7th St/Metro Center
A Line  B Line  D Line  E Line  J Line 
7th-Metro Center platform 2016.jpg
The tracks for the A and E Lines cross over the tracks for the B and D Lines
General information
Other names7th Street/Metro Center/Julian Dixon
Location660 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, California
Coordinates34°02′55″N 118°15′31″W / 34.0487°N 118.2587°W / 34.0487; -118.2587Coordinates: 34°02′55″N 118°15′31″W / 34.0487°N 118.2587°W / 34.0487; -118.2587
Owned byLos Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority
Platforms2 side platforms (light rail)
1 island platform (subway)
Tracks4
ConnectionsSee Connections section
Construction
Structure typeUnderground
ParkingPaid parking nearby
Bicycle facilitiesMetro Bike Share station[1]
Disabled accessYes
History
OpenedFebruary 15, 1991; 31 years ago (1991-02-15)
Services
Preceding station LAMetroLogo.svg Metro Rail Following station
Westlake/​MacArthur Park B Line Pershing Square
Westlake/​MacArthur Park D Line
Pico A Line Terminus
Pico E Line
Preceding station LAMetroLogo.svg Metro Busway Following station
Pico
(with interim stops)
J Line
(street service)
Pershing Square
(with interim stops)
toward El Monte
Future services
Preceding station LAMetroLogo.svg Metro Rail Following station
Pico A Line Grand Av Arts/Bunker Hill
Pico E Line Grand Av Arts/Bunker Hill
toward Atlantic
Location

7th Street/Metro Center station is an underground light rail and rapid transit (known locally as a subway) station on the A Line, B Line, D Line and E Line of the Los Angeles Metro Rail system. The station also has street level stops for the J Line of the Los Angeles Metro Busway system. The station is located under 7th Street, after which the station is named, at its intersections with Figueroa, Flower and Hope Streets.[2] This station is the current northern and eastern terminus for the A Line and E Line, respectively. Both lines are expected to be extended in 2022 as part of the Regional Connector project.

It is officially named 7th Street/Metro Center/Julian Dixon station after former U.S. Rep. Julian Dixon, who had pivotal role in obtaining the federal funding that enabled construction of the Metro Rail system.[3]

History

7th Street/Metro Center was constructed by the Southern California Rapid Transit District, which later became part of today's LA Metro, as part of the first 4.5-mile (7.2 km) minimum operating segment (MOS-1) of the Metro Rail subway line. Ground was broken for the project on September 29, 1986.[4]

The upper level of this station, used by light rail trains, opened on February 15, 1991, nearly two years before the rest of the MOS-1 subway stations. However the opening was several months after the rest of the Blue Line stations (now called the A Line).[5] The lower level subway platform opened with the rest of the MOS-1 segment stations on January 30, 1993.[6]

Metro spent nearly $2 million worth of enhancements to 7th Street/Metro Center station as part of the Expo Line project which was completed weeks before the Metro Expo Line began service to La Cienega/Jefferson Station. This enhancement included a new dispatch booth and improved signage in the station.[7]

Service

Station layout

The Bloc shopping mall in 2017
The Bloc shopping mall in 2017

The station was the first underground station in the Metro system, and consists of three underground levels. The main concourse is on the first level down, the light rail side platforms are on the second level down, while the heavy rail island platform is on the third level down. A small first level mezzanine connects the light rail side platforms. The Metro Silver Line stops at the street level next to the station's entrances. The station has direct access to The Bloc Shopping Mall (formerly known as Macy's Plaza) with a pedestrian-friendly entrance from the mall directly to the subway station.

This is one of only two stations in the entire system that has underground side platforms, the other being the Wilshire/Vermont station.

G Street level Entrances/Exits
Figueroa St/7th St (Northbound)  J Line toward El Monte (Pershing Square)
Flower St/7th St (Southbound)  J Line toward Harbor Gateway or San Pedro (Flower/Olympic)
B1 North Mezzanine Faregates, ticket machines, to 7th Street/Flower Street
Walkway between Platform 1 and Platform 2
B2 East Mezzanine Faregates, ticket machines, to 7th Street/Hope Street
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Platform 1 E Line E Line toward Downtown Santa Monica (Pico)
A Line A Line (under construction) toward APU/Citrus College (Grand Av Arts/Bunker Hill)
E Line E Line (under construction) toward Atlantic (Grand Av Arts/Bunker Hill)
Platform 2 A Line A Line toward Downtown Long Beach (Pico)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
West Mezzanine Faregates, ticket machines, to 7th Street/Figueroa Street
B3 Platform 3 (Northbound/Westbound) B Line B Line toward North Hollywood (Westlake/​MacArthur Park)
D Line D Line toward Wilshire/Western (Westlake/MacArthur Park)
Island platform, doors will open on the left
Platform 4 (Eastbound) B Line B Line and D Line D Line toward Union Station (Pershing Square)

Hours and frequency

A Line & E Line platforms (upper level)
A Line & E Line platforms (upper level)
B Line & D Line platforms (lower level), note the signage uses the "7th Street/Metro Center/Julian Dixon" station name
B Line & D Line platforms (lower level), note the signage uses the "7th Street/Metro Center/Julian Dixon" station name

A Line trains run every day between approximately 4:00 a.m. and 12:30 am. Trains operate every ten minutes during peak hours Monday through Friday, every twelve minutes during the daytime on weekdays and all day on the weekends after approximately 8 a.m. (with a 15/20-minute headway early Saturday and Sunday mornings). Night service is every 20 minutes.[8]

B Line trains run every day between approximately 4:30 a.m. and midnight and D Line every day trains run between approximately 5 a.m. and midnight. Towards North Hollywood or Wilshire/Western, trains operate every ten minutes during peak hours Monday through Friday, every twelve minutes during the daytime on weekdays and all day on the weekends after approximately 10 a.m. (with a 15-minute headway early Saturday and Sunday mornings). Night service is every 20 minutes. Towards Union Station, trains operate every five minutes during peak hours Monday through Friday, every six minutes during the daytime on weekdays and all day on the weekends after approximately 10 a.m. (with a 7.5-minute headway early Saturday and Sunday mornings). Night service is every 10 minutes.[9]

J Line buses run 24 hours a day between El Monte Station, Downtown Los Angeles, and the Harbor Gateway Transit Center as route 910, with some trips continuing on to San Pedro between 6am and 8 pm and signed as Route 950. On weekdays, buses operate every four to ten minutes during peak hours, with longer headways of 15 minutes during the daytime, 20 minutes during evenings, 40 minutes during nights and every hour overnight. On weekends, buses arrive every 20 minutes most of the day, with longer headways of 40 minutes during nights and every hour overnight.[10]

Connections

In addition to the rail and busway services, 7th Street/Metro Center station is a major hub for municipal bus lines. As of December 19, 2021, the following connections are available:[11]

Note: * indicates commuter service that operates only during weekday rush hours.

Future service

Main article: Regional Connector

When the Regional Connector is complete and opens for service in 2022, this station will no longer be the terminus for the A and E Lines. Instead, the rail lines will continue northeast to the rebuilt Little Tokyo/Arts District station on the current L Line. In addition, a complete restructuring of service will commence as follows:

References

  1. ^ "Station Map". Metro Bike Share. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  2. ^ "7th St/Metro Center Connections" (PDF). Metro. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-02-25. Retrieved 2021-11-18.
  3. ^ Jager, Rick (August 2, 2001). "MTA Unveils Plaque Honoring Late Congressman Julian Dixon" (PDF). MyMetro (employee news digest). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2012-08-06 – via Dorothy Peyton Gray Transportation Library and Archive.
  4. ^ "25 Years Ago Today: Los Angeles' Red Line Subway Breaks Ground". Dorothy Peyton Gray Transportation Library and Archive. September 29, 2011. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  5. ^ Taylor, Ronald B. (1991-01-17). "Blue Line's Ridership, Safety Praised After Initial 6 Months : Transit: Officials say 18,000 commuters daily use the trains, three times the number expected. Crime is low; accidents with cars and pedestrians are main problem". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2021-11-18.
  6. ^ Katches, Mark (January 31, 1993). "Red Line Rolls to Raves – It's Smooth Railing As L.A. Subway Opens". Los Angeles Daily News.
  7. ^ "Project: Exposition Light Rail Transit Project – Phase 1" (PDF). Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 15, 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-06-29. Retrieved 2010-09-07.
  8. ^ "Metro A Line schedule". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. September 12, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  9. ^ "Metro B Line/D Line schedule". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. September 12, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  10. ^ "Metro J Line schedule". Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. September 12, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  11. ^ "A Line Timetable – Connections section" (PDF). Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. December 19, 2021. p. 2.