Simpson County
Old Simpson County Courthouse in Franklin
Map of Kentucky highlighting Simpson County
Location within the U.S. state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°44′N 86°35′W / 36.74°N 86.58°W / 36.74; -86.58
Country United States
State Kentucky
Founded1819
Named forJohn Simpson
SeatFranklin
Largest cityFranklin
Government
 • County Judge Executive


Justices of The Peace
Mason Barnes


Marty Chandler

Nathaniel Downey

Scott Poston

Myron Thurman
Area
 • Total236 sq mi (610 km2)
 • Land234 sq mi (610 km2)
 • Water2.3 sq mi (6 km2)  1.0%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total19,594 Increase
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitehttp://www.simpsoncounty.us/

Simpson County is a county located in the south central portion of the U.S. state of Kentucky. Its county seat is Franklin.[1]

History

Simpson County was established in 1819 from Allen, Logan, and Warren Counties.[2] The county is named for Captain John Simpson, a Kentucky militia officer who fought in Battle of Fallen Timbers in the Northwest Indian War, and was killed during the War of 1812 in the Battle of River Raisin.[3]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 236 square miles (610 km2), of which 234 square miles (610 km2) is land and 2.3 square miles (6.0 km2) (1.0%) is water.[4] The county is located in the Pennyroyal Plateau region of the state.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18204,852
18305,81519.8%
18406,53712.4%
18507,73318.3%
18608,1465.3%
18709,57317.5%
188010,64111.2%
189010,8782.2%
190011,6246.9%
191011,460−1.4%
192011,150−2.7%
193011,3361.7%
194011,7523.7%
195011,678−0.6%
196011,548−1.1%
197013,05413.0%
198014,67312.4%
199015,1453.2%
200016,4058.3%
201017,3275.6%
202019,59413.1%
2021 (est.)19,7180.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2021[9]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 16,405 people, 6,415 households, and 4,638 families residing in the county. The population density was 70 per square mile (27/km2). There were 7,016 housing units at an average density of 30 per square mile (12/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 87.84% White, 10.22% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.55% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.30% from other races, and 0.87% from two or more races. 0.91% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race.

There were 6,415 households, out of which 33.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.80% were married couples living together, 11.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.70% were non-families. 24.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.97.

The age distribution was 26.20% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 29.20% from 25 to 44, 23.00% from 45 to 64, and 13.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 95.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,432, and the median income for a family was $42,525. Males had a median income of $32,160 versus $22,667 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,150. About 8.50% of families and 11.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.00% of those under age 18 and 15.90% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

City

Unincorporated communities

Politics

In contrast to the Western Coalfield and the eastern part of the Pennyroyal Plateau, Simpson County was not highly pro-Union during the Civil War.[11] Consequently, Simpson was as reliably Democratic as the Jackson Purchase and Bluegrass during the following century: no Republican carried Simpson County until Richard Nixon’s 1972 landslide. As with all of rural Kentucky, the social liberalism of the Democratic Party – rejected by many southern whites[12] – has led to an increase in registered Republicans, and many people registered as Democrats vote for Republican candidates, especially at the national level. In 2014, of a population of 17,800, there were 12,700 registered voters in Simpson County: 8,040 (63%) were Democrats, 3,587 (28%) were Republican, and 1073 (9%) were unaffiliated or registered with another party.[13]

United States presidential election results for Simpson County, Kentucky[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,888 67.43% 2,681 30.70% 163 1.87%
2016 5,077 67.41% 2,144 28.47% 310 4.12%
2012 4,355 61.40% 2,650 37.36% 88 1.24%
2008 4,437 60.71% 2,775 37.97% 97 1.33%
2004 4,273 60.67% 2,730 38.76% 40 0.57%
2000 3,169 54.41% 2,583 44.35% 72 1.24%
1996 2,186 40.80% 2,749 51.31% 423 7.89%
1992 2,280 39.04% 2,834 48.53% 726 12.43%
1988 2,699 55.55% 2,138 44.00% 22 0.45%
1984 3,073 58.69% 2,140 40.87% 23 0.44%
1980 2,020 41.92% 2,713 56.30% 86 1.78%
1976 1,481 34.45% 2,782 64.71% 36 0.84%
1972 2,285 62.57% 1,325 36.28% 42 1.15%
1968 1,435 33.07% 1,505 34.69% 1,399 32.24%
1964 967 23.33% 3,168 76.45% 9 0.22%
1960 1,927 42.18% 2,642 57.82% 0 0.00%
1956 1,454 33.43% 2,879 66.18% 17 0.39%
1952 1,310 32.43% 2,724 67.43% 6 0.15%
1948 762 20.46% 2,752 73.90% 210 5.64%
1944 1,012 26.29% 2,821 73.27% 17 0.44%
1940 987 25.02% 2,950 74.78% 8 0.20%
1936 1,240 28.97% 3,027 70.72% 13 0.30%
1932 1,203 24.92% 3,603 74.64% 21 0.44%
1928 1,635 39.64% 2,490 60.36% 0 0.00%
1924 1,294 32.08% 2,688 66.63% 52 1.29%
1920 1,680 34.24% 3,206 65.34% 21 0.43%
1916 955 33.41% 1,887 66.03% 16 0.56%
1912 547 20.96% 1,639 62.80% 424 16.25%


See also

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. ^ Atlas of Historical County Boundaries, Kentucky
  3. ^ The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 1. Kentucky State Historical Society. 1903. pp. 37.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved August 20, 2014.
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 20, 2014.
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 20, 2014.
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 20, 2014.
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 20, 2014.
  9. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2014.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  11. ^ Copeland, James E.; ‘Where Were the Kentucky Unionists and Secessionists’; The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, volume 71, no. 4 (October, 1973), pp. 344-363
  12. ^ Cohn, Nate; ‘Demographic Shift: Southern Whites’ Loyalty to G.O.P. Nearing That of Blacks to Democrats’, New York Times, April 24, 2014
  13. ^ KY VOTER REGISTRATION STATISTICS REPORT
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 6, 2018.

Sources

Coordinates: 36°44′N 86°35′W / 36.74°N 86.58°W / 36.74; -86.58