The non-canonical books referenced in the Bible includes non-Biblical cultures and lost works of known or unknown status. By the "Bible" is meant those books recognized by Christians and Jews as being part of Old Testament (or Tanakh) as well as those recognized by most Christians as being part of the Biblical apocrypha or of the Deuterocanon.

It may also include books of the Anagignoskomena (Deuterocanonical books § In Eastern Orthodoxy) that are accepted only by Eastern Orthodox Christians. For the purposes of this article, "referenced" can mean direct quotations, paraphrases, or allusions, which in some cases are known only because they have been identified as such by ancient writers, or the citation of a work or author.

Hebrew Bible

The following are mentioned in the Hebrew Bible:

Deuterocanon / Apocrypha

Further information: Deuterocanonical books, Biblical apocrypha, and Book of Sirach § References in Sirach and pre-modern texts

New Testament

Mennonite scholar David Ewart has mentioned that Nestle's Greek New Testament lists some 132 New Testament passages that appear to be verbal allusions to paracanonical books.[48]

Pagan authors quoted or alluded to are:[49][50]

Non-canonical books quoted or alluded to are:[49]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Joshua 10:13
  2. ^ 2 Samuel 1:18
  3. ^ 2 Timothy 3:8
  4. ^ oble lase (1 December 2014), Ancient Book of Jasher/Audio Version, archived from the original on 21 December 2021, retrieved 18 June 2016
  5. ^ Edward J. Brandt, "The Book of Jasher and the Latter-day Saints," in Apocryphal Writings and the Latter-day Saints, ed. C. Wilfred Griggs (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1986), 297–318.
  6. ^ Sometimes called The Book of the Wars of Yahweh. One source says "The quotation is in lyrical form, so it is possibly a book of poetry or a hymnal...Moses quoted it, so the date of its composition must have been prior to the completion of the Pentateuch, perhaps during the wanderings in the wilderness. Nothing else is known about it, and it survives only in Moses’ quotation."[1]
  7. ^ Numbers 21:14
  8. ^ 1 Kings 14:19,29
  9. ^ 1 Kings 16:20
  10. ^ Results for the text search
  11. ^ 2 Chronicles 9:29, 2 Chronicles 12:15, 2 Chronicles 13:22
  12. ^ 1 Samuel 10:25
  13. ^ Also called The Book of the Acts of Solomon Archived 2006-06-23 at the Wayback Machine
  14. ^ 1 Kings 11:41
  15. ^ a b c d [2]
  16. ^ 1 Chronicles 27:24
  17. ^ a b c "Are There Lost Books of the Bible?". December 2003.
  18. ^ 1 Chronicles 29:29
  19. ^ 2 Chronicles 9:29
  20. ^ [http://www.apologeticspress.org/articles/42>
  21. ^ 2 Chronicles 16:11
  22. ^ 2 Chronicles 27:7
  23. ^ a b 2 Chronicles 32:32
  24. ^ 2 Chronicles 20:34
  25. ^ 2 Chronicles 24:27
  26. ^ 2 Chronicles 26:22
  27. ^ "Lost Books of the Bible?". Archived from the original on 2006-06-23. Retrieved 2006-06-29.
  28. ^ 2 Chronicles 33:18
  29. ^ 2 Chronicles 33:19
  30. ^ 2 Chronicles 35:25
  31. ^ Esther 2:23
  32. ^ Esther 6:1
  33. ^ Esther 10:2
  34. ^ Nehemiah 12:23
  35. ^ Tobit 1:22
  36. ^ Tobit 2:10
  37. ^ Tobit 11:18
  38. ^ Tobit 14:10
  39. ^ a b c d e f g See footnote to the Biblical passage in The Jerusalem Bible, Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, 1966
  40. ^ Sirach 13:2–3
  41. ^ Rollston, Chris A. (April 2001). "Ben Sira 38:24–39:11 and The Egyptian Satire of the Trades". Journal of Biblical Literature. 120 (Spring): 131–139. doi:10.2307/3268597. JSTOR 3268597.
  42. ^ Sirach 38:24–39:11
  43. ^ 1 Maccabees 16:23–24
  44. ^ 2 Maccabees 2:1
  45. ^ 2 Maccabees 2:13
  46. ^ 2 Maccabees 2:23
  47. ^ 2 Maccabees 11:22
  48. ^ Ewert, David (1 July 1990). A General Introduction to the Bible: From Ancient Tablets to Modern Translations. Zondervan. ISBN 9780310453710 – via Google Books.
  49. ^ a b Holloway, Gary (1 January 1996). James & Jude. College Press. ISBN 9780899006383 – via Google Books.
  50. ^ Charlesworth, James H. (24 October 1985). The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament. CUP Archive. ISBN 9780521301909 – via Google Books.
  51. ^ Jerome, Commentarium ad Titum 100.1
  52. ^ The Ecclesiastical History of Socrates ... , London: George Bell, 1897. book III, chapter 16, verse 114, page 194. See also the introductory essay to Samson Agonistes by John Milton, Of that sort of Dramatic Poem which is call'd Tragedy Archived 2015-12-08 at the Wayback Machine.
  53. ^ Loeb Classical Library Euripides VIII, fragment 1024
  54. ^ 1 Corinthians 15:33
  55. ^ Titus 1–12:13
  56. ^ Acts 17:28
  57. ^ Jude 1:4
  58. ^ Jude 1:6
  59. ^ Jude 1:13
  60. ^ Jude 1:14–15
  61. ^ 2 Peter 2:4
  62. ^ 2 Peter 3:13
  63. ^ Witherington, Ben (9 January 2008). Letters and Homilies for Hellenized Christians: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on 1–2 Peter. InterVarsity Press. ISBN 9780830829330 – via Google Books.
  64. ^ Porter, Stanley E.; Pearson, Brook W. (19 December 2004). Christian-Jewish Relations Through the Centuries. A&C Black. ISBN 9780567041708 – via Google Books.
  65. ^ John 7:38
  66. ^ Book of Enoch (Ethopic Version), accessed 3 November 2018
  67. ^ a b 2 Timothy 3:8
  68. ^ Colossians 4:16
  69. ^ 2 Corinthians 11:14
  70. ^ 2 Corinthians 12:2
  71. ^ Martin, Ralph P. 2 Corinthians Word Biblical Commentary 40,
  72. ^ Jude 9
  73. ^ Hebrews 11:37
  74. ^ 1 Corinthians 5:9
  75. ^ Ephesians 3:3
  76. ^ Acts 24:5
  77. ^ 1 Corinthians 15:45
  78. ^ Genesis 2:7
  79. ^ 1 Corinthians 2:9
  80. ^ "1 Corinthians 2:9 Commentaries: but just as it is written, "THINGS WHICH EYE HAS NOT SEEN AND EAR HAS NOT HEARD, AND which HAVE NOT ENTERED THE HEART OF MAN, ALL THAT GOD HAS PREPARED FOR THOSE WHO LOVE HIM."". biblehub.com.
  81. ^ Isaiah 64:4
  82. ^ Luke 24:46
  83. ^ Hosea 6:2
  84. ^ "Did Jesus Err when He Spoke of Prophecies about His Resurrection?". apologeticspress.org. 26 May 2004.
  85. ^ Mark 9:12