Independence, Kentucky
Kenton County Courthouse
Kenton County Courthouse
Flag of Independence, Kentucky
Location in Kenton County, Kentucky
Location in Kenton County, Kentucky
Coordinates: 38°57′04″N 84°32′59″W / 38.95111°N 84.54972°W / 38.95111; -84.54972
CountryUnited States
StateKentucky
CountyKenton
Named forEstablishment of Kenton County
Government
 • MayorChris Reinersman
Area
 • Total17.80 sq mi (46.11 km2)
 • Land17.56 sq mi (45.49 km2)
 • Water0.24 sq mi (0.62 km2)
Elevation774 ft (236 m)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total28,676
 • Estimate 
(2022)[3]
29,326
 • Density1,632.66/sq mi (630.36/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP code
41051[2]
Area code859
FIPS code21-39142
GNIS feature ID2404755
Websitewww.cityofindependence.org

Independence is a home rule-class city in Kenton County, Kentucky, United States.[4] It is one of its county's two seats of government. The population was 28,676 at the time of the 2020 census. It is the third largest city in Northern Kentucky after Covington and Florence, and is part of the Cincinnati metropolitan area.

History

Mural depicting the Kenton County Courthouse and Simon Kenton High School.

The area post office was established by Isaac Everett in 1837 as "Everett's Creek"; in 1838, this was changed to "Crews Creek" (presumably after the present Cruises Creek that is south of the city); in 1839, Thomas Hordern renamed it "Bagby".[5]

In 1840, Kenton was formed from Campbell and Boone counties. Local farmer John McCollum donated a site at the center of the new county to be its seat of governance, and the name "Independence" was chosen to honor the liberation of locals from Campbell County.[5] The post office was renamed the same year. Quickly settled, Independence was formally incorporated by the state assembly in 1842.[6][7]

Because the majority of the county's population resided along the Ohio River, Independence was eventually obliged to share its status as county seat with the larger city of Covington, a situation later repeated in Campbell County between the centrally-located Alexandria and the larger, riverside Newport.

Geography

Independence is located in central Kenton County. It is bordered to the northwest by Elsmere, to the north by Erlanger and Covington, and to the northeast by Ryland Heights. The western border of Independence follows the Boone County line, and the city of Florence in Boone County borders the far northwestern end of Independence.

The original center of Independence is in the southeast part of the city, along Madison Pike. Kentucky Route 17, a four-lane divided highway, passes just east of the city center, leading north 11 miles (18 km) to downtown Covington and south 27 miles (43 km) to Falmouth.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Independence has a total area of 17.70 square miles (45.83 km2), of which 17.44 square miles (45.16 km2) are land and 0.26 square miles (0.67 km2), or 1.45%, are water.[8] Banklick Creek, a northeast-flowing tributary of the Licking River, is the largest stream in the city, draining most of the area within the city limits.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1850182
18601893.8%
1870134−29.1%
188016523.1%
1900193
1910153−20.7%
19201530.0%
193026069.9%
1940253−2.7%
195028512.6%
19603098.4%
19701,715455.0%
19807,998366.4%
199010,44430.6%
200014,98243.5%
201024,75765.2%
202028,67615.8%
2022 (est.)29,326[9]2.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 14,982 people, 5,181 households, and 4,149 families residing in the city. The population density was 893.2 inhabitants per square mile (344.9/km2). There were 5,391 housing units at an average density of 321.4 per square mile (124.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.20% White, 0.96% African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.40% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.36% from other races, and 0.87% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.15% of the population.

There were 5,181 households, out of which 44.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.9% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.9% were non-families. 15.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 3.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.21.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 30.4% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 35.3% from 25 to 44, 18.5% from 45 to 64, and 6.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 101.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $51,002, and the median income for a family was $55,030. Males had a median income of $39,213 versus $26,807 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,191. About 5.4% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.2% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Major employers in Independence include Balluff,[12] Cengage Learning, Krauss Maffei, Mazak,[13] and Rotek.[14][15]

Culture

Independence is served by a branch of the Kenton County Public Library.[16]

Parks and recreation

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Education

* Some members of the community are districted for Woodland Middle School and Scott High School as well.

Infrastructure

References

  1. ^ "2020 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 18, 2022.
  2. ^ a b U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Independence, Kentucky
  3. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places in Kentucky: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2022". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 26, 2023.
  4. ^ "Summary and Reference Guide to House Bill 331 City Classification Reform" (PDF). Kentucky League of Cities. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  5. ^ a b Rennick, Robert M. (1987). Kentucky Place Names. University Press of Kentucky. p. 148. Retrieved April 28, 2013.
  6. ^ Collins, Lewis (1877). History of Kentucky. p. 420.
  7. ^ Commonwealth of Kentucky. Office of the Secretary of State. Land Office. "Independence, Kentucky". Accessed 29 July 2013.
  8. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Independence city, Kentucky". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2019.[dead link]
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places in Kentucky: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2022". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 26, 2023.
  10. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  12. ^ Balluff Inc. breaks ground on 3rd expansion in Independence
  13. ^ "Mazak expands, renovates in Elsmere". cincinnati.com. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  14. ^ 2015 NKY 200 Archived June 23, 2015, at the Wayback Machine
  15. ^ Independence City Businesses
  16. ^ "William E. Durr Branch". Kenton County Public Library. Retrieved February 24, 2018.
  17. ^ "Beechgrove Elementary School". Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  18. ^ "Community Christian Academy". ccaky.org. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  19. ^ "Kenton Elementary School". Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  20. ^ "Summit View Academy". Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  21. ^ "Twenhofel Middle School". Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  22. ^ "White's Tower Elementary School". Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  23. ^ "independencefire". independencekyfire.org. Retrieved April 13, 2017.