In Sweden, a common system for weights and measures was introduced by law in 1665. Before that, there were a number of local variants. The system was slightly revised in 1735. In 1855, a decimal reform was instituted that defined a new Swedish inch as 110 Swedish foot (2.96 cm or 1.17 inches). Up to the middle of the 19th century, there was a law allowing the imposition of the death penalty for falsifying weights or measures. Sweden adopted the metric system in 1889, after a decision by the parliament in 1875 and a ten-year transition period from 1879.[1] Only the Swedish mile, mil, has been preserved, now measuring 10 kilometres (6.2 statute miles).

Old length units

The Swedish units of length included the following:

Old area units

Old volume units

unit relation to previous metric value Imperial Value
pot - 0.966 L 0.850 imp qt; 1.021 US qt
tunna 2 spann -
ankare - 39.26 L 34.54 imp qt; 41.49 US qt
ohm 155 pottor 149.73 L 131.74 imp qt; 158.22 US qt
storfamn - 3770 L (3.77 m³) 3,320 imp qt; 3,980 US qt (830 imp gal; 1,000 US gal or 133 cu ft)
kubikfamn - 5850 L (5.85 m³) 5,150 imp qt; 6,180 US qt (1,290 imp gal; 1,550 US gal or 207 cu ft)

Old weight units

unit relation to previous metric value Imperial Value
skeppspund 20 lispund 170.03 kg 374.852 lb
bismerpund 12 skålpund 5.101 kg. 11.246 lb
lispund 20 skålpund 8.502 kg 18.744 lb
skålpund 2 mark 0.42507 kg 0.937 lb
mark 50 ort 212.5 g 7.496 oz
ort 4.2508 g 65.6 gr

Nautical units still in use

unit relationship metric value Imperial Value
nautisk mil 1852 m 2,025 yd
distansminut 1852 m 2,025 yd
sjömil (modern) 1852 m 2,025 yd

Old monetary units

See also

References

  1. ^ "Riksdagens protokoll 1875:54". May 19, 1875. p. 58. Retrieved November 15, 2019.