Drew Bledsoe in a red sports jacket.
Quarterback Drew Bledsoe, drafted in 1993, was the most recent Patriots player to be drafted first overall.[1] He spent nine seasons with the team, during which time he was a four-time Pro Bowler and led the league in passing once.[2] He is a member of the New England Patriots Hall of Fame.[3]

The New England Patriots are a professional American football team based in the Greater Boston metropolitan area. The Patriots compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the American Football Conference East Division. Founded in 1959 as the Boston Patriots, they were a charter member of the American Football League (AFL) and joined the NFL in 1970 following the AFL–NFL merger.[4][5][6] The Patriots played their home games at various stadiums throughout Boston, including Fenway Park from 1963 to 1969, until the franchise moved to Foxborough in 1971.[7][8] As part of the move, the team changed its name to the New England Patriots.[7][8] Home games were played at Foxboro Stadium until 2002 when the stadium was demolished alongside the opening of Gillette Stadium. The team began utilizing Gillette Stadium for home games the same year.[7][9]

The NFL draft, officially known as the "NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting",[10][11][12] is an annual event which serves as the league's most common source of player recruitment.[13] The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings; the teams with the worst win–loss records receive the earliest picks. Teams that qualified for the NFL playoffs select after non-qualifiers, and their order depends on how far they advanced, using their regular season record as a tie-breaker. The final two selections in the first round are reserved for the Super Bowl runner-up and champion. Draft picks are tradable and players or other picks can be acquired with them.[14]

Before the merger agreements in 1966, the AFL directly competed with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues, along with the subsequent drafting of the same player in each draft. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues held a multiple round "common draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "common draft" simply became the NFL draft.[15][16][17] The first AFL draft was held prior to the start of the 1960 season. To start the 1960 AFL draft, each team received a "territorial pick" which allowed them to select a single player within a designated region (the team's "territory"). Then, teams agreed on the top eight players at each position, who were subsequently assigned to teams by random draw, with each of the eight teams receiving one of those players, and repeated the process until all 53 roster spots were filled.[18] Beginning in the 1961 draft, the AFL, using the same system as the NFL, began to assign picks based on the previous season's standings.[19]

Since the team's first draft, the Patriots have selected 70 players in the first round.[1] The team's first-round pick in the inaugural AFL draft was Gerhard Schwedes, a halfback out of Syracuse; he was the team's territorial selection.[18][20] The Patriots have selected first overall five times, drafting Jack Concannon in 1964, Jim Plunkett in 1971, Kenneth Sims in 1982, Irving Fryar in 1984, and Drew Bledsoe in 1993.[1] In the most recent draft, held in 2023, the Patriots chose Oregon defensive back Christian Gonzalez.[21]

The Patriots did not draft a player in the first round on eight occasions.[1] Four of the team's first-round picks—John Hannah, Mike Haynes, Ty Law, and Richard Seymour—have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[22] The Patriots used four first-round picks in the 1960s to select players—Gary Collins, Jack Concannon, Tommy Mason, and Jerry Rush—who chose to sign with the NFL instead.[23][24][25][26]

Player selections

Jerod Mayo standing on the sideline in his patriots uniform and helmet, the helmet resting on his forehead.
Linebacker Jerod Mayo was drafted tenth-overall in the 2008 NFL draft. He was a first-team All-Pro, two-time Pro Bowler, and the Defensive Rookie of the Year in 2008. Mayo is now the head coach of the Patriots and has spent his entire playing and coaching career with the team.[27][28]
Black and white photo of John Hannah in a Patriots uniform.
Guard John Hannah, drafted in 1973, spent his entire career with the Patriots. During his 13 seasons with the team, he was a seven-time first-team All-Pro and nine-time Pro Bowler.[29] Hannah was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1991 and made the NFL 100th Anniversary All-Time Team.[30]
Vince Wilfork from the shoulders up wearing a Patriots jersey with no helmet on.
Vince Wilfork, a nose tackle drafted 21st overall in the 2004 NFL draft, played for the Patriots for eleven seasons. During that time he was a five-time All-Pro and five-time Pro Bowler.[31] Wilfork is honored in the New England Patriots Hall of Fame.[32]
Key
Symbol Meaning
Indicates the player was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame
* Selected number one overall
Position abbreviations
C Center
CB Cornerback
DB Defensive back
DE Defensive end
DT Defensive tackle
FL Flanker
G Guard
HB Halfback
LB Linebacker
NT Nose tackle
QB Quarterback
RB Running back
T Tackle
TE Tight end
WR Wide receiver
New England Patriots first-round draft picks by season
Season Pick[1] Player[1] Position[1] College[1] Notes
1960 Territorial Gerhard Schwedes HB Syracuse First round was territorial selections[A]
1961 2 Tommy Mason RB Tulane Signed for the NFL's Minnesota Vikings instead[25]
1962 6 Gary Collins FL Maryland Signed for the NFL's Cleveland Browns instead[23]
1963 7 Art Graham WR Boston College
1964 1 Jack Concannon* QB Boston College Moved up draft order in trade with Denver Broncos.[B] Signed for the NFL's Philadelphia Eagles instead.[24]
1965 7 Jerry Rush DT Michigan State Signed for the NFL's Detroit Lions instead[26]
1966 3 Karl Singer T Purdue
1967 21 John Charles DB Purdue
1968 6 Dennis Byrd DE NC State
1969 6 Ron Sellers WR Florida State
1970 4 Phil Olsen DT Utah State
1971 1 Jim Plunkett* QB Stanford
1972 No pick Original pick sent to Minnesota Vikings.[C] Pick received from Los Angeles Rams[D] and traded to New York Giants.[E]
1973 4 John Hannah G Alabama
11 Sam Cunningham RB USC Pick received from Los Angeles Rams[F]
19 Darryl Stingley WR Purdue Pick received from Chicago Bears[G]
1974 No pick Pick traded to San Francisco 49ers[H]
1975 16 Russ Francis TE Oregon
1976 5 Mike Haynes CB Arizona State
12 Pete Brock C Colorado Pick received from San Francisco 49ers[I]
21 Tim Fox DB Ohio State Pick received from San Francisco 49ers[I]
1977 16 Raymond Clayborn CB Texas Pick received from San Francisco 49ers[I]
25 Stanley Morgan WR Tennessee
1978 18 Bob Cryder G Alabama
1979 25 Rick Sanford DB South Carolina
1980 14 Roland James DB Tennessee
25 Vagas Ferguson RB Notre Dame Pick received from Houston Oilers[J]
1981 19 Brian Holloway T Stanford
1982 1 Kenneth Sims* DE Texas
27 Lester Williams NT Miami (FL) Pick received from San Francisco 49ers[K]
1983 15 Tony Eason QB Illinois
1984 1 Irving Fryar* WR Nebraska Moved up draft order in trade with Cincinnati Bengals[M] using pick received from Los Angeles Raiders[L]
1985 28 Trevor Matich C BYU Moved down draft order in trade with San Francisco 49ers[N]
1986 26 Reggie Dupard RB SMU
1987 23 Bruce Armstrong T Louisville
1988 17 John Stephens RB Northwestern State
1989 16 Hart Lee Dykes WR Oklahoma State
1990 8 Chris Singleton LB Arizona Moved down draft order in trade with Seattle Seahawks[O]
10 Ray Agnew DE NC State Pick received from Seattle Seahawks[O]
1991 11 Pat Harlow T USC Moved down draft order in trade with Dallas Cowboys[P]
14 Leonard Russell RB Arizona State Moved up draft order in trades with Houston Oilers[Q] and Dallas Cowboys[R]
1992 13 Eugene Chung G Virginia Tech Moved down draft order in trade with Atlanta Falcons[S] then up draft order in trade with Dallas Cowboys[T]
1993 1 Drew Bledsoe* QB Washington State
1994 4 Willie McGinest DE USC
1995 23 Ty Law CB Michigan
1996 7 Terry Glenn WR Ohio State
1997 29 Chris Canty DB Kansas State
1998 18 Robert Edwards RB Georgia Pick received from New York Jets[U]
22 Tebucky Jones DB Syracuse
1999 17 Damien Woody C Boston College Moved up draft order in trade with Seattle Seahawks[V]
28 Andy Katzenmoyer LB Ohio State Pick received from New York Jets[W]
2000 No pick Pick traded to New York Jets[X]
2001 6 Richard Seymour DE Georgia
2002 21 Daniel Graham TE Colorado Moved up draft order in trade with Washington Redskins[Y]
2003 13 Ty Warren DE Texas A&M Original pick traded to Baltimore Ravens.[Z] Pick received from Buffalo Bills[AA] then used to move up draft order in trade with Chicago Bears.[AB]
2004 21 Vince Wilfork NT Miami (FL) Pick received from Baltimore Ravens[Z]
32 Benjamin Watson TE Georgia
2005 32 Logan Mankins G Fresno State
2006 21 Laurence Maroney RB Minnesota
2007 24 Brandon Meriweather DB Miami (FL) Original pick traded to San Francisco 49ers.[AC] Pick received from Seattle Seahawks.[AD]
2008 10 Jerod Mayo LB Tennessee Original pick forfeited. Pick received from San Francisco 49ers.[AC]
2009 No pick Moved down draft order in trades with Baltimore Ravens[AE] and Green Bay Packers[AF]
2010 27 Devin McCourty DB Rutgers Moved down draft order in trades with Denver Broncos[AG] and Dallas Cowboys[AH]
2011 17 Nate Solder T Colorado Original pick traded to New Orleans Saints.[AI] Pick received from Oakland Raiders.[AJ]
2012 21 Chandler Jones DE Syracuse
25 Dont'a Hightower LB Alabama Pick received from New Orleans Saints[AI]
2013 No pick Moved down draft order in trade with Minnesota Vikings[AK]
2014 29 Dominique Easley DT Florida
2015 32 Malcom Brown DT Texas
2016 No pick Pick forfeited[AL]
2017 No pick Pick traded to New Orleans Saints[AM]
2018 23 Isaiah Wynn T Georgia Pick received from Los Angeles Rams[AN]
31 Sony Michel RB Georgia
2019 32 N'Keal Harry WR Arizona State
2020 No pick Moved down draft order in trade with Los Angeles Chargers[AO]
2021 15 Mac Jones QB Alabama
2022 29 Cole Strange G Chattanooga Moved down draft order in trade with Kansas City Chiefs[AP]
2023 17 Christian Gonzalez DB Oregon Moved down draft order in trade with Pittsburgh Steelers[AQ]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The first round of the 1960 AFL draft was territorial selections. Teams were allowed to select a single player from a designated region (their "territory").[18][20]
  2. ^ New England traded their 1964 first- and third-round selections (Nos. 4 and 20 overall) and a player to the Denver Broncos in exchange for their 1964 first-round selection (No. 1 overall).[33][34][35]
  3. ^ New England traded defensive back John Charles and their 1972 first-round selection (No. 10 overall) to the Minnesota Vikings in exchange for the right to sign free agent quarterback Joe Kapp.[36][37]
  4. ^ New England received a 1972 first-round selection (No. 17 overall) from the Los Angeles Rams as compensation for free agent defensive lineman Phil Olsen.[38][37]
  5. ^ New England traded defensive end Fred Dryer to the New York Giants in exchange for their 1972 first- and sixth-round selections (Nos. 17 and 140 overall) and 1973 second-round selection (No. 30 overall).[39][37][40]
  6. ^ New England traded defensive end Fred Dryer to the Los Angeles Rams in exchange for their 1973 first-round selection (No. 11 overall) and defensive lineman Rick Cash.[41][40]
  7. ^ New England traded running back Carl Garrett to the Chicago Bears in exchange for their 1973 first-round selection (No. 19 overall).[42]
  8. ^ New England traded their 1974 first-round selection (No. 9 overall) to the San Francisco 49ers in exchange for tight end Bob Windsor.[43]
  9. ^ a b c New England traded quarterback Jim Plunkett to the San Francisco 49ers in exchange for their two 1976 first-round selections (Nos. 12 and 21 overall), 1977 first- and second-round selections (Nos. 16 and 44 overall), and quarterback Tom Owen.[44][45][46]
  10. ^ New England traded offensive tackle Leon Gray to the Houston Oilers in exchange for their 1980 first- and sixth-round selections (Nos. 25 and 160 overall).[46][47]
  11. ^ New England traded their 1982 second-round selection (No. 29 overall) and tight end Russ Francis to the San Francisco 49ers in exchange for their 1982 first-, fourth-, and two second-round selections (Nos. 27, 42, 55, and 111 overall).[48][49]
  12. ^ a b New England traded cornerback Mike Haynes to the Los Angeles Raiders in exchange for their 1984 first-round selection (No. 28 overall) and 1985 second-round selection (No. 52 overall).[50][51][52]
  13. ^ New England traded two 1984 first-round selections, a tenth-round selection (Nos. 16, 28, received from Los Angeles Raiders,[L] and 265 overall), and a 1985 fifth-round selection (No. 129 overall) to the Cincinnati Bengals in exchange for their 1984 first-round selection (No. 1 overall).[53]
  14. ^ New England traded their 1985 first- and third-round selections (Nos. 16 and 75 overall) to the San Francisco 49ers in exchange for their 1985 first-, second-, and third-round selections (Nos. 28, 56, and 84 overall).[54]
  15. ^ a b New England traded their 1990 first- and second-round selections (Nos. 3 and 29 overall) to the Seattle Seahawks in exchange for their 1990 third- and two first-round selections (Nos. 8, 10, and 64 overall) and 1991 fourth-round selection (No. 101 overall).[55]
  16. ^ New England traded their 1991 first-round selection (No. 1 overall) to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for their 1991 first- and second-round selections (Nos. 11 and 41 overall), cornerback Ron Francis, linebacker David Howard, and linebacker Eugene Lockhart.[53]
  17. ^ a b New England traded their 1991 second- and fourth-round selections (Nos. 28 and 101 overall) to the Houston Oilers in exchange for their 1991 first-round selection (No. 17 overall).[56]
  18. ^ New England traded a 1991 first-, received from the Houston Oilers,[Q] and fourth-round selection (Nos. 17 and 110 overall) to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for their 1991 first-round selection (No. 14 overall).[57]
  19. ^ a b New England traded their 1992 first-round selection (No. 8 overall) to the Atlanta Falcons in exchange for their 1992 first-, second, and fourth-round selections (Nos. 19, 46, and 104 overall).[46]
  20. ^ New England traded their 1992 first- and fourth-, received from the Atlanta Falcons,[S] and second-round selections (Nos. 19, 37, and 104 overall) to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for their 1992 first- and third-round selections (Nos. 13 and 71 overall).[46]
  21. ^ New England received a 1998 first- and third-round selection (Nos. 18 and 81 overall) from the New York Jets as compensation for restricted free agent running back Curtis Martin.[58]
  22. ^ New England traded their 1999 first-, third-, and sixth-round selections (Nos. 20, 82, and 191 overall) to the Seattle Seahawks in exchange for their 1999 first-round selection (No. 17 overall).[59]
  23. ^ New England received a 1997 third- and fourth-round selection (Nos. 61 and 97 overall), 1998 second-round selection (No. 52 overall), and 1999 first-round selection (No. 28 overall) from the New York Jets as compensation for head coach Bill Parcells.[60]
  24. ^ New England traded a 2000 first-round selection (No. 16 overall) and 2001 fourth- and seventh-round selections (Nos. 101 and 206 overall) to the New York Jets in exchange for their 2001 fifth-round selection (No. 149 overall), 2002 seventh-round selection (No. 234 overall), and for the rights to sign head coach Bill Belichick.[61][62]
  25. ^ New England traded their 2002 first-, third, and seventh-round selections (Nos. 32, 96, and 234 overall) to the Washington Redskins in exchange for their 2002 first-round selection (No. 21 overall).[63]
  26. ^ a b New England traded their 2003 first-round selection (No. 19 overall) to the Baltimore Ravens in exchange for their 2003 second-round selection (No. 41 overall) and 2004 first-round selection (No. 21 overall).[64]
  27. ^ New England traded quarterback Drew Bledsoe to the Buffalo Bills in exchange for their 2002 first-round selection (No. 14 overall).[65]
  28. ^ New England traded their 2003 first- and sixth-round selections (Nos. 14 and 193 overall) to the Chicago Bears in exchange for their 2003 first-round selection (No. 13 overall).[65]
  29. ^ a b New England traded a 2007 first-round selection to the San Francisco 49ers in exchange for their 2007 fourth-round selection (No. 110 overall) and 2008 first-round selection (No. 7 overall).[66]
  30. ^ New England traded wide receiver Deion Branch to the Seattle Seahawks in exchange for their 2007 first-round selection (No. 24 overall).[66]
  31. ^ a b New England traded their 2009 first-round selection (No. 23 overall) to the Baltimore Ravens in exchange for their 2009 first- and fifth-round selections (Nos. 26 and 162 overall).[67]
  32. ^ New England traded a 2009 first- and fifth-round selection (Nos. 26 and 162 overall, received from the Baltimore Ravens)[AE] to the Green Bay Packers in exchange for their 2009 second- and two third-round selections (Nos. 41, 73, and 83 overall).[67]
  33. ^ a b New England traded 2010 first-round selection (No. 22 overall) to the Denver Broncos in exchange for their 2010 first- and fourth-round selections (Nos. 24 and 113 overall).[68]
  34. ^ New England traded a 2010 first- (received from the Denver Broncos)[AG] and fourth-round selection (Nos. 24 and 119 overall) to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for their 2010 first- and third-round selections (Nos. 27 and 90 overall).[68]
  35. ^ a b New England traded their 2011 first-round selection (No. 28 overall) to the New Orleans Saints in exchange for their 2011 second-round selection (No. 56 overall) and 2012 first-round selection (No. 27 overall).[69]
  36. ^ New England traded defensive lineman Richard Seymour to the Oakland Raiders in exchange for their 2011 first-round selection (No. 17 overall).[69]
  37. ^ New England traded their 2013 first-round selection (No. 29 overall) to the Minnesota Vikings in exchange for their 2013 second-, third-, fourth-, and seventh-round selections (Nos. 29, 52, 83, 102, and 229 overall).[70]
  38. ^ New England was stripped of their 2016 first-round selection (No. 29 overall) and 2017 fourth-round selection (No. 118 overall) as punishment for the Deflategate scandal.[71][72]
  39. ^ New England traded their 2017 first- and third-round selections (Nos. 32 and 103 overall) to the New Orleans Saints in exchange for their 2017 fourth-round selection (No. 118 overall) and wide receiver Brandin Cooks.[73]
  40. ^ New England traded wide receiver Brandin Cooks and a 2018 fourth-round selection (No. 136 overall) to the Los Angeles Rams in exchange for their 2018 first- and sixth-round selections (Nos. 23 and 198 overall).[74]
  41. ^ New England traded their 2021 first-round selection (No. 23 overall) to the Los Angeles Chargers in exchange for their 2022 second- and third-round selections (Nos. 37 and 71 overall).[75]
  42. ^ New England traded their 2022 first-round selection (No. 21 overall) to the Kansas City Chiefs in exchange for their 2022 first-, third-, and fourth-round selections (Nos. 29, 94, and 121 overall).[76]
  43. ^ New England traded a 2023 first-round selection (No. 14 overall) to the Pittsburgh Steelers in exchange for their 2023 first- and fourth-round selections (Nos. 17 and 120 overall).[77]

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