This grey silk Brunswick is trimmed with striped ribbons.  Lady Mary Fox by Pompeo Batoni, 1767.
This grey silk Brunswick is trimmed with striped ribbons. Lady Mary Fox by Pompeo Batoni, 1767.
Self-Portrait at the Age of 56, 1776, oil on canvas, in the collection of the Uffizi
Self-Portrait at the Age of 56, 1776, oil on canvas, in the collection of the Uffizi

A Brunswick gown or Brunswick is a two-piece woman's gown of the mid-eighteenth century.

Description

The Brunswick comprises a hip-length (or three-quarter length) jacket with a high neckline and a hood, worn with a matching petticoat.[1] The jacket sleeves consist of an upper sleeve with flounces at the elbow and a tight, wrist-length lower sleeve.

The Brunswick is one of several informal jacket-and-petticoat costumes popular in the later 18th century, derived from working class costume but made up in fine fabrics (usually silk).[2]

Originating in France (based on a German fashion), the Brunswick was also popular in England and the United States as a traveling costume.

Today, the term is generically used to describe a hip-length, close-fitting padded coat with a neckline (and not necessarily with a hood).

Paintings depicting Brunswicks

References

  1. ^ "A Colonial Lady's Clothing: A Glossary of Terms". ouramericanrevolution.org. Retrieved 2020-08-21.
  2. ^ "18th Century Gowns: Round-Gown, Brunswick, and Sack-Back Gown • Paper Thin Personas". Paper Thin Personas. 2015-08-14. Retrieved 2020-08-21.
  3. ^ "Rococo fashion of women in 1750-1775". HiSoUR - Hi So You Are. 2018-06-05. Retrieved 2020-08-21.
  4. ^ "Rate the Dress: an 18th century Hoodie". The Dreamstress. 2018-04-02. Retrieved 2020-08-21.

Bibliography