1999 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 4 – October 27, 1999
Number of games162
Number of teams30
TV partner(s)Fox/FSN, ESPN, NBC
Draft
Top draft pickJosh Hamilton
Picked byTampa Bay Devil Rays
Regular Season
Season MVPAL: Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
NL: Chipper Jones (ATL)
League Postseason
AL championsNew York Yankees
  AL runners-upBoston Red Sox
NL championsAtlanta Braves
  NL runners-upNew York Mets
World Series
ChampionsNew York Yankees
  Runners-upAtlanta Braves
World Series MVPMariano Rivera (NYY)
MLB seasons

The 1999 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees sweeping the Atlanta Braves in the World Series.

The previous record of most home runs hit in a season, set at 5,064 in 1998,[1] was broken once again as the American League and National League combined to hit 5,528 home runs.[2] Moreover, it was the first season in 49 [3] years to feature a team that scored 1,000 runs in a season, as the Cleveland Indians led the Majors with 1,009 runs scored.[4] Only 193 shutouts were recorded in 2,427 regular-season games.[5] The 1999 season was the first season in which the two current New York City-area MLB teams, the Yankees and Mets, qualified for the playoffs together in the same season. The following season, both teams reached the World Series and the Yankees won four games to one.

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  Division Series
(ALDS, NLDS)
League Championship Series
(NLCS, ALCS)
World Series
                           
  1 NY Yankees 3  
3 Texas 0  
  1 NY Yankees 4  
American League
  4 Boston 1  
2 Cleveland 2
  4 Boston 3  
    AL1 NY Yankees 4
  NL1 Atlanta 0
  1 Atlanta 3  
3 Houston 1  
  1 Atlanta 4
National League
  4 NY Mets 2  
2 Arizona 1
  4 NY Mets 3  

Note: Two teams in the same division could not meet in the division series.

Awards and honors

Further information: 1999 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Baseball Writers' Association of America Awards
BBWAA Award National League American League
Rookie of the Year Scott Williamson (CIN) Carlos Beltrán (KC)
Cy Young Award Randy Johnson (ARI) Pedro Martínez (BOS)
Manager of the Year Jack McKeon (CIN) Jimy Williams (BOS)
Most Valuable Player Chipper Jones (ATL) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
Gold Glove Awards
Position National League American League
Pitcher Greg Maddux (ATL) Mike Mussina (BAL)
Catcher Mike Lieberthal (PHI) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman J. T. Snow (SF) Rafael Palmeiro (TEX)
Second Baseman Pokey Reese (CIN) Roberto Alomar (CLE)
Third Baseman Robin Ventura (NYM) Scott Brosius (NYY)
Shortstop Rey Ordonez (NYM) Omar Vizquel (CLE)
Outfielders Steve Finley (ARI) Bernie Williams (NYY)
Larry Walker (COL) Shawn Green (TOR)
Andruw Jones (ATL) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Silver Slugger Awards
Pitcher/Designated Hitter Mike Hampton (HOU) Rafael Palmeiro (TEX)
Catcher Mike Piazza (NYM) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman Jeff Bagwell (HOU) Carlos Delgado (TOR)
Second Baseman Edgardo Alfonzo (NYM) Roberto Alomar (CLE)
Third Baseman Chipper Jones (ATL) Dean Palmer (DET)
Shortstop Barry Larkin (CIN) Alex Rodriguez (SEA)
Outfielders Sammy Sosa (CHC) Shawn Green (TOR)
Vladimir Guerrero (MTL) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Larry Walker (COL) Manny Ramirez (CLE)

MLB statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Nomar Garciaparra BOS .357 Larry Walker COL .379
HR Ken Griffey, Jr. SEA 48 Mark McGwire STL 65
RBI Manny Ramírez CLE 165 Mark McGwire STL 147
Wins Pedro Martínez1 BOS 23 Mike Hampton HOU 22
ERA Pedro Martínez1 BOS 2.07 Randy Johnson ARI 2.48
SO Pedro Martínez1 BOS 313 Randy Johnson ARI 364
SV Mariano Rivera NYY 45 Ugueth Urbina MTL 41
SB Brian Hunter DET/SEA 44 Tony Womack ARI 72

1American League Triple Crown Pitching Winner

Managers

American League

Team Manager Comments
Anaheim Angels Terry Collins, Joe Maddon Collins (51–82, .383), Maddon (19–10, .655)
Baltimore Orioles Ray Miller
Boston Red Sox Jimy Williams
Chicago White Sox Jerry Manuel
Cleveland Indians Mike Hargrove
Detroit Tigers Larry Parrish
Kansas City Royals Tony Muser
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly
New York Yankees Joe Torre Won the World Series
Oakland Athletics Art Howe
Seattle Mariners Lou Piniella
Tampa Bay Devil Rays Larry Rothschild
Texas Rangers Johnny Oates
Toronto Blue Jays Jim Fregosi

National League

Team Manager Comments
Arizona Diamondbacks Buck Showalter
Atlanta Braves Bobby Cox Won National League pennant
Chicago Cubs Jim Riggleman
Cincinnati Reds Jack McKeon
Colorado Rockies Jim Leyland
Florida Marlins John Boles, Jr.
Houston Astros Larry Dierker, Matt Galante Dierker (84–51, .622), Galante (13–14, .481)
Los Angeles Dodgers Davey Johnson
Milwaukee Brewers Phil Garner, Jim Lefebvre Garner (52–60, .464), Lefebvre (22–27, .449)
Montreal Expos Felipe Alou
New York Mets Bobby Valentine
Philadelphia Phillies Terry Francona
Pittsburgh Pirates Gene Lamont
St. Louis Cardinals Tony La Russa
San Diego Padres Bruce Bochy
San Francisco Giants Dusty Baker

Home Field Attendance & Payroll

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game Est. Payroll
Colorado Rockies[6] 72 -6.5% 3,481,065 -8.2% 42,976 $61,935,837 22.7%
Cleveland Indians[7] 97 9.0% 3,468,456 0.0% 42,820 $73,679,962 19.4%
Baltimore Orioles[8] 78 -1.3% 3,433,150 -6.8% 42,385 $80,805,863 11.4%
New York Yankees[9] 98 -14.0% 3,292,736 11.4% 40,651 $86,934,359 30.1%
Atlanta Braves[10] 103 -2.8% 3,284,897 -2.3% 40,554 $73,341,000 19.9%
St. Louis Cardinals[11] 75 -9.6% 3,225,334 0.9% 40,317 $49,988,195 -8.6%
Los Angeles Dodgers[12] 77 -7.2% 3,095,346 0.2% 38,214 $81,062,453 66.0%
Arizona Diamondbacks[13] 100 53.8% 3,019,654 -16.4% 37,280 $68,703,999 112.4%
Seattle Mariners[14] 79 3.9% 2,916,346 10.0% 36,004 $54,125,003 -1.2%
Chicago Cubs[15] 67 -25.6% 2,813,854 7.3% 34,739 $62,343,000 22.6%
Texas Rangers[16] 95 8.0% 2,771,469 -5.3% 34,216 $76,709,931 35.2%
New York Mets[17] 97 10.2% 2,725,668 19.1% 33,650 $68,852,092 31.8%
Houston Astros[18] 97 -4.9% 2,706,017 10.1% 33,000 $55,114,000 30.1%
San Diego Padres[19] 74 -24.5% 2,523,538 -1.3% 31,155 $49,768,179 6.2%
Boston Red Sox[20] 94 2.2% 2,446,162 5.7% 30,200 $64,097,500 12.6%
Anaheim Angels[21] 70 -17.6% 2,253,123 -10.6% 27,816 $55,633,166 33.1%
Toronto Blue Jays[22] 84 -4.5% 2,163,464 -11.9% 26,709 $45,444,333 -11.5%
San Francisco Giants[23] 86 -3.4% 2,078,399 7.9% 25,659 $46,798,057 9.5%
Cincinnati Reds[24] 96 24.7% 2,061,222 14.9% 25,137 $33,962,761 47.6%
Detroit Tigers[25] 69 6.2% 2,026,441 43.8% 25,018 $36,689,666 51.2%
Philadelphia Phillies[26] 77 2.7% 1,825,337 6.4% 22,535 $31,897,500 -12.1%
Milwaukee Brewers[27] 74 0.0% 1,701,796 -6.1% 21,272 $43,377,395 27.1%
Pittsburgh Pirates[28] 78 13.0% 1,638,023 4.9% 20,223 $25,047,666 66.3%
Tampa Bay Devil Rays[29] 69 9.5% 1,562,827 -37.6% 19,294 $38,870,000 42.5%
Kansas City Royals[30] 64 -11.1% 1,506,068 0.7% 18,826 $26,660,000 -30.0%
Oakland Athletics[31] 87 17.6% 1,434,610 16.4% 17,711 $24,831,833 15.6%
Florida Marlins[32] 64 18.5% 1,369,421 -20.9% 17,118 $21,085,000 -49.6%
Chicago White Sox[33] 75 -6.3% 1,338,851 -3.8% 16,529 $25,820,000 -35.2%
Minnesota Twins[34] 63 -10.0% 1,202,829 3.2% 14,850 $22,107,500 -21.3%
Montreal Expos[35] 68 4.6% 773,277 -15.5% 9,547 $17,903,000 68.2%

Events

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Deaths

January–April

May–August

September–December

See also

References

  1. ^ "1998 Major League Baseball Standard Batting - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on November 13, 2017. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  2. ^ "1999 Major League Baseball Standard Batting - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on November 15, 2017. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  3. ^ "1950 Boston Red Sox Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on November 9, 2017. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  4. ^ "1999 Cleveland Indians Statistics - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on May 4, 2018. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  5. ^ "1999 Major League Baseball Standard Pitching - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on October 4, 2017. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  6. ^ "Colorado Rockies Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "Arizona Diamondbacks Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. ^ "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. ^ "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. ^ "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  28. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  29. ^ "Tampa Bay Rays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  30. ^ "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  31. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  32. ^ "Florida Marlins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  33. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  34. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  35. ^ "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  36. ^ Kepner, Tyler (July 16, 1999). "Field of dreams; nightmare result". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). (Seattle Post-Intelligencer). p. 1C.
  37. ^ Cour, Jim (July 16, 1999). "The dome is no longer Mariners home". Moscow-Pullman Daily News. (Idaho-Washington). Associated Press. p. 1B.
  38. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p.70, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0