Concordia Parish, Louisiana
Parish of Concordia
Old Concordia Parish Courthouse in Vidalia
Old Concordia Parish Courthouse in Vidalia
Location within the U.S. state of Louisiana
Location within the U.S. state of Louisiana
Louisiana
Louisiana's location within the U.S.
Country United States
State Louisiana
RegionCentral
Founded1807
Named forPossibly a land grant, New Concordia
Parish seat (and largest city)Vidalia
Area
 • Total1,930 km2 (747 sq mi)
 • Land1,810 km2 (697 sq mi)
 • Water100 km2 (50 sq mi)
 • percentage17 km2 (6.7 sq mi)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total20,822
 • Estimate 
(2018)
19,572
 • Density11/km2 (28/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
Area code318
Congressional district5th
Websitewww.conppj.org

Concordia Parish (French: Paroisse de Concordia) borders the Mississippi River in eastern central Louisiana. As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,822.[1] The parish seat is Vidalia.[2] The parish was formed in 1807.[3]

Concordia Parish is part of the Natchez, MS–LA Micropolitan Statistical Area. It is historically considered part of the Natchez District, devoted to cotton cultivation as a commodity crop, in contrast to the sugar cane crop of southern Louisiana. Other Louisiana parishes of similar character are East and West Carroll, Madison and Tensas, all in this lowlying delta land. On the east side of the Mississippi River is the Natchez District around the city of Natchez, Mississippi.[4]

History

Prehistory

Main article: History of Louisiana § Prehistory

Concordia Parish was the home to many successive Native American cultures for thousands of years before European encounter. Peoples of the Marksville culture, Troyville culture, Coles Creek culture and Plaquemine culture built villages and earthwork mound sites throughout the area. Notable examples include Cypress Grove Mound, DePrato Mounds, Frogmore Mound Site, and Lamarque Landing Mound.

Historic Native American tribes encountered by early French explorers and colonists were the following:

Historic era

Concordia was named by Anglo-American settlers for a Latin word meaning "harmony". They came mostly after the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, when the United States took over this formerly French colonial area west of the Mississippi. Like other parishes of the lands along the Mississippi River, in the antebellum era, the parish was developed for cotton cultivation on large plantations. The labor-intensive crop was profitable because of the labor of enslaved African Americans.

In 1789, Jose Don Vidal a resident of Natchez, MS and later the founder of the city of Vidalia, LA asked for land grants to move his family from Natchez to the other side of the Mississippi River. In Natchez, there was a mansion built called Concord (Natchez, Mississippi), this was a residence lived in by Spanish governors, also Vidal and his family lived there before the time era of the US began.

The Mansion started the name "Concord" and ultimately later led to the birth of what would be Concordia Parish. During the year of 1804, a ceremony of transfer was held and the citizens and Mayor of Natchez crossed over to the Louisiana side of the Mississippi to honor the new land that was founded. The Mansion was later struct by fire in the early 20th century (1901) and burned down. Natchez people also lived on both sides of the land.

"Concordia County" was a creation of the first Legislative Council held in New Orleans on December 2, 1804. Its territory that included parts of the present parishes of East Carroll, Madison, and Tensas.[5] Land between the Mississippi, Red, Black, and Tensaw rivers comprised the early local administration of Concordia.[6]

Because Concordia's alluvial soil was unusually productive for cotton growing, it attracted large plantations, whose owners enslaved a very high number of people. In 1860, slaves made up 91 percent of Concordia Parish's residents, the highest percentage of any Louisiana parish. Only two counties in the United States — Washington and Issaquena counties in Mississippi — had a higher percentage of its population enslaved.[7] As might be expected, the small number of white cotton planters in Concordia were fierce defenders of chattel slavery and strongly backed the Confederacy during the American Civil War.

Law and government

The current elected sheriff is David Hedrick.

The parish trends Democratic for local offices. For national offices, the majority has favored Republican candidates. In the 2008 presidential election, the Democrat Barack Obama of Illinois received 3,766 votes (39.5 percent) in Concordia Parish to 5,668 (59.5 percent) for the Republican nominee, John McCain of Arizona.[8] In 2004, Concordia Parish cast 5,427 votes (60 percent) for President George W. Bush and 3,446 ballots (38 percent) for his Democratic rival, Senator John F. Kerry of Massachusetts.

Presidential election results
Presidential election results[9]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 62.9% 5,550 36.0% 3,177 1.1% 101
2016 61.7% 5,477 36.9% 3,272 1.4% 123
2012 58.1% 5,450 40.9% 3,833 1.0% 97
2008 59.5% 5,668 39.5% 3,766 1.0% 93
2004 60.4% 5,427 38.4% 3,446 1.2% 107
2000 54.4% 4,627 42.0% 3,569 3.6% 303
1996 36.0% 3,134 52.4% 4,565 11.7% 1,016
1992 35.2% 3,223 46.8% 4,283 18.0% 1,642
1988 57.5% 5,037 39.5% 3,461 3.0% 263
1984 63.7% 6,177 34.4% 3,332 1.9% 183
1980 54.2% 4,933 43.5% 3,956 2.3% 213
1976 48.7% 3,849 49.2% 3,892 2.2% 171
1972 64.4% 4,521 30.5% 2,142 5.1% 360
1968 13.0% 974 26.4% 1,983 60.6% 4,542
1964 83.3% 4,022 16.8% 809
1960 30.3% 1,009 23.1% 768 46.7% 1,554
1956 39.7% 841 33.0% 699 27.2% 576
1952 47.0% 1,110 53.0% 1,252
1948 6.3% 98 21.0% 329 72.8% 1,140
1944 17.1% 201 82.9% 974
1940 9.2% 119 90.8% 1,173
1936 4.8% 58 95.1% 1,152 0.1% 1
1932 2.0% 20 98.0% 999
1928 18.4% 133 81.6% 591
1924 12.6% 46 87.4% 319
1920 3.1% 12 96.9% 380
1916 3.6% 10 95.3% 264 1.1% 3
1912 2.7% 6 91.1% 205 6.2% 14

Geography

Frogmore Mound Site on U.S. Highway 84 near Ferriday
The Concordia Parish Library is located in Vidalia behind the parish courthouse.
The Concordia Parish Library is located in Vidalia behind the parish courthouse.
The Vidalia Senior Center is operated by the Concordia Council on Aging.
The Vidalia Senior Center is operated by the Concordia Council on Aging.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the parish has a total area of 747 square miles (1,930 km2), of which 697 square miles (1,810 km2) is land and 50 square miles (130 km2) (6.7%) is water.[10]

The parish is completely agricultural bottomlands. The Ouachita River runs along the west boundary, the Red River along the south, and the Mississippi River along the east. All three rivers are contained by large levee systems.

Major highways

Adjacent counties and parishes

National protected area

State protected area

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18202,626
18304,66277.5%
18409,414101.9%
18507,758−17.6%
186013,80577.9%
18709,977−27.7%
188014,91449.5%
189014,871−0.3%
190013,559−8.8%
191014,2785.3%
192012,466−12.7%
193012,7782.5%
194014,56214.0%
195014,398−1.1%
196020,46742.2%
197022,57810.3%
198022,9811.8%
199020,828−9.4%
200020,247−2.8%
201020,8222.8%
2018 (est.)19,572[11]−6.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]
1790-1960[13] 1900-1990[14]
1990-2000[15] 2010-2013[1]

2020 census

Concordia Parish racial composition[16]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 10,157 54.35%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 7,477 40.01%
Native American 39 0.21%
Asian 115 0.62%
Other/Mixed 440 2.35%
Hispanic or Latino 459 2.46%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 18,687 people, 7,162 households, and 4,562 families residing in the parish.

2000 census

As of the census[17] of 2000, there were 20,247 people, 7,521 households, and 5,430 families residing in the parish. The population density was 29 people per square mile (11/km2). There were 9,148 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the parish was 57.9% White, 40.7% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.55% from other races, and 0.8% from two or more races. 1.2% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 7,521 households, out of which 33.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.00% were married couples living together, 19.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.80% were non-families. 25.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the parish the population was spread out, with 27.80% under the age of 18, 8.90% from 18 to 24, 25.60% from 25 to 44, 23.00% from 45 to 64, and 14.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.90 males.

The median income for a household in the parish was $22,742, and the median income for a family was $28,629. Males had a median income of $27,453 versus $18,678 for females. The per capita income for the parish was $11,966. About 24.30% of families and 29.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 42.00% of those under age 18 and 20.60% of those age 65 or over.


Education

Concordia Parish School Board operates public schools in the parish.

National Guard

1086TH Transportation Company of the 165TH CSS (Combat Service Support) Battalion of the 139TH RSG (Regional Support Group) is based in Vidalia, Louisiana on the west bank of the Mississippi River.

Communities

City

Towns

Map of Concordia Parish, with municipal labels
Map of Concordia Parish, with municipal labels

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Notable people

Arts and entertainment

Journalism

Politics

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved August 20, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Concordia Parish". Center for Cultural and Eco-Tourism. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  4. ^ John C. Rodrigue, Reconstruction in the Cane Fields: From Slavery to Free Labor in Louisiana's Sugar Parishes, 1862--1880, LSU Press, 2001, p. 176
  5. ^ Calhoun, Robert Dabney. (1932). A history of Concordia Parish, Louisiana. (1768-1931). New Orleans, LA: n.p. pp. 33-34.
  6. ^ Brackenridge, Henry Marie. (1817). Views of Louisiana: containing geographical, statistical, and historical notices of that vast and important portion of America. Baltimore: Schaeffer & Maund. Google Books website pp. 287-288.
  7. ^ "Map showing the distribution of the slave population of the southern states of the United States. Compiled from the census of 1860". Library of Congress. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  8. ^ "Louisiana general election returns, November 4, 2008". sos.louisiana.gov. Retrieved June 15, 2010.[permanent dead link]
  9. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 7, 2018.
  10. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 28, 2013. Retrieved August 27, 2014.
  11. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 27, 2014.
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 27, 2014.
  14. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 27, 2014.
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 27, 2014.
  16. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  17. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  18. ^ Henry E. Chambers, History of Louisiana, Vol. 2 (Chicago and New York City: The American Historical Society, Inc., 1925, p. 71)
  19. ^ "Membership in the Louisiana State Senate, 1880-2012" (PDF). legis.state.la.us. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  20. ^ "Mike Hasten, "Louisiana insurance commissioner's race Wooley turns temporary job into a mission", November 7, 2003". capitolwatch.reallouisiana.com. Archived from the original on May 5, 2012. Retrieved June 18, 2013.

Coordinates: 31°26′N 91°38′W / 31.44°N 91.64°W / 31.44; -91.64