This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages) This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. (October 2019) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) This article may need to be rewritten to comply with Wikipedia's quality standards. You can help. The talk page may contain suggestions. (November 2020) This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.Find sources: "Search and rescue dog" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (November 2020) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
Red Cross Collie, Italy, 1909.
Red Cross Collie, Italy, 1909.
Austro-Hungarian sanitary dog in WWI, 1914.
Austro-Hungarian sanitary dog in WWI, 1914.

A search-and-rescue dog is one trained to find missing people after a natural or man-made disaster. The dogs detect human scent[citation needed] and have been known to find people under water, under snow, and under collapsed buildings.[1]

A dog and handler search for survivors of the April 2015 Nepal earthquake.
A dog and handler search for survivors of the April 2015 Nepal earthquake.

Applications

Rescue dog waiting at actual disaster site (2014 Hiroshima landslides)
Rescue dog waiting at actual disaster site (2014 Hiroshima landslides)

A cadaver dog searches for human remains at a plane crash site in Greenland.
A cadaver dog searches for human remains at a plane crash site in Greenland.

A dog with aptitude for finding dead bodies or body parts, whether buried, hidden or submerged, may be called a "cadaver dog".[2] In Croatia such dogs have been used to find burial sites almost 3000 years old.[3] Police, death investigators and anthropologists may work closely with cadaver dogs and their handlers. [4]

Training

Riley at World Trade Center post 911
Riley at World Trade Center post 911

Training of a search dog is usually begun when the dog is still a puppy.[5]

Organizations

Numerous countries, cities and regions have search and rescue organizations using dog-and-handler teams that can be mobilized in an emergency or disaster. Here are a few organizations.

Notable dogs

See also

References

  1. ^ Lockett, Michael S. (November 4, 2019). "Keeping a nose out: SEADOGS takes guesswork out of searches". Juneau Empire.
  2. ^ Komar, D. (March 9, 1999). "The use of cadaver dogs in locating scattered, scavenged human remains: preliminary field test results". Journal of Forensic Sciences. 44 (2): 405–408. PMID 10097372 – via PubMed.
  3. ^ Dogs show a nose for archaeology by sniffing out 3,000 year old tombs The Guardian, 2019
  4. ^ Rebmann A., David E. (2000). Cadaver Dog Handbook. Taylor & Francis Group. ISBN 978-0-8493-1886-3.
  5. ^ "Training Dogs & Handlers". Canadian Search Dogs. Archived from the original on 1 May 2006. Retrieved 8 January 2021.
  6. ^ "Strong Partners". International Rescue Dog Organisation.
  7. ^ "Orión, el perro rescatista en la tragedia de Vargas (Orion, the rescue dog in the Vargas tragedy)" (in Spanish). December 11, 2014. Archived from the original on December 16, 2014.