McLean County
McLean County Courthouse in Calhoun
McLean County Courthouse in Calhoun
Map of Kentucky highlighting McLean County
Location within the U.S. state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°32′N 87°16′W / 37.53°N 87.26°W / 37.53; -87.26
Country United States
State Kentucky
Founded1854
Named forAlney McLean
SeatCalhoun
Largest cityLivermore
Area
 • Total256 sq mi (660 km2)
 • Land252 sq mi (650 km2)
 • Water3.8 sq mi (10 km2)  1.5%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total9,152 Decrease
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitewww.mcleancounty.ky.gov

McLean County (/məˈkln/) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,531.[1] Its county seat is Calhoun.[2] McLean is a prohibition or dry county. McLean County is part of the Owensboro, KY Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of some 114,752 (2010 census).

History

McLean County was formed by act of the Kentucky legislature on February 6, 1854, from portions of surrounding Daviess, Ohio, and Muhlenberg Counties. The county was named for Judge Alney McLean, founder of Greenville, the county seat of Muhlenberg County.[3][4]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 256 square miles (660 km2), of which 252 square miles (650 km2) is land and 3.8 square miles (9.8 km2) (1.5%) is water.[5]

Features

McLean County is part of the Western Coal Fields region of Kentucky.

The county is transected southeast to northwest by Green River, the longest river entirely within the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Bridge crossings of Green River are at Calhoun, Livermore, east of Island, and west of Beech Grove. Green River is navigable throughout McLean County, with Army Corps of Engineers Lock and Dam #2 at Calhoun assisting boat navigation.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18606,144
18707,61423.9%
18809,29322.1%
18909,8876.4%
190012,44825.9%
191013,2416.4%
192012,502−5.6%
193011,072−11.4%
194011,4463.4%
195010,021−12.4%
19609,355−6.6%
19709,062−3.1%
198010,09011.3%
19909,628−4.6%
20009,9383.2%
20109,531−4.1%
20209,152−4.0%
2021 (est.)9,100−0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2021[1]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 9,938 people, 3,984 households, and 2,880 families residing in the county. The population density was 39 per square mile (15/km2). There were 4,392 housing units at an average density of 17 per square mile (6.6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 98.58% White, 0.36% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.04% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.31% from other races, and 0.53% from two or more races. 0.84% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,984 households, out of which 32.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.00% were married couples living together, 8.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.70% were non-families. 24.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.20% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 14.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,675, and the median income for a family was $35,322. Males had a median income of $28,446 versus $19,432 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,046. About 13.70% of families and 16.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.10% of those under age 18 and 18.50% of those age 65 or over.

Education

McLean County has a county-wide public school district of some 1,700 students with one high school, one middle school and three elementary schools.

McLean County High School has approximately 500 students. Its first graduating class was 1973. McLean County Middle School has roughly 350 students. In the 2006–2007 school year, McLean County Middle School ranked third in final year testing and second in public schools to Hancock County. Both schools are located just east of Calhoun on Highway 136 and have the cougar as mascots.

Additionally, the county school system has three grade K-5 elementary schools in the towns of Calhoun, Livermore and Sacramento. Elementary schools in the towns of Beech Grove and Island were closed years ago. The Calhoun and Livermore elementaries have about 300 students each, while Sacramento Elementary has 125 students. Calhoun Elementary School's mascot is the bulldog, Livermore Elementary School's mascot is the yellow jacket, Sacramento Elementary School's mascot is the blue jay, Island Elementary School's mascot was the eagle, and Beech Grove Elementary School's mascot was the gorilla. Sacramento's future was at stake at one time, but the school was renamed as Marie Gatton Phillips Elementary School and remains active.

At any time, between 350 and 400 county residents are enrolled in higher education of some form.

Media

McLean County is served by a weekly newspaper, the McLean County News.

Communities

Cities

Census-designated place

Other unincorporated communities

North McLean

South McLean

Politics

United States presidential election results for McLean County, Kentucky[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 3,633 75.97% 1,074 22.46% 75 1.57%
2016 3,381 74.05% 988 21.64% 197 4.31%
2012 2,705 64.40% 1,432 34.10% 63 1.50%
2008 2,386 53.96% 1,963 44.39% 73 1.65%
2004 2,584 58.26% 1,823 41.10% 28 0.63%
2000 2,219 55.17% 1,747 43.44% 56 1.39%
1996 1,368 38.05% 1,834 51.02% 393 10.93%
1992 1,355 32.82% 2,223 53.84% 551 13.34%
1988 1,829 44.49% 2,269 55.19% 13 0.32%
1984 1,942 50.03% 1,917 49.38% 23 0.59%
1980 1,497 40.35% 2,147 57.87% 66 1.78%
1976 1,212 33.73% 2,346 65.29% 35 0.97%
1972 2,298 65.10% 1,191 33.74% 41 1.16%
1968 1,372 35.73% 1,373 35.76% 1,095 28.52%
1964 1,173 31.24% 2,576 68.60% 6 0.16%
1960 2,269 56.94% 1,716 43.06% 0 0.00%
1956 1,886 48.73% 1,965 50.78% 19 0.49%
1952 1,791 47.60% 1,961 52.11% 11 0.29%
1948 1,112 33.41% 2,104 63.22% 112 3.37%
1944 1,752 43.83% 2,222 55.59% 23 0.58%
1940 1,698 38.44% 2,709 61.33% 10 0.23%
1936 1,338 34.49% 2,496 64.35% 45 1.16%
1932 1,412 33.43% 2,771 65.60% 41 0.97%
1928 2,408 58.07% 1,728 41.67% 11 0.27%
1924 1,857 43.61% 2,284 53.64% 117 2.75%
1920 2,408 46.12% 2,754 52.75% 59 1.13%
1916 1,439 46.52% 1,589 51.37% 65 2.10%
1912 822 31.40% 1,304 49.81% 492 18.79%


See also

Coordinates: 37°32′N 87°16′W / 37.53°N 87.26°W / 37.53; -87.26

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved March 6, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 1. Kentucky State Historical Society. 1903. pp. 36.
  4. ^ Collins, Lewis (1877). History of Kentucky. p. 596.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  11. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 4, 2018.