1960 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 12 – October 13, 1960
Number of games154
Number of teams16
TV partner(s)NBC, CBS, ABC
Regular season
Season MVPAL: Roger Maris (NY)
NL: Dick Groat (PIT)
AL championsNew York Yankees
  AL runners-upBaltimore Orioles
NL championsPittsburgh Pirates
  NL runners-upMilwaukee Braves
World Series
ChampionsPittsburgh Pirates
  Runners-upNew York Yankees
World Series MVPBobby Richardson (NY)
MLB seasons

The 1960 Major League Baseball season was played from April 12 to October 13, 1960. It was the final season contested by 16 clubs and the final season that a 154-game schedule was played in both the American League and the National League. The AL began using the 162-game schedule the following season, with the NL following suit in 1962.

The season ended with the Pittsburgh Pirates, led by second baseman Bill Mazeroski, defeating the New York Yankees, led by outfield sluggers Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris in the World Series. The series ending, with Mazeroski hitting a walk-off home run in Game 7, is among the most memorable in baseball history.

Awards and honors

MLB statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Pete Runnels BOS .320 Dick Groat PIT .325
HR Mickey Mantle NY 40 Ernie Banks CHC 41
RBIs Roger Maris NY 112 Hank Aaron MIL 126
Wins Chuck Estrada BAL
Jim Perry CLE
18 Ernie Broglio STL
Warren Spahn MIL
21
ERA Frank Baumann CHW 2.67 Mike McCormick SF 2.70
SO Jim Bunning DET 201 Don Drysdale LA 246
SV Mike Fornieles BAL
Johnny Klippstein CLE
14 Lindy McDaniel STL 26
SB Luis Aparicio CHW 51 Maury Wills LA 50

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  World Series
       
  AL New York Yankees 3
  NL Pittsburgh Pirates 4

Managers

American League

Team Manager Comments
Baltimore Orioles Paul Richards
Boston Red Sox Billy Jurges Replaced during the season by Pinky Higgins
Chicago White Sox Al López
Cleveland Indians Joe Gordon Traded during the season for Jimmie Dykes
Detroit Tigers Jimmie Dykes Traded during the season for Joe Gordon
Kansas City Athletics Bob Elliott
New York Yankees Casey Stengel Won the American League pennant
Washington Senators Cookie Lavagetto

National League

Team Manager Comments
Chicago Cubs Charlie Grimm Traded during the season for Lou Boudreau
Cincinnati Reds Fred Hutchinson
Los Angeles Dodgers Walter Alston
Milwaukee Braves Chuck Dressen
Philadelphia Phillies Eddie Sawyer Replaced during the season by Gene Mauch
Pittsburgh Pirates Danny Murtaugh Won World Series
San Francisco Giants Bill Rigney Replaced during the season by Tom Sheehan
St. Louis Cardinals Solly Hemus

Home Field Attendance

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game
Los Angeles Dodgers[1] 82 -6.8% 2,253,887 8.8% 29,271
San Francisco Giants[2] 79 -4.8% 1,795,356 26.2% 23,316
Pittsburgh Pirates[3] 95 21.8% 1,705,828 25.4% 21,870
Chicago White Sox[4] 87 -7.4% 1,644,460 15.6% 21,357
New York Yankees[5] 97 22.8% 1,627,349 4.9% 21,134
Milwaukee Braves[6] 88 2.3% 1,497,799 -14.4% 19,452
Baltimore Orioles[7] 89 20.3% 1,187,849 33.2% 15,427
Detroit Tigers[8] 71 -6.6% 1,167,669 -4.4% 15,165
Boston Red Sox[9] 65 -13.3% 1,129,866 14.8% 14,674
St. Louis Cardinals[10] 86 21.1% 1,096,632 17.9% 14,242
Cleveland Indians[11] 76 -14.6% 950,985 -36.5% 12,350
Philadelphia Phillies[12] 59 -7.8% 862,205 7.4% 11,197
Chicago Cubs[13] 60 -18.9% 809,770 -5.6% 10,250
Kansas City Athletics[14] 58 -12.1% 774,944 -19.6% 9,935
Washington Senators[15] 73 15.9% 743,404 20.8% 9,655
Cincinnati Reds[16] 67 -9.5% 663,486 -17.2% 8,617

Events

January–February

March–April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November–December

See also

References

  1. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "Chicago Cubs at Los Angeles Dodgers Box Score, April 12, 1960".
  18. ^ Mackin, Bob (2004). The Unofficial Guide to Baseball's Most Unusual Records. Canada: Greystone Books. p. 240. ISBN 9781553650386.