Villages of Guam
Guam-administracja.png
CategoryCounty equivalent
LocationGuam
Number19
Populations647 (Umatac) – 44,908 (Dededo)
Areas0.89 sq mi (2.3 km2) (Sinajana) – 35.61 sq mi (92.2 km2) (Yigo)
Government

The United States territory of Guam is divided into nineteen municipalities, called villages. Each village is governed by an elected mayor. Village populations range in size from under 1,000 to over 40,000. In the 2020 census, the total population of Guam was 153,836.[1] Each village is counted as a county equivalent by the United States Census Bureau for statistical purposes.[2]

History

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Many villages have rich histories reaching back thousands of years. Artifacts from ancient Chamorro settlements can be found in every village of Guam. When the Spanish Empire colonized the Marianas Islands as part of its Pacific possessions in the 16th and 17th centuries, the island was divided into separate districts with each district consisting of a parish with a village center governed by an alcalde, appointed by the island's governor.

In the 18th century, there were six parishes on Guam: Hagåtña, Hagat, Humåtak, Malesso', Inalåjan, and Pago.

Prior to Spanish colonization, Chamorro people regularly held village celebrations. After adopting Christianity, these celebrations became fiestas in honor of the patron saint of each village. Annual village fiestas are still held throughout the island every year.

The current division of Guam into municipalities took place in the 1920s under United States Navy Administration. Santa Rita was formerly Sumay, before the U.S. taking of that village after World War II.

List of villages

Village Region[3] Land area[4] Population[1] Population density (2020)
sq mi km2 2020 2010 per sq mi per km2
Agana Heights Central 1.03 2.67 3,673 3,808 3,566 1,377
Asan-Maina Central 5.69 14.74 2,011 2,137 353 136
Barrigada Central 8.50 22.01 7,956 8,875 936 361
Chalan Pago-Ordot Central 5.67 14.69 7,064 6,822 1,246 481
Dededo North 30.52 79.05 44,908 44,943 1,471 568
Hågat (formerly Agat) South 10.33 26.75 4,515 4,917 437 169
Hagåtña Central 0.95 2.46 943 1,051 993 383
Humåtak (formerly Umatac) South 6.25 16.19 647 782 104 40
Inalåhan (formerly Inarajan) South 18.74 48.54 2,317 2,273 124 48
Malesso (formerly Merizo) South 6.26 16.21 1,604 1,850 256 99
Mangilao Central 10.19 26.39 13,476 15,191 1,322 511
Mongmong-Toto-Maite Central 1.82 4.71 6,380 6,825 3,505 1,353
Piti Central 7.54 19.53 1,585 1,454 210 81
Sånta Rita-Sumai (formerly Santa Rita) South 16.26 42.11 6,470 6,084 398 154
Sinajana Central 0.89 2.31 2,611 2,592 2,934 1,133
Talo'fo'fo (formerly Talofofo) South 17.79 46.08 3,550 3,050 200 77
Tamuning (not including Tumon) North 5.65 14.63 18,489 19,685 3,272 1,263
Yigo North 35.61 92.23 19,339 20,539 543 210
Yona South 20.12 52.11 6,298 6,480 313 121
Guam 209.81 543.41 153,836 159,358 733 283

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Population of Guam: 2010 and 2020, U.S. Census Bureau.
  2. ^ "Geographic Levels". United States Census Bureau. Suitland, Maryland. September 12, 2016. Retrieved 31 December 2020.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-10-31. Retrieved 2007-12-31.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ Population, Housing Units, Land Area, and Density by Municipality for Guam: 2010, U.S. Census Bureau.