The U.S. State of Kentucky is currently home to two professional soccer teams: Louisville City FC, which plays in the USL Championship, and Racing Louisville FC, which plays in the NWSL. Kentucky has had professional sports teams in its past, such as the Louisville Brecks/Colonels of the NFL in the early 1920s.

High school sports

See also: List of Kentucky "Mr. Basketball" award winners

Despite the national stereotype that Kentucky is a diehard basketball state, at the high school level the state produces many times over more top nationally ranked football players than basketball. In the past ten years the state has produced many players ranked among the top 20 in their position, notably Tim Couch, Jacob Tamme, Chris Redman, Dennis Johnson, Eric Shelton, Michael Bush, Brian Brohm, Mario Urrutia, Earl Heyman, André Woodson, Micah Johnson, and DeVante Parker. An increasingly growing number of top baseball talent is also coming from Kentucky, such as Brandon Webb, Austin Kearns, Jo Adell, and Paul Byrd.

Louisville has had practically a monopoly on the state's top players since their recent success on the national stage. The football Cardinals have historically depended on the states of Florida and Georgia for a majority of their talent, and currently over 65% of the team's starters are from those two states.

As of 2012, there were six high school rugby teams in Kentucky.[1]

College sports

Despite a recent surge in the quality of the University of Louisville football team, and all UofL sports during the "year of the cardinal" or "Louisville slam", college basketball remains the sport of choice in most of Kentucky. Western Kentucky University's men's basketball program is one of the ten most winning in the history of the NCAA, and has one Final Four appearance (1971). Murray State University is a perennial threat to win the Ohio Valley Conference and appear in the NCAA Tournament, having done so 13 times. However, the question in Kentucky college athletics is most often "Red or Blue?" referring to the primary colors of its two flagship universities – the University of Kentucky (blue) and the University of Louisville (red).

In recent years, the Louisville Cardinals have further proven themselves, not only as one of the state's best organized college athletic programs, but elite on the national stage. The University of Louisville Cardinals are consistently the most profitable college sports franchise in the nation, ranking first in Kentucky with a basketball revenue of $42,434,684 during the 2012 fiscal year. Kentucky came in at 5th on the list making $21,598,681.[2] The Cardinals' program has been deemed to have the most equitable fanbase of any school in the country, according to a study conducted by Emory Sports Marketing Analytics.[3] The University of Kentucky is ranked 7th on the list.

The Battle for the Bluegrass

See also: Kentucky Wildcats and Louisville Cardinals

The rivalry between the North Carolina Tar Heels and the Duke Blue Devils is perhaps the only in-state basketball rivalry that compares on a national scale to the rivalry between the Kentucky Wildcats and Louisville Cardinals.

A 2006 Lexington Herald-Leader article stated that interest in UofL sports is surging across the state of Kentucky, especially in Hopkinsville and Owensboro.[4] An October 21, 2006 Louisville Courier-Journal article also stated that the total sales of UofL merchandise has tripled since 2001 and that the school now ranks 32nd nationally in sales, up from 41st in 2001. UofL ranks 2nd in the Big East Conference and the 3rd highest among all urban universities (to Southern California and Miami) in merchandise sales. UK's merchandise sales have steadily remained around 14th in the nation, by far the best in the state. UofL now has more registered collegiate license plates than the University of Kentucky (18,300 to 17,000); a fourfold increase since 2004. In 1995 UK had a 15,000 plate lead on UofL.[5] It is also important to note that in the last few years the Louisville Cardinals have been the most profitable college sports franchise in the nation and have been deemed to have the most equitable fanbase of any school in the country according to a few studies.

Fuel was added to the fire of this rivalry when Rick Pitino, the UK coach who led the Wildcats to their 1996 National Title before leaving to become coach of the NBA's Boston Celtics, returned to the Bluegrass State to coach the Cardinals in 2001. Many in the state compared the move to the treachery of Benedict Arnold. The situation was exacerbated by the transfer of underachieving Wildcat power forward/center Marvin Stone. Stone's best season with the Cats was his sophomore season, when the former McDonald's All-American averaged 6.0 points and 4.6 rebounds per game.[6] Under Pitino, however, Stone averaged 10.7 points and 7.3 rebounds for the Cards, including a 16-point, 7-rebound, 2-block performance against the Wildcats in an 81–63 Louisville win on December 28.[7]

College basketball

Battle4bluegrass.GIF

Basketball is the iconic sport in Kentucky today. However, the first organized team on campus is the women's basketball team. Because after the establishment of the sports department, girls often carry out sports activities in response, and female physical educators also take action quickly. Provide professional assistance to any student run sports club. In the past, the relationship between basketball and the Department of physical education was very bad. Florence Stout, director of women's physical education, tried to make this sport a very limited part of her whole teaching plan. There has been no similar project for female students for nearly 20 years. It was not until the end of 1901 that the school council voted to establish a sports department with both men and women.

The origin of basketball is very humble. It took almost 20 years to establish itself as a viable sport and the main element of school.[8] Basketball was invented in 1891. Its origin is similar to college football. Charles Eliota repeatedly called for the end of football and basketball when he was president of Harvard. And football, like basketball, is short of resources and often can't buy the necessary equipment. The famous coach Adolph Rupp held many positions in the University before basketball was slowly proved. It was many years later that the sports department let him focus on basketball training.[8] Gradually, the basketball team developed from a trivial sport to a strong passion.

The modern series, which began in 1983, was started with a win by the Louisville Cardinals. However, in recent years the Kentucky Wildcats have dominated the series, winning 5 of the last 7 meetings. At least three college coaching legends have been associated with programs in the state of Kentucky: Adolph Rupp (UK), Denny Crum (UofL), and Rick Pitino (both UK and UofL). Also, several successful NBA players played in the state, including Pat Riley, Wes Unseld, and Dan Issel. Only the UCLA Bruins have won more NCAA championships than the Kentucky Wildcats, with the Wildcats ranking first in almost every other significant measure of a successful program. In addition to UK and UofL, the Western Kentucky Hilltoppers are also a historically successful basketball program.

In 2011, the University of Pikeville won the NAIA Men's Basketball National Championship, followed only days later by Bellarmine University, who won the 2011 NCAA Men's Basketball Division II National Championship in Springfield, Massachusetts. Both teams began their 2011-2012 seasons ranked #1 in the nation in their respective leagues.

Team Kentucky Wildcats Louisville Cardinals Western Kentucky Hilltoppers
All-time win–loss record (rank) 2,021-637 (1st) 1,726-874 (12th) 1,622–720 (14th)
All-time winning percentage (rank) 76.0% (1st) 66.1% (8th) 66.5% (7th)
NCAA Tourney appearances 55 (1st) 41 (5th) 21
NCAA Tourney wins (rank) 121 (1st) 75 (6th) 18
NCAA Final Fours 17 (T-2nd) 10 (T-5th) 1
NCAA titles 8 (2nd) 3 (6th) 0

Eras of dominance

The impressive history of college basketball in Kentucky has been punctuated by a few notable eras of dominance by the two flagship schools.

UK: Rupp's early years

Under Adolph Rupp, the Kentucky Wildcats were the most dominant team in the early history of the NCAA Tournament. From 1942 to 1958 the Wildcats won four NCAA titles (1948, 1949, 1951, 1958). They also won the 1942 National Invitation Tournament.

UofL: The Team of the 1980s

The Louisville Cardinals were dubbed "The Team of the 1980s", winning two national titles during that decade (1980 and 1986). (Only the Indiana Hoosiers equaled this number during the 1980s.) Under coach Denny Crum, UofL was the only team to go to four Final Fours during the decade, and had more wins than any other team over that span. Darrell Griffith won the John Wooden Award in 1980 and in 1986 "Never Nervous" Pervis Ellison became the first freshman to ever be named NCAA Final Four MVP, a feat equaled only by Syracuse's Carmelo Anthony.

UK: The Team of the 1990s

The Kentucky Wildcats were the most dominant team of the 1990s, winning two national titles (1996 and 1998), with three straight trips to the NCAA Championship game and four total trips to the Final Four. UK's 1996 National Championship team is considered to be the best NCAA team of all time, as evidenced by the nine players on the roster who played in the NBA.[9]

Basketball and race

Apartheid also existed in sports for a long time. From the first season in 1930 to his retirement in 1972, Adolph Rupp signed only one black player throughout his career in Kentucky. It was not until the 1960s that African American athletes began to be recruited in most regions. Even in the south, where apartheid lasted longer, schools such as Louisville and North Carolina signed their first black players in the early 1960s.

College football

College football started late in Kentucky. Sports scientist Ronald Smith pointed out that as early as the 1850s, football originated from the bullying and entrance ceremony of Freshmen in some schools in the eastern United States.[10] Teachers at famous universities such as Harvard and Yale were so shocked that they voted to ban the ceremony. The sport was born in the late 19th century. In 1924, the University of Kentucky's school newspaper:Kerrnell, reported that a group of students from the University of Transylvania had football they had seen for the first time in the blue grass area. In 1880, with the efforts of this group of college students, they ordered a football and a rule book and organized an internal game. And in the following ten years, people knew little about these competitions, and sports "had no special management". The first student sports association was established in 1892. Although the team ushered in the first winning season in 1893, it was plagued by various financial problems in the following decades. In the same year, the school council was disturbed by the informal status of sports on the University playground and the violence of football. Raised objections to the existence of the team. In 1900, it was the only team to beat the powerful Louisville sports club. But with success, more and more accusations came out of thin air that a team in Lexington hired professional players to play at festivals. Then, in view of these dark statements, football became a valuable symbol of masculinity in America's best universities. As Buck became president, the uncertain status of college sports has changed. He said that football is a symbol of good qualities such as courage and perseverance.

UofL has recently dominated the football rivalry, winning 70% of the games in the Modern Series which began in 1994. UK leads the all-time series, 10–8.
UofL has recently dominated the football rivalry, winning 70% of the games in the Modern Series which began in 1994. UK leads the all-time series, 10–8.

For all their success in basketball, the Kentucky Wildcats have been unable to remain consistently competitive in football. The last two Kentucky football seasons have resulted in an embarrassing 2-10 record. Playing in the brutally competitive Southeastern Conference, the Wildcats won an SEC title in 1950 under legendary coach Paul "Bear" Bryant and shared SEC titles in 1976 and 1977 under Fran Curci. Bryant left the school in 1953; some attribute the move to a conclusion that the football program's popularity would always remain a distant second to the basketball program, at that time coached by Adolph Rupp, a legend in his own right.

UofL hired legendary coach Howard Schnellenberger in 1984. The team has continued to rise under coaches John L. Smith, Bobby Petrino, and Charlie Strong. On November 2, 2006, the 5th-ranked UofL football team defeated the 3rd-ranked West Virginia Mountaineers in what was dubbed "The Dream Game", the second time in Big East history that two top-5 teams had ever met. The game was ranked as the most-viewed ESPN Thursday night football game ever.[11] The game marked a new high in a program that had been on the rise for several years.

Only one week later the Cardinals were defeated by a third undefeated Big East team, the upstart and 15th-ranked Rutgers Scarlet Knights, in what was billed as the biggest college football game in the New York City Metro Area in 60 years; with the Empire State Building even being lit with the Rutgers team colors. The game was also one of the highest rated ESPN Thursday Night games ever as a record crowd in Piscataway, New Jersey stormed the field in celebration. The loss ended the Cardinals' national title hopes, but the team did receive a bid to the FedEx Orange Bowl. On January 2 the Cardinals defeated Wake Forest 24–13[12] in the Orange Bowl to claim the team's first BCS Bowl win.

More recently, the state has been at the forefront of coaching integration in Division I FBS football. Following the 2009 season, all three of the state's FBS programs filled their coaching vacancies with African Americans. The first to do so was Western Kentucky, who hired Willie Taggart to replace the fired David Elson. Louisville followed suit by hiring Charlie Strong to replace the fired Steve Kragthorpe. Finally, Joker Phillips, who had been the designated successor to Rich Brooks at Kentucky, took over after the latter announced his retirement. The first African American head coach at any of the Division I football programs in Kentucky was Ron Cooper, who coached at Louisville between 1995 and 1997.

The Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) Eastern Kentucky Colonels have held a long tradition of football success. Until the 2009-2010 season, the Colonels were tied with Florida State University for the most consecutive winning seasons (32). In that season, EKU finished 5-6. Eastern returned to the FCS Playoffs in the 2011 season, in which it lost to #17 James Madison 20-17 in the opening round. The Colonels have won 20 Ohio Valley Conference (OVC) titles and two FCS (formerly I-AA) National Championships, in 1979 and 1982. Much of Eastern Kentucky's success came during the long tenure of head coach Roy Kidd, who led the team from 1964 through 2002. The program has continued its success under more recent coaches Danny Hope and Dean Hood.

List of NAIA teams

School Nickname Conference
Alice Lloyd College Eagles River States Conference
Asbury University Eagles River States Conference
Brescia University Bearcats River States Conference
Campbellsville University Tigers Mid-South Conference
University of the Cumberlands Patriots Mid-South Conference
Georgetown College Tigers Mid-South Conference
Lindsey Wilson College Blue Raiders Mid-South Conference
Midway University Eagles River States Conference
University of Pikeville Bears/Lady Bears Mid-South Conference
Thomas More University Saints Mid-South Conference[a]
Union College Bulldogs Mid-South Conference
  1. ^ Thomas More joined the NCAA Division II Great Midwest Athletic Conference in July 2022, but is maintaining dual membership in the NCAA and NAIA in the 2022–23 school year, continuing to compete in the NAIA, before aligning completely with the NCAA in July 2023.

NJCAA

School Nickname Division
Elizabethtown Community and Technical College Barons III
Simmons College of Kentucky Panthers I

Professional sports teams

Professional football, baseball and basketball all at one time had teams in Kentucky. The National Football League and National League had early franchises in Louisville, and the Kentucky Colonels were a mainstay of the American Basketball Association that joined the National Basketball Association with the ABA-NBA merger in 1976; the Colonels were one of only two ABA teams that were kept out of the merger (the other was the Spirits of St. Louis).

In 2004, the New ABA added a Louisville-based team called the Kentucky Colonels, which was replaced by a team in Murray, Kentucky in 2007.[13] That team was originally also named the Kentucky Colonels, but the name was changed to the Kentucky Retros in March 2007 in deference to the tradition of the Louisville-based teams.[14] The team eventually announced that they would relocate to Louisville.[15] The team folded during the 2007-08 season. Pikeville, Kentucky was also home to pro basketball in the 2007–2008 season, with the East Kentucky Miners joining the Continental Basketball Association.[16] But they met the same fate and folded sometime between 2009 and 2010.

The state's first top-level professional team since the demise of the Colonels is Racing Louisville FC, an expansion team in the National Women's Soccer League that began play in 2021. The NWSL team is owned by Louisville City FC, which has played in the second-level men's league now known as the USL Championship (USLC) since 2015.

The state is home to several minor league sports teams:

Sports in Kentucky is located in Kentucky
Minor League Baseball in Kentucky

Minor league baseball

Football

Semi-pro football

Women's football

Basketball

Soccer

Rugby

Women's Rugby

Former professional/semi-pro teams

Motorsport

Indianapolis 500 winner Danny Sullivan was born in Louisville. Kentucky Motor Speedway opened in 1960 and was the home track of Owensboro natives Darrell Waltrip, Michael Waltrip and Jeremy Mayfield. MotoGP world champion Nicky Hayden and his brothers Tommy Hayden and Roger Lee Hayden were also born in Owensboro.

Louisville Motor Speedway hosted NASCAR Truck Series races from 1995 to 1999. Kentucky Speedway opened in 2000 to host IndyCar Series, NASCAR Truck Series, NASCAR Xfinity Series, and later NASCAR Cup Series races.

Horse racing

Churchill Downs opened in 1875 and is home of the Kentucky Derby, part of the American Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing. The venue has also hosted several editions of the Breeders' Cup.

Keeneland opened in 1936 and hosts the Blue Grass Stakes and Shadwell Turf Mile Stakes. Other Thoroughbred racetracks include Kentucky Downs, Ellis Park and Turfway Park. In addition, The Red Mile is one of the major harness racing venues in the country, hosting the Kentucky Futurity.

Venues

This list is incomplete; you can help by adding missing items. (November 2019)

Venues with a minimum capacity of 5,000 are listed here.

Venue City Capacity Type Tenant(s) Opened
Kentucky Speedway Sparta 86,000 Motorsports No races; previously Quaker State 400 1998
Kroger Field Lexington 61,000 Football Kentucky Wildcats 1973
Cardinal Stadium Louisville 60,800 Football Louisville Cardinals 1998
Churchill Downs Louisville 50,000 Horse Racing Multiple races, most notably Kentucky Derby and Kentucky Oaks 1875[a]
Houchens Industries–L. T. Smith Stadium Bowling Green 22,113 Football Western Kentucky Hilltoppers 1968
KFC Yum! Center Louisville 22,090 Basketball Louisville Cardinals 2010
Rupp Arena Lexington 20,545 Basketball Kentucky Wildcats 1976
Roy Kidd Stadium Richmond 20,000 Football Eastern Kentucky Colonels 1969
Freedom Hall Louisville 18,252 Multi-purpose Bellarmine Knights 1956
Roy Stewart Stadium Murray 16,800 Football Murray State Racers 1973
Louisville Slugger Field Louisville 13,131 Baseball Louisville Bats 2000
Lynn Family Stadium Louisville 11,700[b] Soccer Louisville City FC, Racing Louisville FC 2020
Manual Memorial Stadium Louisville 11,463[50] Football (high school) Manual Crimsons 1954[c]
Jayne Stadium Morehead 10,000 Football, soccer Morehead State Eagles 1964
Truist Arena Highland Heights 9,400 Basketball Northern Kentucky Norse 2008
CFSB Center Murray 8,825 Basketball Murray State Racers 1998
Keeneland Lexington 8,799 Horse Racing Multiple races 1936
McRight Field Paducah 8,500[51] Football (high school) Paducah Tilghman Blue Tornado 1956
Memorial Coliseum Lexington 8,500 Basketball Kentucky Wildcats 1950
T. T. Knight Stadium Louisville 8,500[52] Football (high school) Southern Trojans
Maxwell Field Louisville 8,000[53] Football (high school) Male Bulldogs
Reid Stadium Owensboro 7,500[54] Football (high school) Daviess County Panthers 2019
E. A. Diddle Arena Bowling Green 7,326 Basketball Western Kentucky Hilltoppers and Lady Toppers 1963
Clark Field Somerset 7,000[55] Football (high school) Somerset Briar Jumpers
Wild Health Field Lexington 6,994[d] Baseball Lexington Legends, Wild Health Genomes 2001
Broadbent Arena Louisville 6,600 Multi-purpose 1956
Alumni Coliseum Richmond 6,500 Basketball Eastern Kentucky Colonels 1963
Eastern Field Middletown[e] 6,500[56] Football (high school) Eastern Eagles
Ellis Johnson Arena Morehead 6,500 Basketball Morehead State Eagles 1981
St. Xavier Stadium Louisville 6,200[57] Football (high school) St. Xavier Tigers
Harrison County Athletic Complex Cynthiana 6,000[58] Football (high school) Harrison County Thorobreds
Louisville Gardens Louisville 6,000 Multi-purpose 1905
Reed Conder Memorial Gymnasium Draffenville[f] 6,000[59] Basketball (high school) Marshall County Marshals
Viking Stadium Morehead 6,000[60] Football (high school) Rowan County Vikings
Appalachian Wireless Arena Pikeville 5,700[g] Basketball Pikeville Bears 2005
Alltech Arena Lexington 5,517 Equestrianism 2009
El Donaldson Stadium Bowling Green 5,500[61] Football (high school) Bowling Green Purples
Putnam Stadium Ashland 5,500[62] Football (high school) Ashland Tomcats
Racer Arena Murray 5,500 Volleyball[h] Murray State Racers 1954
Shawnee Alumni Stadium Louisville 5,500[63] Football (high school) Shawnee Golden Eagles
Mason County Fieldhouse Maysville 5,400[64] Basketball (high school) Mason County Royals
Roy L. Winchester Gymnasium New Castle 5,400[65] Basketball (high school) Henry County Wildcats
Dr. Mark & Cindy Lynn Stadium Louisville 5,300 Soccer Louisville Cardinals 2014
Eagles' Nest Mayfield 5,200[66] Basketball (high school) Graves County Eagles
Alumni Field Frankfort 5,000 Football Kentucky State Thorobreds
Badgett Athletic Complex Madisonville 5,000[67] Football (high school) Madisonville–North Hopkins Maroons
Baker Field Morganfield 5,000[68] Football (high school) Union County Braves
Boyd County Middle School Gymnasium Summit[i] 5,000[69] Basketball (high school) Boyd County Lions (HS)
Bradner Stadium Middlesboro 5,000[70] Football (high school) Middlesboro Yellowjackets
Colonel Stadium Henderson 5,000[71] Football (high school) Henderson County Colonels
Cunningham Stadium Mount Sterling 5,000[72] Football (high school) Montgomery County Indians
Davis Memorial Stadium Rosspoint[j] 5,000[73] Football (high school) Harlan County Black Bears
Dr. Robert J. Bell Stadium Lexington 5,000[74] Football (high school) Henry Clay Blue Devils
Fryar Stadium Fort Campbell[k] 5,000[75] Football (high school) Fort Campbell Falcons[l]
Henry R. Evans/Ivan McGlone Stadium Flatwoods[m] 5,000[76] Football (high school) Russell Red Devils
Jack D. Rose Stadium Murray 5,000[77] Football (high school) Calloway County Lakers
Jon R. Akers Stadium Lexington 5,000[78] Football (high school) Paul Laurence Dunbar Bulldogs
Lions Stadium Cannonsburg[n] 5,000[69] Football (high school) Boyd County Lions
Morton Combs Athletic Complex Hindman 5,000[79] Basketball (high school) Knott County Central Patriots
Owensboro Sportscenter Owensboro 5,000 Basketball Kentucky Wesleyan Panthers, Owensboro Thoroughbreds, Owensboro Catholic Aces (HS) 1949
Pat Crawford Stadium Louisville 5,000[80] Football (high school) Ballard Bruins
Pike Central Stadium Pikeville[o] 5,000[81] Football (high school) Pike County Central Hawks
Preston Young Complex Louisville 5,000[82] Football (high school) Western Warriors
Pulaski County High School Gym Somerset 5,000[83] Basketball (high school) Pulaski County Maroons
Stadium of Champions Hopkinsville 5,000[84][p] Football (high school) Christian County Colonels, Hopkinsville Tigers[85]
Toyota Stadium Georgetown 5,000 Football Georgetown Tigers 1997
War Memorial Stadium Mayfield 5,000[86] Football (high school) Mayfield Cardinals
  1. ^ Date of track opening. The current grandstands were first built in 1895, and have been expanded and renovated many times since.
  2. ^ Fixed capacity; 15,304 with standing room.
  3. ^ On-site replacement of a 1924 stadium of the same name.
  4. ^ Fixed capacity; various picnic and grass seating areas bring the full capacity to over 9,000.
  5. ^ Preferred mailing address is Louisville. Middletown is one of the 83 cities that retained their city limits following the 2003 merger of the governments of Louisville and surrounding Jefferson County.
  6. ^ Physically located in Draffenville; mailing address in Benton.
  7. ^ Fixed capacity; concert capacity is up to 7,000.
  8. ^ Originally a basketball arena; reconfigured as volleyball-specific after the opening of CFSB Center.
  9. ^ Physically located in Summit; mailing address in Ashland.
  10. ^ Physically located in Rosspoint; mailing address in Baxter.
  11. ^ Physically located on the Tennessee side of the Fort Campbell Army post; all mailing addresses on the post are in Kentucky.
  12. ^ Although Fort Campbell High School physically lies in Tennessee, it is a member of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association, presumably because the U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity administers schools on Fort Campbell and Fort Knox (the latter entirely within Kentucky) as parts of a single district.
  13. ^ The playing field is bisected by the Flatwoods/Russell city boundary, with the main grandstand in Flatwoods. The mailing address is in Russell.
  14. ^ Physically located in Cannonsburg; mailing address in Ashland.
  15. ^ Physically located in an unincorporated area of Pike County with a Pikeville mailing address.
  16. ^ The KHSAA lists both Christian County and Hopkinsville High Schools as tenants of the Stadium of Champions, but the two schools' entries disagree on the capacity. The Christian County entry gives 5,000 and the Hopkinsville entry 15,000. It is more likely that the Hopkinsville entry is in error.

See also

References

  1. ^ The Courier-Journal, Louisville rugby | Cards have 14 players in the 2012 recruiting class, 3 September 2012, http://www.courier-journal.com/article/B2/20120903/SPORTS02/309030065/Louisville-rugby-Cards-14-players-2012-recruiting-class
  2. ^ "Highest Grossing Football and Basketball Programs". November 14, 2013.
  3. ^ "Study says Louisville has college basketball's best fanbase; Kentucky 7th". May 29, 2013.
  4. ^ Where is everybody? – Lexington Herald-Leader
  5. ^ Racking up sales – The Courier-Journal
  6. ^ NBA.com Prospect Profile – Marvin Stone
  7. ^ CNNSI.com Player Profile – Marvin Stone
  8. ^ a b James Duane, Bolin (2019). Adolph Rupp and the Rise of Kentucky Basketball. University Press of Kentucky.
  9. ^ Another future NBA player, Scott Padgett, was attending UK at the time, but was academically ineligible for the 1995–96 season.
  10. ^ Stanley, Gregory (January 1, 1996). "Before Big Blue: Sports at the University of Kentucky, 1880-1940". Sports Studies.
  11. ^ West Virginia-Louisville Ranks as Most-Viewed ESPN Thursday Night Football Game Ever[permanent dead link]
  12. ^ Louisville defeats Wake Forrest 24–13 in the Orange Bowl Archived April 18, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  13. ^ "American Basketball Association team looks to bring new energy to Murray". The Murray State News. January 19, 2007. Archived from the original on March 15, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2007.
  14. ^ "Kentucky team announces name change". American Basketball Association. March 14, 2007. Archived from the original on September 30, 2007. Retrieved March 16, 2007.
  15. ^ ABAlive.com – Home of the American Basketball Association
  16. ^ Appalachian News Express[permanent dead link]
  17. ^ a b c "Mens Outdoor". idflnation.com. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  18. ^ "The Kentucky Spartans". www.facebook.com. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  19. ^ "Western Kentucky Thoroughbreds Semi Pro Football". www.facebook.com. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  20. ^ "Kentuckiana Kurse Indoor Football Team". www.facebook.com. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  21. ^ "Mens Indoor". idflnation.com. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  22. ^ Dynamite, Derby City. "Welcome to The Derby City". Derby City Dynamite. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  23. ^ "Louisville City FC". www.louisvillecityfc.com. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  24. ^ "Professional Soccer is Coming to Lexington". Lexington Pro Soccer. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  25. ^ USLLeagueOne com Staff (October 5, 2021). "United Soccer League Welcomes Lexington Pro Soccer as League One Expansion Club". USL League One. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  26. ^ "Metro Louisville FC". www.facebook.com. Retrieved May 19, 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  27. ^ "Metro Louisville FC". Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  28. ^ jrue. "Home". Retrieved December 8, 2019.
  29. ^ Tsamas, Cary (November 25, 2019). "Lexington Landsharks - The New Competitive Adult Team". Soccer in the Bluegrass. Retrieved December 8, 2019.
  30. ^ "Lexington Landsharks". Facebook. Retrieved May 19, 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  31. ^ "Racing Louisville Football Club - NWSL". www.racingloufc.com. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  32. ^ "Lexington Blackstones RFC". Lexington Blackstones RFC. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  33. ^ "Lexington Blackstones RFC". www.facebook.com. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  34. ^ "Midwest Men's Division III". USA Rugby. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  35. ^ "Louisville R.F.C - D3 Mens". sites.google.com. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  36. ^ "Louisville Rugby Football Club". www.facebook.com. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  37. ^ "Lexington Rugby | Lexington Black Widows Women's Rugby Club". blackwidows. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  38. ^ "Lexington Black Widows RFC". www.facebook.com. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  39. ^ "Louisville Women's Rugby Club". sites.google.com. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  40. ^ "Louisville Women's Rugby Football Club". www.facebook.com. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  41. ^ "Midwest Women's Division II". USA Rugby. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  42. ^ "Louisville Xtreme - Official Website". Louisville Xtreme. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  43. ^ "Northern Kentucky Bulldogs". Archived from the original on April 19, 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2013.
  44. ^ "GDFL Announces Addition of Kentucky Thoroughbreds - Gridiron Developmental Football League". www.gdfl.org. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  45. ^ "Western Kentucky Thoroughbreds Semi Pro Football". www.facebook.com. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  46. ^ "Lexington Red Dragons Enter GDFL - Gridiron Developmental Football League". www.gdfl.org. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  47. ^ "Kentucky Trojans Home Page". HomeTeamsONLINE. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  48. ^ "USA Semi Pro Football Rankings". www.facebook.com. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  49. ^ "Kentuckiana Cavalry Amateur Football Team". www.facebook.com. Retrieved October 27, 2019.
  50. ^ "DuPont Manual High School Directory Entry - (# 76)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  51. ^ "Paducah Tilghman High School Directory Entry - (# 213)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  52. ^ "Southern High School Directory Entry - (# 250)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  53. ^ "Male High School Directory Entry - (# 171)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  54. ^ "Daviess County High School Directory Entry - (# 66)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  55. ^ "Somerset High School Directory Entry - (# 248)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  56. ^ "Eastern High School Directory Entry - (# 79)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  57. ^ "St. Xavier High School Directory Entry - (# 259)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  58. ^ "Harrison County High School Directory Entry - (# 116)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  59. ^ "Marshall County High School Directory Entry - (# 173)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  60. ^ "Rowan County High School Directory Entry - (# 234)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  61. ^ "Bowling Green High School Directory Entry - (# 266)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  62. ^ "Ashland Blazer High School Directory Entry - (# 216)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  63. ^ "Shawnee Blazer High School Directory Entry - (# 243)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  64. ^ "Mason County High School Directory Entry - (# 174)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  65. ^ "Henry County High School Directory Entry - (# 123)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  66. ^ "Graves County High School Directory Entry - (# 109)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  67. ^ "Madisonville-North Hopkins High School Directory Entry - (# 169)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  68. ^ "Union County High School Directory Entry - (# 268)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  69. ^ a b "Boyd County High School Directory Entry - (# 27)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  70. ^ "Middlesboro High School Directory Entry - (# 185)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  71. ^ "Henderson County High School Directory Entry - (# 121)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  72. ^ "Montgomery County High School Directory Entry - (# 190)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  73. ^ "Harlan County High School Directory Entry - (# 329)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  74. ^ "Henry Clay High School Directory Entry - (# 122)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  75. ^ "Fort Campbell High School Directory Entry - (# 95)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  76. ^ "Russell High School Directory Entry - (# 235)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  77. ^ "Calloway County High School Directory Entry - (# 42)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  78. ^ "Paul Laurence Dunbar High School Directory Entry - (# 299)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  79. ^ "Knott County Central High School Directory Entry - (# 145)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  80. ^ "Ballard High School Directory Entry - (# 9)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  81. ^ "Pike County Central High School Directory Entry - (# 309)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  82. ^ "Western High School Directory Entry - (# 284)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  83. ^ "Pulaski County High School Directory Entry - (# 228)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  84. ^ "Christian County High School Directory Entry - (# 54)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  85. ^ "Hopkinsville High School Directory Entry - (# 131)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
  86. ^ "Mayfield High School Directory Entry - (# 175)". KHSAA Member School Directory. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved November 5, 2019.