KBIM-TV
Satellite of KRQE,
AlbuquerqueSanta Fe, New Mexico
RoswellCarlsbad, New Mexico
United States
CityRoswell, New Mexico
ChannelsDigital: 10 (VHF)
Virtual: 10
Programming
Affiliations
Ownership
OwnerNexstar Media Group
(Nexstar Media Inc.)
KRWB-TV
History
First air date
February 24, 1966
(56 years ago)
 (1966-02-24)
Former channel number(s)
Analog:
10 (VHF, 1966–2009)
Digital:
41 (UHF, until 2009)
  • Secondary:
  • UPN/The WB (January–October 1995)
Technical information
Licensing authority
FCC
Facility ID48556
ERP24.32 kW
HAAT610 m (2,001 ft)
Transmitter coordinates33°3′20″N 103°49′14″W / 33.05556°N 103.82056°W / 33.05556; -103.82056 (KBIM-TV)
Translator(s)See below
Links
Public license information
Profile
LMS
Websitewww.krqe.com

KBIM-TV, virtual and VHF digital channel 10, is a dual CBS/Fox-affiliated television station licensed to Roswell, New Mexico, United States and also serving Carlsbad. It is a satellite of Albuquerque-licensed KRQE (channel 13), which is owned by Irving, Texas-based Nexstar Media Group. KBIM-TV's offices are located on Main Street in Roswell, and its transmitter is located in southeast Chaves County atop the Caprock Escarpment; its parent station maintains studios on Broadcast Plaza in Albuquerque.

KREZ-TV (channel 6) in Durango, Colorado also serves as a satellite of KRQE. These satellite operations provide additional news bureaus for KRQE and sell advertising time to local sponsors.

History

On June 24, 1963, Taylor Broadcasting Company, owner of KBIM (910 AM), filed an application with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for a construction permit to build a new commercial television station on channel 10 in Roswell.[1] Taylor's was the second attempt at building Roswell's channel 10 allocation; the New Mexico Telecasting Company had previously obtained a construction permit for KRNM-TV in 1961.[2] After a hearing, the Taylor permit was granted on November 4, 1964, and construction began the next year at a transmitter site on the Caprock, 29 miles (47 km) east of Hagerman.[3] The 1,839-foot (561 m) tower was the tallest in New Mexico and the world's fourth-tallest at completion.[4]

KBIM-TV began broadcasting as a CBS affiliate on February 24, 1966.[4] However, the station's fortunes took a hard crash little more than a month after signing on. On April 1 at 6:53 a.m., general manager and 50-percent owner[5] W. C. "Bill" Taylor received a call informing him that the station's new tower on the Caprock had collapsed. He believed it to be an April Fool's Day joke; however, it was not.[6] The top 1,350 feet (410 m) of the mast, which housed KBIM-TV and KBIM-FM, fell to the ground.[7] A new tall tower was in service by September.[8] The license was transferred to a related company, Holsum, Incorporated, in 1970.[1]

Tragedy struck the KBIM stations for a second time on the morning of May 31, 1977, when a fire gutted the shared studios on Main Street.[9] The television station was out of service for 10 days.[6] New studios were set up at 214 North Main Street, still used by the television station today.[10] Holsum sold off the radio properties to King Broadcasting in 1981; it then acquired KCBD-TV in Lubbock, Texas, in 1983. KCBD also owned KSWS-TV, Roswell's other commercial station, which was spun off to KOB in Albuquerque;[11] a challenge to the sale held up the acquisition until 1985.[12]

Purchase by KGGM-TV

In February 1989, the New Mexico Broadcasting Company—owner of KGGM-TV, Albuquerque's CBS affiliate—announced it had reached an agreement to purchase KBIM-TV from Holsum.[13] Holsum had opted to sell instead of a merger, which was contemplated, because of the depressed regional economy. The Hebenstreit family, majority owners of New Mexico Broadcasting Company, had previously expressed interest in Roswell; their proposal for a new channel 8 TV station was the reason for the delay in KOB purchasing KSWS-TV earlier in the decade.[11]

For KGGM-TV, buying the Roswell station also came with a perk that would benefit every other Albuquerque station. The two television ratings agencies, Arbitron and Nielsen, had reckoned Roswell as a separate media market. Not only would KGGM have access to Roswell's households for the first time, but the Roswell market would be folded into Albuquerque, resulting in the market nearing the national top 50.[14]

That fall, after the $5 million purchase closed, KBIM-TV began airing some of KGGM-TV's newscasts. At 6 and 10 p.m. weeknights, viewers continued to see full newscasts from Roswell; statewide newscasts from Albuquerque were offered at 5 p.m. and on weekends.[15] In 1991, a cost-cutting move saw six people laid off and the 10 p.m. newscasts discontinued, leaving local 5:30 a.m., noon and 6 p.m. newscasts;[16] Within three months, however, and after KOAT-TV began to increase its southeastern New Mexico presence, the station instead decided to sacrifice its noon newscast and air a local 10 p.m. program.[17]

The KBIM-TV acquisition ended up being significant to the Hebenstreits in one other way: it signaled the beginning of the end for one of the nation's last major-market family-owned TV stations. Citing the financial strain of the expansion, in July 1991, the Hebenstreits sold their 58 percent share in New Mexico Broadcasting Company to Lee Enterprises of Davenport, Iowa, which had owned the remainder for five years.[18] KGGM-TV became KRQE the next year.[19]

In 1998, Lee rebranded the combination of KRQE, KBIM-TV, and KREZ-TV in Durango, Colorado (which it had purchased) as "CBS Southwest" and revamped the Roswell and Durango stations' news services to produce inserts into KRQE's early evening newscasts.[20] Two years later, Lee exited broadcasting and sell KRQE, KBIM-TV, and most of its other television properties to Emmis Communications in 2000; in 2005, Emmis, in its own exit from television, sold its New Mexico outlets to LIN TV Corporation. Local newscasts from Roswell ended on December 12, 2008, as part of further budget cuts and to reinvest money into technology improvements. KRQE continued to maintain a news presence in Roswell, stationing a reporter there.[21]

Technical information

Subchannels

The station's digital signal is multiplexed:

Channel Video Aspect Short name Programming[22]
10.1 1080i 16:9 KBIM-HD Main KBIM-TV programming / CBS
10.2 720p FoxNM Fox

Analog-to-digital conversion

KBIM-TV shut down its analog signal, over VHF channel 10, on June 12, 2009, the official date in which full-power stations in the United States transitioned from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate. The station's digital signal relocated from its pre-transition UHF channel 41 to VHF channel 10.[23]

Translators

City of license Call sign Channel ERP HAAT Facility ID Transmitter coordinates Owner[24]
Alamogordo K32OE-D 32 0.42 kW 516 m (1,693 ft) 48563 32°49′47.3″N 105°53′13.9″W / 32.829806°N 105.887194°W / 32.829806; -105.887194 (K32OE-D) Nexstar Media Group
Clovis K24MW-D 24 1.53 kW 93 m (305 ft) 48551 34°26′23″N 103°12′46″W / 34.43972°N 103.21278°W / 34.43972; -103.21278 (K24MW-D)
Dora K20KT-D 20 10 kW 53 m (174 ft) 48557 33°54′15.3″N 103°30′42.8″W / 33.904250°N 103.511889°W / 33.904250; -103.511889 (K20KT-D)
Ruidoso K16BZ-D 16 1.25 kW 890 m (2,920 ft) 48554 33°24′14.2″N 105°46′56.9″W / 33.403944°N 105.782472°W / 33.403944; -105.782472 (K16BZ-D)

References

  1. ^ a b FCC History Cards for KBIM-TV
  2. ^ "Second TV Station Still Planned Here". Roswell Daily Record. May 4, 1961. pp. 1, 2. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  3. ^ "KBIM Building Nears Completion Some 29 Miles East of Hagerman". Roswell Daily Record. November 11, 1965. p. 31. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  4. ^ a b "KBIM-TV Ready to Go". Roswell Daily Record. February 24, 1966. p. 1. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  5. ^ "KBIM-TV" (PDF). Television Factbook. 1967. p. 457-b. Retrieved December 7, 2021 – via World Radio History.
  6. ^ a b "City has had a variety of broadcasters". The Roswell Daily Record. Roswell, New Mexico. July 1, 1979. p. Roswell in Review 12. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 6, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "KBIM Television Tower Is Toppled". Hobbs Daily News-Sun. Hobbs, New Mexico. April 1, 1966. p. 1. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 6, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "KBIM to Change To Tall Tower". Roswell Daily Record. September 8, 1966. p. 2. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  9. ^ Walker, Deborah (May 31, 1977). "Fire guts KBIM studios; officials probe remains". Roswell Daily Record. p. 1. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  10. ^ "KBIM returns to 'Main' air waves—once again". Roswell Daily Record. October 12, 1978. p. 8. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  11. ^ a b Lee, Robert R. (October 4, 1983). "Station files for TV permit". Roswell Daily Record. p. 1. Archived from the original on December 5, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  12. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. July 15, 1985. p. 61. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2021-11-08. Retrieved 2021-12-07.
  13. ^ Nathanson, Rick (February 24, 1989). "Roswell TV Station Purchased: KGGM Owners Cite Added Viewership". Albuquerque Journal. Albuquerque, New Mexico. p. C12. Retrieved December 7, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "City Nears Top-50 TV Market Ranking". Albuquerque Journal. Albuquerque, New Mexico. March 23, 1989. p. B10. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ Hebenstreit, Andrew B. (September 5, 1989). "Promises continued area news coverage". Carlsbad Current-Argus. Carlsbad, New Mexico. p. A-5. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ Nathanson, Rick (June 20, 1991). "Roswell's KBIM Lays Off Six To Trim Costs". Albuquerque Journal. Albuquerque, New Mexico. p. C8. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ Nathanson, Rick (August 30, 1991). "Television News War Heats Up in Roswell". Albuquerque Journal. Albuquerque, New Mexico. p. B11. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ Nathanson, Rick (July 24, 1991). "Family-Owned TV Stations Sold: Albuquerque's KGGM, Roswell's KBIM Go to Iowa Company". Albuquerque Journal. Albuquerque, New Mexico. p. A1, A2. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ Nathanson, Rick (July 31, 1992). "Hebenstreit Family's KGGM-TV Slipping Into History". Albuquerque Journal. Albuquerque, New Mexico. p. C3. Archived from the original on December 7, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "CBS Southwest". Albuquerque Journal. Albuquerque, New Mexico. August 9, 1998. p. 52. Retrieved December 7, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "KBIM-TV ending local newscasts". Roswell Daily Record. December 11, 2008. p. 1.
  22. ^ "RabbitEars TV Query for KBIM". Archived from the original on 2021-12-07. Retrieved 2021-12-05.
  23. ^ "DTV Tentative Channel Designations for the First and the Second Rounds" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-08-29. Retrieved 2012-03-24.
  24. ^ "List of TV Translator Input Channels". Federal Communications Commission. July 23, 2021. Retrieved December 7, 2021.