United States micropolitan statistical areas (μSA, where the initial Greek letter mu represents "micro-"), as defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), are labor market and statistical areas in the United States centered on an urban cluster (urban area) with a population of at least 10,000 but fewer than 50,000 people.[1] The micropolitan area designation was created in 2003. Like the better-known metropolitan statistical areas, a micropolitan area is a geographic entity used for statistical purposes based on counties and county equivalents.[1] On July 21, 2023, the Office of Management and Budget released revised delineations of the various CBSAs in the United States, which recognized 542 micropolitan areas in the United States, four of which are in Puerto Rico.[2]

The term "micropolitan" gained currency in the 1990s to describe growing population centers in the United States that are removed from larger cities, in some cases by 100 miles (160 km) or more.

Micropolitan cities do not have the economic or political importance of large cities, but are nevertheless significant centers of population and production, drawing workers and shoppers from a wide local area. Because the designation is based on the core urban cluster's population and not on that of the whole area, some micropolitan areas are much larger than other metropolitan areas. For example, the Ottawa, IL Micropolitan Statistical Area had a 2010 census population of 154,908. That would put its total population ahead of roughly 100 individual locations classified as a metropolitan statistical area in 2010. The largest of the areas, around Claremont and Lebanon, New Hampshire, had a population in excess of 218,000 in 2010; Claremont's population was only 13,355 in that year's census,[3] and Lebanon's population was only 13,151.[4]

An enlargeable map of the 939 core-based statistical areas (CBSAs) of the United States and Puerto Rico as of 2020. The 392 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) are shown in medium green. The 547 micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs) are shown in light green.

United States

The following sortable table lists the 538 μSAs of the incorporated United States (the 50 states and the District of Columbia) with the following information:

  1. The μSA rank by population as of July 1, 2023, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau[5]
  2. The μSA name as designated by the United States Office of Management and Budget[6]
  3. The μSA population as of July 1, 2023, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau[5]
  4. The μSA population as of April 1, 2020, as enumerated by the 2020 United States census[5][a]
  5. The percent μSA population change from April 1, 2020, to July 1, 2023[5]
  6. The combined statistical area (CSA)[7] if it is designated and the μSA is a component[6]

Puerto Rico

The following sortable table lists the 4 μSAs (USAs) of Puerto Rico with the following information:

  1. The μSA rank by population as of July 1, 2023, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau[5]
  2. The μSA name as designated by the United States Office of Management and Budget[6]
  3. The μSA population as of July 1, 2023, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau[5]
  4. The μSA population as of April 1, 2020, as enumerated by the 2020 United States census[5][a]
  5. The percent USA population change from April 1, 2020, to July 1, 2023[5]
  6. The combined statistical area (CSA)[7] if the MSA is a component[6]
μSAs of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
Rank Micropolitan statistical area 2023 estimate 2020 census Change Encompassing combined statistical area
1 Coamo, PR μSA 53,355 54,949 −2.90% Ponce–Coamo, PR Combined Statistical Area
2 Lares, PR μSA 27,729 28,105 −1.34% San Juan–Bayamón, PR Combined Statistical Area
3 Utuado, PR μSA 27,242 28,287 −3.69% San Juan–Bayamón, PR Combined Statistical Area
4 Coco, PR μSA 24,718 25,789 −4.15% San Juan–Bayamón, PR Combined Statistical Area

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Populations adjusted for new μSA delineations as redefined in 2023

References

  1. ^ a b OMB BULLETIN NO. 10-02
  2. ^ Executive Office of the President (July 21, 2023). "Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF) (Press release). Retrieved July 21, 2023.
  3. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Claremont city, New Hampshire". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved August 30, 2017.
  4. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Lebanon city, New Hampshire". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved August 30, 2017.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h "Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas Population Totals: 2020-2023". United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 14, 2024. Retrieved March 16, 2024.
  6. ^ a b c d "OMB Bulletin No. 20-01: Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF). United States Office of Management and Budget. March 6, 2020. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  7. ^ a b The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a CSA (CSA) as an aggregate of adjacent core-based statistical areas that are linked by commuting ties.