This article or section should specify the language of its non-English content, using ((lang)), ((transliteration)) for transliterated languages, and ((IPA)) for phonetic transcriptions, with an appropriate ISO 639 code. Wikipedia's multilingual support templates may also be used. See why. (August 2022)
Grenadian Creole
Patwa LaGwinad
Native toGrenada
Native speakers
2,300 (2004)[1]
Official status
Official language in
 Grenada
Language codes
ISO 639-3

Grenadian Creole is a variety of Antillean Creole.[2] In Grenada and among Grenadians, it is referred to as Patois.

History

The first successful settlement by a western colonial power in Grenada was in 1650, when the French from Martinique established friendly contact with the native Caribs. The French had no ruling power or influence on the island or the population, as it was the British Empire who took control of the island in the 17th century. In 1921, a census of Grenada reported that the language was "slowly dying out" and was "only spoken among a small number of the adult population of the rural districts".[3] Today most of the population speaks Grenadian Creole English.

Sample Words and Expressions

References

  1. ^ Saint Lucian Creole (Grenada) at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015) (subscription required)
  2. ^ Ethnologue report for language code:acf
  3. ^ Holm, John A. (1988). Pidgins and Creoles: Volume 2, Reference Survey. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 376. ISBN 0521359406.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k La Grenade-Lashley, Marise (April 15, 2016). Mwen Ka Alé: The French-lexicon Creole of Grenada: History, Language and Culture. Aventine Press. p. 154. ISBN 978-1593309039. Retrieved 22 August 2021.
  5. ^ "A (Very) Private Resident's View of The Grenadian by Rex vs. Government of Grenada". nowgrenada.com. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  6. ^ a b Hughes, Alister. "The Influences of French Creole on the Grenadian "Language"". Montray Kréyol. Retrieved 22 August 2021.
  7. ^ Crask, Paul (March 17, 2009). Grenada, Carriacou & Petite Martinique (First ed.). Bradt Travel Guides. p. 27. ISBN 978-1841622743. Retrieved 23 August 2021.

Further reading