WXIN
From left: A red box containing a silvery Fox logo, next to a blue, squarish box containing a silver sans serif numeral "59".
Channels
BrandingFox59
Programming
Affiliations
Ownership
Owner
WTTV / WTTK
History
FoundedJuly 12, 1983 (1983-07-12)
First air date
February 1, 1984 (40 years ago) (1984-02-01)
Former call signs
  • WSMK (CP, 1982–1983)
  • WPDS-TV (1983–1985)
  • WXIN-TV (August 1985)
Former channel number(s)
  • Analog: 59 (UHF, 1984–2009)
  • Digital: 45 (UHF, 1999–2019)
Independent (1984–1986)
Call sign meaning
Intended as a memory aid to distinguish from other stations, with "IN" for Indiana[2]
Technical information[3]
Licensing authority
FCC
Facility ID146
ERP1,000 kW
HAAT304 m (997 ft)
Transmitter coordinates39°53′20″N 86°12′7″W / 39.88889°N 86.20194°W / 39.88889; -86.20194 (WXIN)
Links
Public license information
Websitefox59.com

WXIN (channel 59) is a television station in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States, affiliated with the Fox network. It is owned by Nexstar Media Group alongside Bloomington-licensed CBS affiliate WTTV, channel 4 (and its Kokomo-licensed satellite WTTK, channel 29). The stations share studios on Network Place (near 71st Street and I-465) in northwestern Indianapolis; WXIN's transmitter is located on West 73rd Street (or Westlane Road) on the northern outskirts of the city.

Channel 59 debuted as independent station WPDS-TV on February 1, 1984, broadcasting from studios on Meridian Street. Majority-owned by Anacomp, Inc., it was named for its founding owners: Ron Palamara, Chris Duffy, and Melvin and Herbert Simon. The station dabbled in production of local programs including a newscast, a late-night talk show, and a children's program. Within a year, the partners sold the station to Outlet Communications, which changed the call sign to WXIN in 1985 to reduce confusion with PBS and WTBS. An aggressive program purchasing policy and the financial troubles of WTTV, its chief competitor, made the station more competitive in the market, and the station joined Fox at its creation in 1986.

After more than two years on the market and an abortive sale to locally based Emmis Communications, Chase Broadcasting purchased WXIN in 1990. The station began airing a 10 p.m. newscast in 1991, but it was not until Tribune Broadcasting ownership that it grew beyond late news. A morning newscast debuted in 1999, and from 2004 to 2014, the station tripled its weekly news output with new and expanded newscasts in nearly every key daypart. Tribune acquired WTTV in 2002 and moved both stations the next year to their present studios in northwest Indianapolis. WTTV became a CBS affiliate in 2015 with a partially separate news operation.

History

WPDS-TV: Construction and early years

The first group to express interest in the long-dormant channel 59 in Indianapolis was a group backed by Clint Murchison, who proposed subscription television (STV) operation for the channel in 1978.[4] The group, Channel 59 of Indiana, formally filed that July.[5] United Television Corporation of Indiana (owned by United Cable) filed the next month with a similar plan.[6] That December, Indianapolis Television—a consortium of shopping mall and Indiana Pacers co-owner Melvin Simon, his brother Fred, and Gerald Kraft—filed for channel 59,[7] A fourth application, from Indianapolis 59 (subsidiary of a young Sinclair Broadcast Group), was also received.[8]

Indianapolis Television Corporation secured the channel in 1981 under the terms of a joint settlement, reimbursing its competitors a combined $128,300 in the process.[9] While it, too, had proposed subscription programming, changes in technology and the industry led the firm to hold off on building an STV outlet[10] and ultimately find the concept unviable.[11] The permit, initially with the call sign WSMK,[12] soon changed hands. In 1983, 80 percent of the stock in the company was sold to local computer services company Anacomp, Inc.; Melvin retained 10 percent, while his other brother, Herbert Simon, bought a 10-percent stake. The $800,000 acquisition produced capital to be invested in the construction of the station.[13] Anacomp was headed by Ron Palamara, while one of the vice presidents in Anacomp was Chris Duffy, who had been the general manager at WTHR for five years before joining Anacomp in 1981. The reconfigured ownership group, known as USA Communications, changed channel 59's call letters to WPDS-TV, after Palamara, Duffy and Simon's initials.[11]

Palamara had promised the station would be on air for the new year of 1984; due to weather delays, that turned into the Chinese New Year when WPDS-TV signed on February 1, 1984.[14][15] Originally operating as an independent station, channel 59 maintained a general entertainment programming format featuring cartoons, movies, classic sitcoms and drama series. The station originally operated from studios located at 1440 North Meridian Street along Indianapolis's "Media Row", which had previously been occupied by WFYI.[16] Under USA Communications, the station had a heavy emphasis on local programming. The station produced 59er Diner, a local kids' show, plus as exercise, gospel, and stand-up comedy programs,[17] as well as a late-night talk show, Night Talk with Dick Wolfsie.[18] A local news department also featured in channel 59's early months, including a half-hour 9 p.m. newscast; due to low ratings, this was scaled back to periodic news updates at the end of August.[19] Duffy told Richard K. Shull of The Indianapolis News, "I made a strategic error in how viewers perceive us. They see us as an entertainment vehicle. They look to the network stations for news."[20]

WXIN: Outlet ownership

Palamara, Duffy, and Simon sold the station to Outlet Communications (through its Atlin Communications subsidiary) in a deal announced in October 1984 and completed in February 1985. The $22 million transaction was touted as among the largest for a TV station in its first year of operation.[21][22] The station's call letters were then changed to the current WXIN on August 10, 1985, a decision precipitated not by the ownership change but by a desire to avoid confusion (particularly in ratings diaries) with the similar-sounding cable channel WTBS and PBS.[23][2] Under Outlet, the station maintained its competitiveness with established Indianapolis-market independent station WTTV; the station touted a total audience share of 7%, which it claimed was among the largest for a new independent in a top-35 market (only beaten by KTXH in Houston and WBFS-TV in Miami).[24]

WXIN became a charter affiliate of the Fox Broadcasting Company when the network launched on October 9, 1986.[25] With aggressive program purchases, the station eroded WTTV's market share[26] and moved ahead in the key early evening time slot of 6–8 p.m.,[27] aided by that station's multi-year bankruptcy.[28] However, these purchases also drained the bottom line.[29]

In December 1987, Outlet Communications put WXIN and WATL in Atlanta on the market to repay debt from the related company that owned both stations' licenses, Atlin Communications.[30] In May 1988, Emmis Communications, an Indianapolis-based radio station group owner, announced it would purchase the Indianapolis station for $17.5 million, marking its first television property.[31] Emmis, which had twice attempted to buy WTTV, needed a waiver to own WXIN as well as local radio station WENS.[28] Outlet's directors rebuffed the offer because its $15 million bid for WATL was seen as too low.[32] Emmis sued,[33] but the lawsuit was dismissed in federal court.[34] During the attempted Emmis purchase, WXIN won the rights to telecast Indiana Pacers basketball road games from WTTV, which had broadcast the team since 1974.[35] The relationship lasted five seasons, concluding in 1993 when WXIN was no longer able to air the team due to its commitment to Fox network programming.[36]

Chase and Renaissance ownership

The Atlin sale process came to an end in 1989, as Outlet agreed to sell WXIN and WATL, plus two radio stations in Washington, D.C., to Chase Broadcasting of Hartford, Connecticut, for $120 million. The purchase made Chase, which already owned WTIC-TV in Hartford and was buying KDVR in Denver, the largest single owner of Fox-affiliated stations[34] when it was concluded in March 1990.[37]

In 1991, Chase Broadcasting announced it would sell some or all of its properties in order to invest in new business ventures in Eastern Europe after the end of the Cold War, particularly successful cable television systems in Poland.[38] Four of its five Fox affiliates, including WXIN, were sold to Renaissance Broadcasting of Greenwich, Connecticut.[39] Renaissance was forced to tamp down rumors of a combination of WTTV and WXIN under common operation, with rumors suggesting either a local marketing agreement or the Fox affiliation moving outright to WTTV paired with a donation of channel 59.[40] These rumors surfaced again in 1996, when Sinclair Broadcast Group—having just acquired WTTV—was rumored as an acquirer for WXIN and the Renaissance group.[41]

Tribune ownership

Chicago-based Tribune Broadcasting bought Renaissance's television properties for $1.13 billion on July 7, 1996.[42]

Tribune acquired WTTV and its satellite station in Kokomo, WTTK (channel 29), from Sinclair on April 29, 2002;[43] this created the market's first television duopoly under current FCC regulations with WXIN when the purchase was finalized on July 24[44] With WXIN already at capacity in its existing building,[45] the company began investigating new sites for a larger facility, leaving behind Meridian Street, the "media row" home to all of the city's other major TV stations.[46] By year's end, zoning approval had been obtained for a site inside Intech Park on the northwest side of Indianapolis.[45] Construction began in January 2003, and the 51,200-square-foot (4,760 m2) facility was completed at the end of the year.[47]

Beginning in 2003, WXIN was the broadcast home for the state lottery game show Hoosier Millionaire, which had aired on WTTV. As part of the move, the show's hosts were changed to Cody Stark and Catt Sadler, who presented morning show Fox 59 a.m. at the time.[48] Hoosier Millionaire was canceled by the Indiana Lottery in 2005 due to declining ticket sales.[49] In 2006, the station picked up the rights to the Indianapolis Colts coaches' shows;[50] The shows later returned to WISH-TV. Beginning in 2015, WXIN and WTTV acquired the rights to all Colts preseason games and coaches' shows.[51]

WTTV became a CBS affiliate on January 1, 2015, with dedicated local newscasts but using some of the same staff.[52]

Sale to Nexstar Media Group

After a failed attempt by Sinclair Broadcast Group to acquire Tribune Media,[53] Nexstar Media Group announced in December 2018 that it would acquire the company.[54][55][56] Nexstar already owned WISH-TV and WNDY-TV, and due to FCC ownership rules and scrutiny, Nexstar was required to divest two of the stations; the company ultimately elected to sell WISH and WNDY to the owner of Bayou City Broadcasting, in favor of retaining WTTV and WXIN.[57] The deal closed on September 19, 2019.[58]

News operation

In late 1990, WXIN management began analyzing the creation of a local newscast after WTTV discontinued its local news effort.[59] The station also discussed contracting WISH-TV to produce the newscast after WTTV struck a deal to air a newscast produced by WRTV.[60] At the time, WTHR offered a 10 p.m. newscast as part of an early prime time experiment that was performing poorly.[61] The station opted to produce its own news effort and hired Jim Sanders from WGME in Portland, Maine, to serve as news director.[62]

With a news staff of 18,[63] Fox 59 Nightcast debuted on September 23, 1991, with the anchor team of Bob Donaldson, Caroline Thau, Chris Wright, and Brian Hammons.[64] Wright, a meteorologist, was the first Black man to be a lead anchor on a weeknight newscast in Indianapolis.[65] After just two weeks, the program was trimmed to a half-hour in length to appease fans of Star Trek: The Next Generation, which had originally been removed to make way for the news hour, and because WTTV recommitted to its newscast from WRTV.[66] Fox 59 Nightcast was launched days before Chase declared its intention to sell its TV stations, and Steve Hall of The Indianapolis Star felt the news department was doomed to be cut by any prospective buyer;[67] a rival general manager indicated to his employees that he believed WXIN would cancel the newscast within six weeks.[68] This did not come to pass. Fox named WXIN its affiliate of the year in 1992, citing Nightcast as a model for future news startups by Fox affiliates,[69] and the newscast—while second to WTTV's WRTV-produced newscast in total viewership—performed better in key young adult demographics.[70]

In 1994, the news department expanded into space at 1440 North Meridian previously used by radio station WZPL as its offices,[68] and that October, WXIN surpassed WTTV in 10 p.m. news total ratings for the first time.[71] Thau departed in 1995 and was replaced by Ginger Gadsden, the first Black woman to be the lead anchor of a late-night newscast in the market.[72] Nightcast was renamed Fox News at 10 in September 1995.[73] WTTV's WRTV-produced 10 p.m. newscast ceased airing on December 31, 2002, after Tribune's acquisition of that station; it had lived on until that point to help WTTV, which held the Indiana Lottery contract, comply with a provision that required drawing results to be broadcast within a newscast.[74]

WXIN expanded news programming outside its established 10 p.m. slot in April 1999, when it premiered Fox 59 a.m. Formatted as a mix of news, entertainment and lifestyle features with a looser, "personality-driven" style inspired by morning radio programs, the show initially aired from 6 to 9 a.m.[75][76][77] The program was reformatted as a more traditional morning newscast in 2004 and grew to beat competing local and national morning news programs in the 25–54 age demographic.[78]

In 2004, Jerry Martin took over as general manager of WXIN; under his tenure and that of successor Larry Delia, the station grew its news output considerably. On April 17, 2006, WXIN expanded its 10 p.m. newscast to one hour, the first in a series of news expansions.[79] These included a 5 a.m. hour of the morning newscast in 2008, a 5 p.m. newscast and three-hour weekend morning newscasts in 2010,[80][81] 4:30 and later 4 a.m. hours of the Fox 59 Morning News, an additional hour for the weekend morning newscasts,[82] a 6 p.m. newscast in 2012,[78] and 7 and 11 p.m. newscasts in 2014.[83] A station that had produced 21+12 hours weekly of local news in 2004[82] grew to 66 hours a week of news in 2014.[84]

WXIN debuted IN Focus, a half-hour Sunday morning program focusing on political and civic issues, on May 3, 2015.[85] A new local lifestyle show, Indy Now, was added to the station's schedule at 10 a.m. in 2021.[86]

Notable current on-air staff

Notable former on-air staff

Technical information

A red-and-white striped TV tower reaching tall into the sky
The WXIN and WTTK tower in Indianapolis

The station's signal is multiplexed:

Subchannels of WXIN[91]
Channel Res. Aspect Short name Programming
59.1 720p 16:9 WXIN-DT Main WXIN programming / Fox
59.2 480i 4:3 AntTV Antenna TV
59.3 16:9 Rewind Rewind TV
59.4 Charge! Charge!
29.1 1080i 16:9 WTTK-DT CBS (WTTK)
  Broadcast on behalf of another station

WXIN began broadcasting a digital signal on UHF channel 45 on October 28, 1999.[92] It shut down its analog signal, over UHF channel 59, on June 12, 2009—the official date on which full-power television stations in the United States transitioned from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate.[93] The station's digital signal continued to broadcast on its pre-transition channel 45.[94]

WXIN moved its digital signal from channel 45 to channel 22 on October 18, 2019, as a result of the 2016 United States wireless spectrum auction.[95][96]

References

  1. ^ "Commercial Broadcast Stations Biennial Ownership Report (FCC Form 323)". Federal Communications Commission. January 31, 2020. p. 11. Archived from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved February 2, 2020.
  2. ^ a b Roysdon, Keith (August 10, 1985). "Indy station gets a more memorable name". Muncie Evening Press. Muncie, Indiana. p. T-2. Archived from the original on August 30, 2022. Retrieved August 30, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Facility Technical Data for WXIN". Licensing and Management System. Federal Communications Commission.
  4. ^ Shull, Richard K. (April 6, 1978). "Planning Another Pay-TV System Here". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. 23. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ Rohn, David (July 20, 1978). "Firm Asks FCC For Pay TV System". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. 9. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "2d Firm Wants Channel 59 Here For Pay Video". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. August 11, 1978. p. 29. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Simon Applies For Channel 59". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. December 28, 1978. p. 15. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "TV Applications" (PDF). Broadcasting Yearbook. 1981. p. C-184. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  9. ^ "Indianapolis TV proceeding" (PDF). Broadcasting. October 12, 1981. p. 112. ProQuest 962735689. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  10. ^ Shull, Richard K. (July 19, 1982). "New Technology Hurts 2 Local Cable TV Firms". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. pp. 1, 15. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ a b Shull, Richard K. (March 18, 1983). "New Station, Familiar Names". The Indianapolis News. p. 17. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  12. ^ FCC History Cards for WXIN
  13. ^ "Changing Hands" (PDF). Broadcasting. July 25, 1983. p. 88. ProQuest 1014711134. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  14. ^ Shull, Richard K. (January 26, 1984). "One New Year's Eve About Like Another". Indianapolis News. p. 15. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  15. ^ "Happy (Chinese) New Year". Indianapolis News. February 1, 1984. p. 11. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  16. ^ Inman, Julia (July 12, 1983). "TV Scene: Channel 59 gets green light". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. 11. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ Allan, Marc D. (April 20, 2001). "Retiring Duffy's glad he stuck with job choice". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. E7. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Midnight show for WPDS". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. August 16, 1984. p. 33. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ Hanshew, Dennis (August 31, 1984). "Daytime reports to continue: WPDS to drop nightly news". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. 31. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "That's All There Is, Folks". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. August 30, 1984. p. 9. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ Schoch, Eric B. (October 12, 1984). "Channel 59 sold for $22 million". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. pp. 1, 12. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "Outlet takes over city's Channel 59". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. February 2, 1985. p. 33. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ Norberg, John (July 16, 1985). "WPDS makes name change to avoid confusion on cable". Journal and Courier. Lafayette, Indiana. p. C-3. Archived from the original on August 30, 2022. Retrieved August 30, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ Shull, Richard K. (April 24, 1986). "Without 'sniglets,' Hall can be fun". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. 15. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "Fox network begins to take shape" (PDF). Broadcasting. August 4, 1986. pp. 44–45. ProQuest 963254490. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 27, 2022. Retrieved March 11, 2023.
  26. ^ "New TV station's future cloudy". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. June 23, 1987. pp. 21, 25. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ Barton, Christopher (October 18, 1988). "New owner investing in Channel 4". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. C-2. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ a b Koenig, Bill (July 2, 1988). "Emmis seeks waiver to keep station". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. B-5. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ Rush, Jill (December 28, 1987). "Channel 59 on Sale Block Again". Indianapolis Business Journal. ProQuest 220600114.
  30. ^ "Local TV station WXIN up for sale". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. December 29, 1987. p. C-8. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ Barton, Christopher (May 17, 1988). "Locally owned Emmis to buy WXIN for $17.5 million". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. pp. C-1, C-4. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ Koenig, Bill (July 6, 1988). "Directors reject Emmis' bid for WXIN". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. B-6. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ "Emmis sues over WXIN sale". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. July 29, 1988. p. B-4. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ a b Koenig, Bill (August 10, 1989). "Connecticut firm to buy Channel 59". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. C-1. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ Hittler, Jeff (June 3, 1988). "Local stations in sports programming war". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. B-5. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ Hall, Steve (June 26, 1993). "Syrupy show pours it on to laud athletes". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. C9. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ Hall, Steve (March 28, 1990). "News trends disturb TV reporter". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. A-11. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ Williams, Stephen M.; Endrst, James (October 1, 1991). "Chase firm seeks partner or buyer in media holdings". Hartford Courant. Hartford, Connecticut. p. D1, D5. Archived from the original on August 23, 2022. Retrieved August 23, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ Williams, Stephen M.; Lender, Jon (September 5, 1992). "Chase agrees to sell WTIC-TV to rival". Hartford Courant. Archived from the original on October 24, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2015.
  40. ^ Kukolla, Steve (July 6, 1992). "NYC Firm Makes Play for Ch. 59". Indianapolis Business Journal. ProQuest 220609559.
  41. ^ Perrone, Ellen (April 22, 1996). "Sinclair may add WXIN 59 to stable". Indianapolis Business Journal. ProQuest 220601894. Archived from the original on July 21, 2015. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  42. ^ Rathbun, Elizabeth A. (July 8, 1996). "Tribune's renaissance: $1.13-billion purchase of six more TVs brings broadcaster into one-third of U.S. homes". Broadcasting & Cable. Cahners Business Information. ProQuest 225355958. Archived from the original on September 12, 2014. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  43. ^ "Tribune Co. lands duopoly in Indy with WTTV buy". Indianapolis Business Journal. April 29, 2002. Archived from the original on August 14, 2014. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  44. ^ "Tribune wraps up purchase of WTTV". Indianapolis Business Journal. July 29, 2002. Archived from the original on August 14, 2014. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  45. ^ a b Muirragui Davis, Andrea (December 2, 2002). "Tribune Co. stations eye Intech Park location". Indianapolis Business Journal. p. 11. ProQuest 220619275.
  46. ^ Maurer, Katie (July 15, 2002). "Stations may merge offices on north side". Indianapolis Business Journal. p. 5. ProQuest 220616762.
  47. ^ "WXIN-TV Channel 59 and WTTV-TV Channel 4 are making their move". Indianapolis Business Journal. December 22, 2003. Gale A112023573. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  48. ^ Allan, Marc D. (March 29, 2003). "'Hoosier Millionaire' jumping to new station, dumping hosts". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. pp. B1, B5. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  49. ^ "'Hoosier Millionaire' signing off Nov. 19". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. October 15, 2005. p. B7. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  50. ^ Schoettle, Anthony (May 29, 2006). "Colts, Tribune sign deal to air shows on WXIN: WISH makes own adjustments in wake of change". Indianapolis Business Journal. ProQuest 220632916. Archived from the original on July 21, 2015. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  51. ^ "Colts change TV broadcast partner to WXIN/WTTV". Indianapolis Business Journal. January 5, 2015. Gale A398627644.
  52. ^ Schoettle, Anthony (October 6, 2014). "WTTV may go after big-name talent to join news team". Indianapolis Business Journal. p. 7. ProQuest 1609320681.
  53. ^ Dinsmore, Christopher (August 9, 2018). "Tribune Media pulls out of Sinclair Broadcast merger". Baltimore Sun. Tribune Publishing. Archived from the original on April 6, 2019. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  54. ^ Lafayette, Jon (December 3, 2018). "Nexstar Announces Deal to Buy Tribune for $6.4B". Broadcasting & Cable. NewBay Media. Archived from the original on April 5, 2019. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  55. ^ Jacobson, Adam (December 3, 2018). "It's Official: Nexstar Takes Tribune In Billion-Dollar Stock Deal". Radio-Television Business Report. Streamline-RBR, Inc. Archived from the original on December 4, 2018. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  56. ^ Jessell, Harry A.; Miller, Mark K. (December 3, 2018). "Nexstar To Spin Off $1B In Stations". TVNewsCheck. NewsCheck Media. Archived from the original on December 4, 2018. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  57. ^ Ryckaert, Vic (April 8, 2019). "Indianapolis native buys WISH-TV and WNDY-TV for $42.5 million". The Indianapolis Star. Archived from the original on April 9, 2019. Retrieved April 15, 2019.
  58. ^ Littleton, Cynthia (September 19, 2019). "Nexstar Completes Tribune Acquisition, Sean Compton to Head Programming". Variety. Archived from the original on September 20, 2019. Retrieved September 19, 2019.
  59. ^ Hall, Steve (November 15, 1990). "Laughing it up for horror film". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. B-9. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  60. ^ Hall, Steve (March 30, 1991). "WISH news on WXIN?". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. C-11. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  61. ^ Dooms, Tracey M. (July 8, 1991). "Film at 11?". Indianapolis Business Journal. Gale A11104678.
  62. ^ Hall, Steve (June 28, 1991). "Anywhere she goes, she knows how to act". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. D-11. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  63. ^ Hall, Steve (August 9, 1991). "WXIN hopes news can out-finesse competition". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. D-13. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  64. ^ "59 news chief preparing to deliver 'baby'". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. September 19, 1991. pp. C-1, C-7. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  65. ^ "Wright to leave WXIN post: Meteorologist wants more daily newscasts". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. June 10, 1995. p. C-1. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  66. ^ Hall, Steve (October 5, 1991). "WXIN's 10 p.m. news cut back to half hour". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. C-1. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  67. ^ Hall, Steve (October 17, 1991). "'Nightcast' is looking more like an outcast". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. B-5. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  68. ^ a b Hall, Steve (January 27, 1994). "WXIN survives naysayers and critics by gearing up for 10th anniversary". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. pp. D-1, D-2. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  69. ^ Hall, Steve (June 30, 1992). "Indy stations big Emmy winners". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. C-5. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  70. ^ "'6 News at 10' will broadcast 7 days a week". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. September 14, 1992. p. D-2. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  71. ^ "Channel 59 tops out". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. October 29, 1994. p. E-4. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 13, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  72. ^ Garmel, Marion (July 11, 1995). "WXIN names Gadsden as its new nightly anchor". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. C-5. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  73. ^ Garmel, Marion (August 31, 1995). "Same game, different name at Fox". The Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. D-7. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  74. ^ Muirragui Davis, Andrea (December 23, 2002). "Channel 6 early news may sign off Dec. 31". Indianapolis Business Journal. ProQuest 220634671.
  75. ^ Trigoboff, Dan (December 14, 1998). "Wake-up call". Broadcasting & Cable. p. 42. ProQuest 225352834.
  76. ^ Rettig, Ellen (February 8, 1999). "Channel 59 bets on mornings". Indianapolis Business Journal. ProQuest 220609319. Archived from the original on June 27, 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2019.
  77. ^ Hall, Steve (April 8, 1999). "'Fox 59 a.m.' playful but needs work". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. E11. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  78. ^ a b Morris, Greg (September 8, 2012). "Fox 59 is serious about local news". Indianapolis Business Journal. Archived from the original on March 14, 2013. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
  79. ^ Romano, Allison (June 12, 2006). "Late News Gets Earlier". Broadcasting & Cable. ProQuest 225317902. Archived from the original on June 27, 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2019.
  80. ^ "Fox59 adds more newscasts". WXIN. June 10, 2010. Archived from the original on July 22, 2011.
  81. ^ "WXIN expanding its news programming". Indianapolis Business Journal. June 10, 2010. Archived from the original on July 15, 2010. Retrieved July 31, 2010.
  82. ^ a b Allan, Marc D. (November 1, 2010). "FOX fattens up on news". Indianapolis Business Journal. ProQuest 814779065.
  83. ^ O'Malley, Chris (May 5, 2014). "WXIN ups ante in local news arms race: station hires ex-WTHR anchor for 11 p.m. 'NewsPoint'". Indianapolis Business Journal. Gale A368074988.
  84. ^ Malone, Michael (April 28, 2014). "WXIN Indianapolis Adding 7, 11 P.M. News". Archived from the original on October 9, 2023. Retrieved April 14, 2024.
  85. ^ Spehler, Dan (May 1, 2015). "IN Focus: FOX59 launches weekly issues, political program". WXIN. Tribune Media. Archived from the original on July 26, 2015. Retrieved August 22, 2015.
  86. ^ Malone, Michael (August 17, 2021). "WXIN Indianapolis Debuts Lifestyle Show 'Indy Now' Sept. 13". Archived from the original on February 8, 2023. Retrieved April 14, 2024.
  87. ^ Mack, Justin L. (May 22, 2020). "Fox59 anchor Thackston reveals cancer diagnosis". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. 7A. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  88. ^ Hays, Holly V. (May 22, 2021). "Fox59's Lindy Thackston announces on-air return". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. 2A. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  89. ^ Mack, Justin L. (January 30, 2019). "Hasnie to leave Fox59 for Fox News". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. p. 5A. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  90. ^ "Local TV alum hosts cable show". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. February 15, 2006. p. B3. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  91. ^ "TV Query for WXIN". RabbitEars. Archived from the original on April 19, 2023. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
  92. ^ "WXIN-DT". Television and Cable Factbook. 2006. p. A-841.
  93. ^ "Making the switch: TV viewers ready for digital transition". The Republic. Columbus, Indiana. June 10, 2009. p. A7. Archived from the original on April 14, 2024. Retrieved April 14, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  94. ^ "DTV Tentative Channel Designations for the First and Second Rounds" (PDF). Federal Communications Commission. May 23, 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 29, 2013. Retrieved August 29, 2021.
  95. ^ "FCC TV Spectrum Phase Assignment Table" (CSV). Federal Communications Commission. April 13, 2017. Archived from the original on April 17, 2017. Retrieved April 17, 2017.
  96. ^ "Antenna users must rescan on Oct. 18 to keep watching FOX59". Fox59. September 12, 2019. Archived from the original on March 24, 2023. Retrieved April 14, 2024.