Whitaker, Pennsylvania
Rankin Bridge
Location in Allegheny County and the U.S. state of Pennsylvania.
Location in Allegheny County and the U.S. state of Pennsylvania.
Coordinates: 40°23′58″N 79°53′12″W / 40.39944°N 79.88667°W / 40.39944; -79.88667Coordinates: 40°23′58″N 79°53′12″W / 40.39944°N 79.88667°W / 40.39944; -79.88667
CountryUnited States
StatePennsylvania
CountyAllegheny
Government
 • MayorDaniel R Lassige
 • Council PresidentMike Bogesdorfer
 • Council Vice PresidentDavid Funk
 • Borough SecretaryJean Warren
 • Police ChiefOzie Sparks
Area
 • Total0.33 sq mi (0.85 km2)
 • Land0.30 sq mi (0.77 km2)
 • Water0.03 sq mi (0.09 km2)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total1,271
 • Estimate 
(2019)[2]
1,235
 • Density4,172.30/sq mi (1,609.38/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP codes
15120
Area code(s)412
FIPS code42-84440
School DistrictWest Mifflin

Whitaker is a borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, United States, and is on the Monongahela River 3 miles (5 km) upriver from Pittsburgh. The population was 1,271 at the 2010 census.[3]

The borough is named for James Whitaker, a pioneer settler.[4] Whitaker was incorporated January 4, 1904, from part of the former Mifflin Township.

Geography

Whitaker is located at 40°23′58″N 79°53′12″W / 40.39944°N 79.88667°W / 40.39944; -79.88667 (40.399376, -79.886627).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 0.33 square miles (0.85 km2), of which 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.078 km2), or 11.76%, is water.[3]

Surrounding communities

Whitaker has two land borders, including Munhall to the northwest and West Mifflin to the south and east. Across the Monongahela River to the northeast are the boroughs of Braddock and Rankin, the latter with a direct connector via Rankin Bridge.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
19101,547
19201,88121.6%
19302,07210.2%
19402,2177.0%
19502,149−3.1%
19602,130−0.9%
19701,797−15.6%
19801,615−10.1%
19901,416−12.3%
20001,338−5.5%
20101,271−5.0%
2019 (est.)1,235[2]−2.8%
Sources:[6][7][8][9][10]

At the 2000 census there were 1,338 people in 560 households, including 384 families, in the borough. The population density was 4,427.0 people per square mile (1,722.0/km²). There were 620 housing units at an average density of 2,051.4 per square mile (797.9/km²). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.65% White, 5.01% African American, 0.60% from other races, and 0.75% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.52%.[6]

There were 560 households, 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 15.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.4% were non-families. 28.0% of households were made up of individuals, and 12.1% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.89.

The age distribution was 23.4% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 30.0% from 25 to 44, 23.2% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% 65 or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 101.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.1 males.

The median household income was $34,239 and the median family income was $39,250. Males had a median income of $29,152 versus $23,409 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $19,910. About 11.9% of families and 14.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.6% of those under age 18 and 10.2% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

Government and politics

Presidential Elections Results[11][12][13]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2020 46% (260) 54% (304) 1% (4)
2016 46% (248) 53% (281) 1% (6)
2012 35% (195) 64% (356) 1% (8)

References

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Race, Hispanic or Latino, Age, and Housing Occupancy: 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File (QT-PL), Whitaker borough, Pennsylvania". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 26, 2011.
  4. ^ Ackerman, Jan (May 10, 1984). "Town names carry bit of history". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. p. 6. Retrieved October 31, 2015.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  6. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  7. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Pennsylvania" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  8. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  9. ^ "Pennsylvania: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  10. ^ "Number and Distribution of Inhabitants:Pennsylvania-Tennessee" (PDF). Fifteenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau.
  11. ^ EL. "2012 Allegheny County election". Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Retrieved October 15, 2017.
  12. ^ EL. "2016 Pennsylvania general election..." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved October 15, 2017.
  13. ^ "Election Night Reporting". results.enr.clarityelections.com. Retrieved October 29, 2021.