Barron County
Cumberland Public Library
Map of Wisconsin highlighting Barron County
Location within the U.S. state of Wisconsin
Map of the United States highlighting Wisconsin
Wisconsin's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 45°25′N 91°51′W / 45.42°N 91.85°W / 45.42; -91.85
Country United States
State Wisconsin
Founded1874
Named forHenry D. Barron
SeatBarron
Largest cityRice Lake
Area
 • Total890 sq mi (2,300 km2)
 • Land863 sq mi (2,240 km2)
 • Water27 sq mi (70 km2)  3.0%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total46,711
 • Density54.1/sq mi (20.9/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district7th
Websitewww.barroncountywi.gov

Barron County is a county located in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2020 census, the population was 46,711.[1] Its county seat is Barron.[2] The county was created in 1859 and later organized in 1874.[3]

History

The county was created in 1859[4] as Dallas County (named after Vice President George M. Dallas), with the county seat located at Barron. It was renamed Barron County on March 4, 1869. The county took the name Barron in honor of Wisconsin lawyer and politician Henry D. Barron, who served as circuit judge of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit.[5][6] Barron County was organized in 1874.[3] In the late 1800s and early 1900s a community of Russian immigrants moved to Barron County.[7]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 890 square miles (2,300 km2), of which 863 square miles (2,240 km2) is land and 27 square miles (70 km2) (3.0%) is water.[8]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

The county sign for Barron County on County G
The county sign for Barron County on County G

Railroads

Buses

Airports

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
186013
18705384,038.5%
18807,0241,205.6%
189015,416119.5%
190023,67753.6%
191029,11423.0%
192034,28117.7%
193034,3010.1%
194034,2890.0%
195034,7031.2%
196034,270−1.2%
197033,955−0.9%
198038,73014.1%
199040,7505.2%
200044,96310.3%
201045,8702.0%
202046,7111.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790–1960[10] 1900–1990[11]
1990–2000[12] 2010[13] 2020[1]

2020 census

As of the census of 2020,[1] the population was 46,711. The population density was 54.1 inhabitants per square mile (20.9/km2). There were 23,779 housing units at an average density of 27.6 per square mile (10.7/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 91.1% White, 1.8% Black or African American, 1.0% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 1.2% from other races, and 4.2% from two or more races. Ethnically, the population was 2.7% Hispanic or Latino of any race.

2000 census

2000 Census Age Pyramid for Barron County
2000 Census Age Pyramid for Barron County

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 44,963 people, 17,851 households, and 12,352 families residing in the county. The population density was 52 people per square mile (20/km2). There were 20,969 housing units at an average density of 24 per square mile (9/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.69% White, 0.14% Black or African American, 0.81% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races. 0.96% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 34.4% were of German, 21.8% Norwegian and 5.3% Irish ancestry.

There were 17,851 households, out of which 31.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.90% were married couples living together, 8.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.80% were non-families. 25.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.30% under the age of 18, 8.10% from 18 to 24, 26.80% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 16.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 98.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.00 males.

In 2017, there were 504 births, giving a general fertility rate of 70.6 births per 1000 women aged 15–44, the 15th highest rate out of all 72 Wisconsin counties.[15] Additionally, there were fewer than five reported induced abortions performed on women of Barron County residence in 2017.[16]

Communities

Cities

Villages

Towns

Census-designated place

Unincorporated communities

Politics

United States presidential election results for Barron County, Wisconsin[17][18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 15,803 62.35% 9,194 36.27% 349 1.38%
2016 13,614 60.05% 7,889 34.80% 1,168 5.15%
2012 11,443 50.43% 10,890 47.99% 359 1.58%
2008 10,457 45.69% 12,078 52.77% 351 1.53%
2004 12,030 50.26% 11,696 48.86% 211 0.88%
2000 9,848 49.48% 8,928 44.86% 1,128 5.67%
1996 6,158 35.82% 8,025 46.68% 3,008 17.50%
1992 6,572 32.49% 8,063 39.86% 5,595 27.66%
1988 8,527 48.53% 8,951 50.94% 92 0.52%
1984 9,587 53.94% 8,061 45.36% 124 0.70%
1980 8,791 47.05% 8,654 46.32% 1,240 6.64%
1976 7,393 45.13% 8,678 52.97% 311 1.90%
1972 8,418 59.94% 5,376 38.28% 251 1.79%
1968 7,526 55.38% 5,183 38.14% 880 6.48%
1964 5,701 40.56% 8,332 59.28% 23 0.16%
1960 8,640 57.05% 6,464 42.68% 41 0.27%
1956 8,634 61.12% 5,419 38.36% 73 0.52%
1952 10,013 66.84% 4,902 32.72% 66 0.44%
1948 5,516 45.91% 6,148 51.17% 352 2.93%
1944 7,137 55.66% 5,585 43.55% 101 0.79%
1940 7,806 54.87% 6,183 43.46% 238 1.67%
1936 5,067 37.94% 7,419 55.55% 869 6.51%
1932 3,852 32.92% 7,413 63.35% 436 3.73%
1928 8,455 71.98% 3,185 27.12% 106 0.90%
1924 2,703 29.44% 377 4.11% 6,100 66.45%
1920 6,887 84.23% 742 9.08% 547 6.69%
1916 2,746 54.95% 1,863 37.28% 388 7.76%
1912 1,414 35.62% 1,065 26.83% 1,491 37.56%
1908 3,247 66.46% 1,266 25.91% 373 7.63%
1904 3,575 78.30% 625 13.69% 366 8.02%
1900 2,950 72.77% 943 23.26% 161 3.97%
1896 2,772 64.74% 1,324 30.92% 186 4.34%
1892 1,818 57.37% 767 24.20% 584 18.43%


See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "2020 Decennial Census: Barron County, Wisconsin". data.census.gov. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 6, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on July 12, 2012. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ a b "Wisconsin: Individual County Chronologies". Wisconsin Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. Archived from the original on April 14, 2017. Retrieved August 12, 2015.
  4. ^ Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau (comp.) State of Wisconsin 1991-1992 Blue Book. Madison: Author, 1991, p. 731.
  5. ^ Dictionary of Wisconsin History (Wisconsin Historical Society)
  6. ^ "Here's How Iron Got Its Name". The Rhinelander Daily News. June 16, 1932. p. 2. Retrieved August 24, 2014 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  7. ^ "Russians in Wisconsin". August 3, 2012.
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  11. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  13. ^ "2020 Census Population and Housing Map". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on December 5, 2021. Retrieved December 5, 2021.
  14. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  15. ^ "Annual Wisconsin Birth and Infant Mortality Report, 2017 P-01161-19 (June 2019): Detailed Tables". Archived from the original on June 19, 2019. Retrieved June 20, 2019.
  16. ^ Reported Induced Abortions in Wisconsin, Office of Health Informatics, Division of Public Health, Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Section: Trend Information, 2013-2017, Table 18, pages 17-18
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  18. ^ The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 968 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 265 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 253 votes, and Independent candidate Arthur Reimer received 5 votes.

Further reading

Coordinates: 45°25′N 91°51′W / 45.42°N 91.85°W / 45.42; -91.85