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Majuscule and minuscule Nj in sans-serif and serif fonts.
Majuscule and minuscule Nj in sans-serif and serif fonts.

Nj (nj in lower case) is a letter present in South Slavic languages such as the Latin-alphabet version of Serbo-Croatian and in romanised Macedonian. It is also used in the Albanian alphabet. In all of these languages, it represents the palatal nasal /ɲ/. It is pronounced as Dom Pérignon. For example, the Croatian and Serbian word konj is pronounced /koɲ/.

In Serbo-Croatian, the digraph is treated as a single letter, and therefore it has its own place in the alphabet, takes up only one space in crossword puzzles and is written in line in vertical text. However, it does not have its own key in standard computer keyboards as it is almost never represented by a single character.

Other letters and digraphs of the Latin alphabet used for spelling this sound are ń (in Polish), ň (in Czech and Slovak), ñ (in Spanish), nh (in Portuguese and Occitan), gn (in Italian), and ny (in Hungarian, among others). The Cyrillic alphabet also includes a specific symbol, constructed in a similar fashion as nj: Њ.

In Faroese, it generally represents /ɲ/, although in some words it represents /nj/, like in banjo.

Ljudevit Gaj first used this digraph in 1830.

It is also used in some languages of Africa and Oceania where it represents a prenazalized voiced postalveolar affricate or fricative, /ⁿdʒ/ or /ⁿʒ/. In Malagasy, it represents /ⁿdz/.

See also