Medicine Hat Harry C. Leinweber
4,390
39.96%
James Horsman
2,701
24.59%
Roy Weidermann
2,025
18.43%
Ted. J. Grimm
1,819
16.56%
Harry C. Leinweber
Okotoks-High River Edward P. Benoit
2,289
48.50%
Thomas E. Hughes
2,097
44.43%
Ron A. Baker
88
1.86%
Georgina M. Smith
212
4.49%
Edward P. Benoit
Olds-Didsbury Robert Curtis Clark
4,052
65.02%
Stan Bell
1,129
18.12%
Eva Banta
485
7.78%
Chas. Purvis (Ind. Con.)
547
8.80%
Robert Curtis Clark
Peace River Robert H. Wiebe
2,860
53.49%
Harry Reinders
1,338
25.02%
Edward R. Whitney (Ind.)
1,149
21.49%
Euell F. Montgomery
Pembina Adam Carl Muller
2,866
47.23%
Edward G. Samuel
2,098
34.57%
Edward P. MacCallum
484
7.98%
George A.E. Garnett
576
9.49%
Robin D. Jorgenson
Pincher Creek-Crowsnest Charles Duncan Drain
2,345
45.78%
Alexander B. Wells
722
14.10%
F. Benton Murphy
255
4.98%
Garth A. Turcott
1,772
34.60%
Garth Turcott
Ponoka Neville S. Roper
3,286
62.04%
Derek R. Broughton
514
9.70%
Ed Nelson
1,464
27.64%
Glen F. Johnston
Red Deer William Kenneth Ure
6,166
46.42%
James L. Foster
4,628
34.84%
Robert H. Scammell
636
4.79%
Ethel Taylor
1,799
13.54%
William Kenneth Ure
Redwater Michael Senych
1,588
43.42%
Basil Zailo
1,314
35.93%
Norman T. Flack
737
20.15%
Michael Senych
Rocky Mountain House Alfred J. Hooke
2,538
53.21%
Gilbert H.C. Farthing
792
16.60%
Will Sinclair (Ind.)
1,406
29.48%
Alfred J. Hooke
Sedgewick-Coronation Jack C. Hillman
3,470
59.41%
Ernie Moore
1,103
18.88%
Eugene F. Price
547
9.36%
Arthur C. Bunney
680
11.64%
Jack C. Hillman
Spirit River Adolph O. Fimrite
2,627
56.12%
John L. Listhaeghe
413
8.82%
Bert M. Strand
1,634
34.91%
Adolph O. Fimrite
St. Albert Keith Everitt
2,824
35.44%
Stanley M. Walker
1,469
18.43%
Robert A. Russell
2,297
28.82%
Norman Dolman
1,339
16.80%
Keith Everitt
St. Paul Raymond Reierson
2,275
44.29%
Armand Lamothe
1,489
28.99%
Pierre M. Vallee
788
15.34%
Leroy P. Christensen (Ind. P.C.)
571
11.12%
Raymond Reierson
Stettler Galen C. Norris
2,659
54.88%
Bob McKnight
1,461
30.15%
Morton H. Neilson
635
13.11%
Galen C. Norris
Stony Plain Ralph A. Jespersen
2,316
36.25%
Frank Flanagan
1,670
26.14%
Maurice R. McCullagh
1,855
29.03%
Cornelia R. Wood (Ind. SoCred)
517
8.13%
Cornelia R. Wood
Strathcona Centre Joseph Donovan Ross
4,052
40.50%
Larry Boddy
2,493
24.92%
Ian Nicoll
1,794
17.93%
Gordon E. Weese
1,627
16.26%
Joseph Donovan Ross
Strathcona East Ernest C. Manning
6,314
49.70%
C. Jack Thorpe
2,976
23.43%
Percy Marshall
1,458
11.48%
Ray Field
1,909
15.03%
Ernest C. Manning
Strathcona South Joe G. Radstaak
3,934
40.73%
Oscar H. Kruger
2,594
26.86%
John Kloster
968
10.02%
Bill McLean
2,123
21.98%
Strathcona West Randolph H. McKinnon
5,153
36.87%
Donald Ross Getty
6,764
48.39%
Edmund H. Leger
890
6.37%
Frank Kuzemski
1,115
7.98%
Randolph H. McKinnon
Taber-Warner Douglas Miller
3,451
61.24%
Emil D. Gundlock
1,170
20.76%
Theodore Rudd
683
12.12%
Dick Verwoerd
292
5.18%
Leonard C. Halmrast
Three Hills Raymond Ratzlaff
2,762
50.48%
Gordon Leslie
1,113
20.34%
James A. Lore
1,317
24.07%
George E. Pieper
268
4.90%
Roy Davidson
Vegreville-Bruce Alex W. Gordey
2,497
44.41%
Mike W. Kawulych
1,742
30.98%
Wilfrid L. Horton
345
6.14%
Albin Lukawiecki
1,010
17.96%
Alex W. Gordey
Vermilion Ashley H. Cooper
2,545
57.80%
Hilda Wilson
1,199
27.23%
Harry E. Yaremchuk
642
14.58%
Ashley H. Cooper
Wainwright Henry A. Ruste
3,807
82.15%
Glenn Valleau
789
17.03%
Henry A. Ruste
Wetaskiwin Albert W. Strohschein
2,879
45.67%
Dallas Schmidt
2,408
38.20%
Robert P. Christensen
1,000
15.86%
Albert W. Strohschein
Willingdon-Two Hills Nicholas A. Melnyk
2,160
62.25%
Louis Souter
1,298
37.41%
Nicholas A. Melnyk

See also

References

  1. ^ Perry & Footz 2006, p. 498.
  2. ^ "Alberta Session Winds Up". Calgary Herald. Edmonton. April 13, 1965. p. 1. ProQuest 2253686786.
  3. ^ An Act to amend The Election Act, SA 1965, c 23, retrieved from CanLII on July 21, 2021
  4. ^ a b c d e f Baird 1968, p. 184.
  5. ^ "Socreds Again Kick Out Bourcier; Opposition To Horan The Reason". Edmonton Journal. May 15, 1967. p. 14. ProQuest 2397632581.
  6. ^ "Edmonton-Jasper Place Official Results 1967 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  7. ^ a b Perry & Craig 2006, p. 523.
  8. ^ Wood 1985, p. 47.
  9. ^ a b Wood 1985, p. 57.
  10. ^ a b Wood 1985, p. 59.
  11. ^ Tupper 2004, p. 208.
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Primary Sources