Wahiduddin Khan
Maulanawahiduddin.jpg
Born(1925-01-01)1 January 1925
Azamgarh, Uttar Pradesh, British India
Died21 April 2021(2021-04-21) (aged 96)
New Delhi, Delhi, India
Resting placePanjpeeran Qabristan, near Basti Hazrat Nizamuddin, New Delhi
OccupationIslamic Scholar, Islamic Spiritual Leader, Speaker and Author
LanguageUrdu, English, Hindi, Punjabi
NationalityIndian
CitizenshipIndia
GenreIslamic literature
Notable worksTazkirul Quran
Notable awardsPadma Vibhushan
SpouseSabi'a Khatoon
ChildrenShamsul Islam (d)
Zafarul Islam Khan
Ummus Salam (d)
Prof. Farida Khanam (scholar)
Dr. Muslema Siddiqui
Bintul Islam (d)
Saniyasnain Khan
Website
www.maulanawahiduddinkhan.com

Wahiduddin Khan (1 January 1925 – 21 April 2021), known with the honorific "Maulana", was an Indian Islamic scholar and peace activist and author known for having written a commentary on the Quran and having translated it into contemporary English.[1][2] He was listed in "the 500 Most Influential Muslims" of the world.[3][4] He was also the founder of the Centre for Peace and Spirituality (CPS).[5] In 1993, he asked the Muslims to relinquish claims over Babri Masjid site.[6] Khan had also embarked on a peace march through Maharashtra along with Sushil Kumar (Jain monk) and Chidanand Saraswati post the demolition of the Babri Masjid. Khan wrote over 200 books on several aspects of Islam and established the Centre for Peace and Spirituality to promote interfaith dialogue.[5]

Khan received the Demiurgus Peace International Award, and India's third-highest civilian honour, the Padma Bhushan, in January 2000;[7] the National Citizens' Award, presented by Mother Teresa and the Rajiv Gandhi National Sadbhavana Award (2009).[8] He was awarded the Padma Vibhushan, India's second-highest civilian honour, in January 2021.[9] He died in Delhi from COVID-19 complications in April 2021 at the age of 96.[10]

Early life and education

Khan was born a family of Pathan landlords in Village Badharia, in district Azamgarh, Uttar Pradesh, India in 1925.[11] Khan lost his father at the age of four and was raised by his mother Zaibunnisa [12] and his uncle, Sufi Abdul Hamid Khan. He received his education at a traditional seminary, Madrastaul Islahi, in Sarai Mir (Azamgarh) in 1938.[13][14] Khan spent six years completing his alim course and graduated in 1944.[citation needed]

He was also a member of the central Majlis-e-Shura of Jamaat-e-Islami, but due to ideological differences, he withdrew from the party in 1963 and published his critique under the name of Tabir Ki Ghalti (Error Of Interpretation). He was married to Sabi'a Khatoon.[citation needed]

Mission

Khan launched the 'Maulana Wahiduddin Khan Peace Foundation.' [15] Khan was among the few Indian scholars to have seriously taken the issue of pluralism and inter-community relations. Khan insisted that Muslims must shed what he called their 'persecution complex'. He insisted on searching for opportunities that exist despite the odds that seem to weigh heavily against them and work along with people of other faiths for building a new society. Khan quoted the Quran as saying: "No one despairs of God's mercy except those who have no faith."[citation needed]

Condemnation of Violence

Wahiduddin's conception of nonviolence is perhaps best articulated in his treatise, Islam and Peace. Growing up at the height of India's independence movement, Wahiduddin held great admiration for Mohandas Gandhi and expressed his sentiments in his book.[citation needed]

Jamaat-e Islami

His commitment to the Jamaat and his skillful pen helped him move up the Jama'at's hierarchy. He was appointed, in a few years after, as a member of its Central Committee. He even wrote regularly for the Jama'at's Urdu journal. Khan did not remain for long with the Jama'at, though. Increasingly, it suggested to him that the Jama'at's own agenda, based as it was on working towards establishing what is called an 'Islamic State' in India, was not only impractical but, moreover, not in keeping with what Islam expected of the Muslims of India in the situation that they found themselves. So, he gradually came to the conclusion that the Jama'at-e Islami's political approach was ill-suited to the needs and conditions of the Muslim minority in India. He began airing his differences with the Jama'at's ideology and policies even while still a senior leader of the Jama'at, but as these differences began to grow, he decided to quit the organization after serving it for ten years, in 1962.[10]

Works

Khan founded the Quran Foundation (under the aegis of CPS International) on April 2, 2015. The aim of the foundation was to translate and disseminate copies of the Quran and Islamic material globally by promoting religious understanding amongst people to reveal 'as it is’ as a religion of peace.[3]

He established the Islamic Centre in New Delhi in 1970.[16][17][18] In 2001, Khan established the 'Centre for Peace and Spirituality’.[12][17][19][20][3]

Thoughts and Ideology

Islam an ideology of peace

In his book The Ideology of Peace, Khan writes that history abounds with preachers of peace . He says that in centuries no revolution in the true sense of the word has been brought about based on peace. He writes that for peace, the human need is not enough to make him exercise restraint and remain peaceable. Man needs an ideology that convinces him at the conscious level of the necessity to keep the peace at all times. According to Khan, this ideology is the one presented in Islam.[21]

Hudaybiya Model: Peace, Not Justice

In his book The Prophet of Peace, Khan writes that the greatest fallacy entertained by people of a militant cast of minds is that they think true peace is accompanied by justice. Khan objects to the mentality of “peace without justice is no peace at all.” Khan says that the life of the Prophet of Islam provides a telling example of this wisdom. Khan argues that the Hudaybiya treaty was a biased and unjust peace treaty based on it it’s terms. However, the Prophet of Islam (Muhammad) considered it due to a 10-year no-war pact. It took the form of a written pledge from his opponents that they would not initiate any hostilities against him and that they would let him and his followers live in peace in Madinah. According to Khan, the acceptance of the Hudaybiyah treaty resulted into the success of the Prophet’s mission. Khan writes that justice can only be within discussion after peace is exercised. He writes, “Asking for justice before peace is like placing the cart before the horse.”[22]

Islam and Politics

Khan disagrees with many of Jamal al-Din al-Afghani ideas. Khan argues that al-Afghani made the notion of a political revolution into a religious duty, a binding obligation, like prayers and fasting. Discrediting the religious credentials of political Islam, Khan writes: "The movement was the result of anti-Western rather than pro-Islam feelings."[23]

Refuting Political Interpretation of Islam

In time Wahiduddin emerged as a critic of Maududi's Islamist ideas, which he saw as reactionary rather than authentically Islamic. From Khan's perspective, Maududi was treating politics as the center of Islamic activity, when tawhid (the oneness of God) is the actual heart of Islam, and the call to tawhid (Dawah) should be the center of all Islamic activity. His concern has been to demolish the political interpretation of Islam.[citation needed]

He claims that communal Muslim beliefs and practices are in opposition to authentic Islam by citing the Quran as saying that God "is the Lord of the Worlds" and that the Prophet Muhammad is "a mercy to all mankind." Khan's position is that these Quranic references show that God and the Prophet Muhammad are not significant for Muslims only. Hence, looking for the benefit of the Muslim community both in general and specifically through the building of an Islamic state is not the message of the Quran.  Instead, the Quranic message and the example of the Prophet Muhammad are for everybody and belong to everyone, not only to the Muslims.[24]

Accepting "political status quo-ism"

Khan says that the correct attitude towards politics in Islam is "political status quo-ism." Khan says that with political confrontation all time and energy will be spent fighting rivals instead of achieving something more productive. Instead, Khan thinks that Islam teaches that: "Politics is not the only important field of human activity. There are many other vital spheres of work, like education, business, industry, social reform, academic learning, scientific research etc." Hence, the principle of "political status quo-ism" means the opposite to a politics of change, or at least radical change or revolution. Another principle is the avoidance of "political movements" and, instead, a pragmatic focus on education, science, and business.[23]

Arguments Against Suicide Bombings

Khan denounced martyrdom operations as, according to Islam, people can become martyrs, but they cannot court a martyr's death deliberately. He supports his own position on the debate with Surah Al-Anfal (eight chapter of the Quran). In Khan's commentary, he elaborates that the Surah only shows the responsibility to prepare military deterrent defenses as a "demonstration of force." In Khan's words, "the verse offers us a peaceful strategy to counter the enemy." For this reason, he thinks that the Surah only means building a strong defense to deter warfare and attacks.[25]

Existence of God

Khan believed that there is certainly a scientific basis for belief in the existence of God. But people generally fail to discover it for the simple reason that they try to apply a criterion that they wrongly believe to be scientific. They want a proof in terms of observation, whereas this is neither the scientific method nor the criterion by which to judge. He argues in his book ‘God Arises’ that if one applies the right criterion, they will find that God is a proven fact.[26]

Theme of the Quran: Tadabbur, Tafakkur, Tawassum

According to Khan, the main themes of the Quran are enlightenment, closeness to God, peace and spirituality. The Quran uses several terms, tawassum, tadabbur, and tafakkur, which indicate the learning of lessons through reflection, thinking and contemplation on the signs of God scattered across the world.[27]

Tazkiyah: Re-engineering of Minds towards Peace and Spirituality

Khan says that people are born spiritual but the multiple influences from society condition a man’s personality or nurture one based on negative feelings. Khan says, we, therefore, have to consciously activate our mind and de-condition or purify it so as to develop our personality on positive lines as only a positive personality will find entry into paradise.[citation needed]

Khan has laid great emphasis on ‘tazkiyah’ which he has described as “an awakening of the mind or purification or deconditioning that leads to our personality development”.[28]

Muslims and Scientific, Secular Education

In his paper titled "Muslims and the Scientific Education", Khan addresses the negative perception that Islam discourages Muslims from acquiring scientific education or does nothing to encourage it.[citation needed]

Khan argues that innumerable verses from the Quran and many sayings of the Prophet can be quoted which explicitly urge their readers to delve deeper into the mysteries of the earth and the heavens.[citation needed]

For Khan “making a study of nature is to discover the Creator in His creation”. Khan quotes Muslim history to contradict the supposition that Islam is an obstacle to scientific investigation.[citation needed]

He quotes some achievements of Muslim scientists and doctors in the Middle Ages which he says were indeed surprising because of their tremendous scope.[29]

Pro-Self Activism and Anti-Self Activism

In his article titled, “Pro-Self Activism, Anti-Self Activism”, Khan writes that in the present age of professionalism, having a profession means living for others.[citation needed]

Khan explains that people live for others and hardly know their own self, for example,  film actors live for their audiences, businessmen for their customers, lawyers for their clients, politicians for their voters, employees for their company bosses, and so on.[citation needed]

This is why Khan says that so many people have become non-self actors which is a great loss for a person, as people almost always remain unaware of themselves. People frequently evaluate themselves according to others’ perceptions and not their own and are unable to unfold their real potential, and finally die in this state of unawareness, writes Khan.[citation needed]

If people are judged on this basis, they can be put into three categories: anti-self activists, non-self activists, and pro-self activists. All persons fall into one or other of these categories, writes Khan.[citation needed]

Khan concludes with, “People who belong to this pro-self activists category are human beings in the true sense. They make their plans according to the divine scheme of things. They turn their potential into actuality and thus develop themselves.”[30]

Religion and Scientific Reasoning

In his book ‘Religion and Science’, Khan argues that in the case of scientific truths, the validity of indirect or inferential argument is a matter of general acceptance. Since religious truths are proved by the logic of similar inferential arguments, it may legitimately be argued that they fall into the same intellectual bracket as scientific truths. As science proves any other facts, Wahiduddin Khan claims to prove the truth about religion in his books.[31]

Publications

The Ar-risala (The Message) Urdu magazine started in 1976, consisting of almost entirely his articles and writing. An English edition of the magazine started in February 1984 and a Hindi version started in December 1990. His articles include 'Hijacking — A Crime',[32] 'Rights of Women in Islam',[33] 'The Concept of Charity in Islam'[34] and 'The Concept of Jihad'.[35]

List of selected works

Signature of Maulana Wahiduddin Khan
Signature of Maulana Wahiduddin Khan

He "has authored over 200 books on Islam, inter-faith dialogue, social harmony, freedom of speech, prophetic wisdom, spirituality and coexistence in a multi-ethnic society" as well on Islam's relations with modernity and secularism.:[36][37][38][39] Khan published his first book in 1955, which is Naye Ahd Ke Darwaze Par (On the Threshold of a New Era). His next work, Ilme Jadid Ka Challenge (Islam and Modern Challenges) was later published as God Arises.

His book Al Islam has been published in English as The Vision of Islam. In it, he presents the interpretation of the Islamic Scriptures in the modern idiom based on peace and spirituality.[citation needed]

Tazkirul Quran

Khan translated the Quran in the modern scientific idiom. He translated the Quran in Urdu along with the commentary entitled Tazkirul Quran. The book is available in Hindi (Pavitra Quran) and Arabic (Al Tazkirul Qaweem fi Tafseeril Quran il Hakeem).

Kitab-e-Marefat

Khan has presented the counter ideology—an ideology of peace—in articles and books such as The Ideology of Peace, The True Jihad, Islam and Peace, The Prophet of Peace: Teachings of The Prophet Muhammad published by Penguin Books, Islam and World Peace and Political Interpretation of Islam. He explains the depths of God realization in his book, Kitab-e-Marefat.[citation needed]

Translation of Quran

Khan with his team translated the Quran and commentary into English, which is published under the title, 'The Quran.' [12][18][40]

"Simple and direct, the book being extremely readable reaches out to a large audience, Muslims as well as non-Muslim … ."— Review of The Quran (English) by the Speaking Tree, Times of India, May 16, 2010[citation needed]

Besides English and Urdu, its translations are now available in Braille (English), German, Spanish, French, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, and Malayalam and commentary in Arabic, Hindi, Telugu, and Marathi. Efforts are on to translate it into all International and Indian languages. He is the co-founder of Goodword books, a popular publisher of books on Islam.[citation needed]

Bibliography

English Books

Urdu Books

Hindi Books

Punjabi Books

Awards and recognition

Death

Grave of Maulana Wahiduddin Khan
Grave of Maulana Wahiduddin Khan

Wahiduddin Khan, died on 21 April 2021, ten days after he was admitted to Apollo Hospital in Delhi after he tested positive for coronavirus infection at the age of 96.[135] He was buried at Panjpeeran Qabristan near Basti Hazrat Nizamuddin, New Delhi.[citation needed]

He is survived by two sons and two daughters.[14] His son Zafar ul Islam is the former Chairman of the Delhi Minorities Commission.[12][121][136] His other son, Saniyasnain Khan is also a children's book author. His daughter, Farida Khanum, is the translator of most of his books and is the chairperson of Centre for Peace and Spirituality.[137]

See also

References

  1. ^ "All Muslim sects should agree to disagree: Maulana Wahiduddin Khan | Indian Muslims". Archived from the original on 15 May 2010. Retrieved 17 August 2009.
  2. ^ A new translation of the Quran by Maulana Wahiduddin Khan. goodword.net. Archived 3 January 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ a b c "The Muslim 500: Wahiduddin-Khan". Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  4. ^ "Times of India on 22 most influential Muslims in India". The Times of India. Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Maulana Wahiduddin Khan dies". The Indian Express. 22 April 2021. Retrieved 27 February 2022.
  6. ^ "Maulana Wahiduddin Khan: The advocate of religious harmony who told Muslims to relinquish Babri claims".
  7. ^ Tamara Sonn & Mary Williamsburg, (2004), A Brief History of Islam, Blackwell. ISBN 1-4051-0902-5.
  8. ^ "Muslim scholar gets Sadhbhavana Award". Sify.com. 20 August 2010. Archived from the original on 22 August 2010. Retrieved 6 August 2011.
  9. ^ "LIVE: Ram Vilas Paswan, Keshubhai Patel, Tarun Gogoi awarded Padham Bhushan". Hindustan Times. 25 January 2021. Retrieved 25 January 2021.
  10. ^ a b World renowned Islamic scholar Maulana Wahiduddin Khan passes away in Delhi
  11. ^ "Maulana Wahiduddin Khan". Archived from the original on 19 September 2008. Retrieved 30 September 2008.
  12. ^ a b c d "India's Islamic scholar Maulana Wahiduddin Khan dies of COVID-19". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 4 March 2022.
  13. ^ "Famed Islamic scholar Maulana Wahiduddin dead – India News". The Times of India. Retrieved 21 April 2021.
  14. ^ a b "Narendra Modi leads India tributes to Islamic scholar Maulana Wahiduddin Khan". The National. 22 April 2021. Retrieved 21 March 2022.
  15. ^ "A conversation with Islamic scholar Maulana Wahduddin Khan". www.indcatholicnews.com. Retrieved 22 March 2022.
  16. ^ a b c "Maulana Wahiduddin Khan was an Islamic scholar who believed in dialogue". The Indian Express. 23 April 2021. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  17. ^ a b c d "In Maulana Wahiduddin Khan, India loses an advocate of inter-religious harmony to Covid-19". ThePrint. 22 April 2021. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  18. ^ a b c "'حق کی تلاش' پر زور دینے والے عالم مولانا وحید الدین کون تھے؟". BBC News اردو (in Urdu). Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  19. ^ "A Tribute To Maulana Wahiduddin Khan". www.outlookindia.com. Retrieved 22 March 2022.
  20. ^ KO. "Maulana Wahiduddin Khan: A Life Devoted To Fostering Trust & Goodwill". Kashmir Observer. Retrieved 22 March 2022.
  21. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (2015). The Ideology of Peace: Towards a Culture of Peace. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-129-1.
  22. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (3 December 2009). The Prophet of Peace: Teachings of the Prophet Muhammad. Penguin UK. p. 118. ISBN 978-93-5118-775-2.
  23. ^ a b Dahlkvist, Mattias (2019). The Politics of Islam, Non-violence, and Peace: The Thought of Maulana Wahiduddin Khan in Context. Umeå universitet. p. 291. ISBN 978-91-7855-145-3.
  24. ^ Dahlkvist, Mattias (2019). The Politics of Islam, Non-violence, and Peace: The Thought of Maulana Wahiduddin Khan in Context. Umeå universitet. p. 185. ISBN 978-91-7855-145-3.
  25. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (3 December 2009). The Prophet of Peace: Teachings of the Prophet Muhammad. Penguin UK. p. 92. ISBN 978-93-5118-775-2.
  26. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (11 January 2014). God Arises Evidence of God in Nature and in Science (Goodword). Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-894-8.
  27. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (19 December 2013). Quran: A Simple English Translation (Goodword ! Koran) Chapter Introduction. Goodword Books.
  28. ^ Dahlkvist, Mattias (2019). The Politics of Islam, Non-violence, and Peace: The Thought of Maulana Wahiduddin Khan in Context. Umeå universitet. pp. 215–216. ISBN 978-91-7855-145-3.
  29. ^ "Muslims and the Scientific Education | CPS International". www.cpsglobal.org. Retrieved 23 March 2022.
  30. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (2015). The Age of Peace (PDF). Goodword Book. p. 149.
  31. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1988). Religion and Science. Maktaba al-Risala. ISBN 978-81-85063-19-5.
  32. ^ "Hijacking – A Crime". Archived from the original on 17 August 2009. Retrieved 17 August 2009.
  33. ^ "Rights of Women in Islam". Archived from the original on 14 February 2009. Retrieved 17 August 2009.
  34. ^ "The Concept of Charity in Islam". Archived from the original on 19 November 2008. Retrieved 17 August 2009.
  35. ^ "The Concept of Jihad". Archived from the original on 18 August 2009. Retrieved 17 August 2009.
  36. ^ "Books by Maulana Wahiduddin Khan | CPS International". cpsglobal.org. Retrieved 24 March 2022.
  37. ^ Profile on The Muslim 500
  38. ^ a b "Renowned Islamic scholar Maulana Wahiduddin Khan in ICU after testing positive for Covid". ThePrint. 13 April 2021. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  39. ^ "Maulana Wahiduddin Khan – 17 products available". Archived from the original on 25 October 2007. Retrieved 17 August 2009.
  40. ^ a b "Wahiduddin Khan". The Muslim 500. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  41. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1 January 2000). A Case Of Discovery. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-039-3.
  42. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (24 June 2021). A Treasury of the Quran. goodword. ISBN 978-81-85063-11-9.
  43. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (27 January 2015). About the Quran (Goodword). Goodword Books.
  44. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (27 January 2015). Calling People to God (Goodword). Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-938-9.
  45. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1 January 2001). Concerning Divorce. Goodword Books Pvt. Limited. ISBN 978-81-87570-35-6.
  46. ^ Discovering God | CPS International. cpsglobal.org. ISBN 9789386589637. Retrieved 25 March 2022.
  47. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (28 February 2014). Explore Islam (Goodword). Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-940-2.
  48. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (11 January 2014). God Arises Evidence of God in Nature and in Science (Goodword). Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-894-8.
  49. ^ Wahiduddin, Khan Maulana (1995). Hijab in Islam. Islamic Centre. ISBN 978-81-85063-77-5.
  50. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (2003). In Search Of God. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-291-5.
  51. ^ Khan, Waḥīduddīn (1994). Indian Muslims: The Need for a Positive Outlook. Al-Risala Books. ISBN 978-81-85063-80-5.
  52. ^ k̲h̲Ān̲, Vaḥīduddīn (1999). Introducing Islam | CPS International. www.cpsglobal.org. ISBN 9788187570585. Retrieved 25 March 2022.
  53. ^ a b Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin; K̲h̲ān̲, Vaḥīduddīn (2004). Islam and Peace. goodword. ISBN 978-81-87570-28-8.
  54. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1998). Islam and the Modern Man. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-85063-98-0.
  55. ^ a b Khan, Wahiduddin (22 June 2021). Islam and World Peace. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-93-5179-032-7.
  56. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1992). Islam As It Is. goodword. ISBN 978-81-87570-66-0.
  57. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1 January 1998). Islam In History. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-037-9.
  58. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (3 March 2014). Islam Pocket Guide (Goodword). Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-990-7.
  59. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin; K̲h̲ān̲, Vaḥīduddīn (2002). Islam Rediscovered: Discovering Islam from Its Original Sources. goodword. ISBN 978-81-87570-40-0.
  60. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1 January 1999). Islam Stands The Test Of History. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-035-5.
  61. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (25 September 2021). Islam: Creator of the Modern Age. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-87570-30-1.
  62. ^ Khan, Waḥīduddīn (2010). Jihad, Peace, and Inter-community Relations in Islam. Rupa & Company. ISBN 978-81-291-1585-0.
  63. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (25 September 2021). Leading-a-Spiritual-Life. Harpercollins 360. ISBN 978-93-5179-151-5.
  64. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (28 September 2021). Life-Death-and-Beyond. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-93-89766-23-3.
  65. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (27 January 2015). Man and God (Goodword). Goodword Books.
  66. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1 January 2000). Man Know Thyself. Goodword Books Pvt. Limited. ISBN 978-81-87570-32-5.
  67. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (27 January 2015). Man Made Global Warming (Goodword). Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-984-6.
  68. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (2002). Manifesto Of Peace. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-042-3.
  69. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (February 2000). The Moral Vision. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-87570-01-1.
  70. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (2000). Muhammad: The Ideal Character. Goodword Books Pvt. Limited. ISBN 978-81-87570-33-2.
  71. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (2001). Muhammad: A Prophet for All Humanity. goodword. ISBN 978-81-85063-84-3.
  72. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1998). Non-Violence And Islam. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-030-0.
  73. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (22 September 2021). Non-violence-and-peace-building. Harpercollins 360. ISBN 978-93-5179-158-4.
  74. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (27 January 2015). Peace in Islam (Goodword). Goodword Books.
  75. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (3 August 2021). Peace in Kashmir. BLURB Incorporated. ISBN 978-1-006-65773-3.
  76. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (27 January 2015). Peace in the Quran (Goodword). Goodword Books.
  77. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1 July 2006). Polygamy and Islam. Goodword Books Pvt. Limited. ISBN 978-81-87570-34-9.
  78. ^ Khan, Waḥīduddīn (2000). Principles of Islam. goodword. ISBN 978-81-85063-36-2.
  79. ^ a b Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (2002). The Prophet Muhammad: A Simple Guide to His Life. goodword. ISBN 978-81-7898-094-2.
  80. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (24 February 2014). Quran Pocket Guide (Goodword). Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-991-4.
  81. ^ Khan (Translator), Maulana Wahiduddin (19 December 2013). Quran: A Simple English Translation (Goodword ! Koran). Goodword Books. ((cite book)): |last= has generic name (help)
  82. ^ Quran Teachings Made Simple. ISBN 9788178987484.
  83. ^ Quranic Wisdom | CPS International. cpsglobal.org. ISBN 9789351790518. Retrieved 25 March 2022.
  84. ^ Ramadan Made Simple. ISBN 9788178987972.
  85. ^ Khan, Waḥīduddīn (1988). Religion and Science. Maktaba al-Risala. ISBN 978-81-85063-19-5.
  86. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1 January 2001). Search For Truth. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-026-3.
  87. ^ Khan, Waḥīduddīn (2005). Simple Wisdom: A Daybok of Spiritual Living. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-110-9.
  88. ^ K̲h̲ān̲, Vaḥīduddīn (1986). Tabligh Movement. Islamic Centre. ISBN 978-81-85063-15-7.
  89. ^ Tazkiyah Purification of the Soul | CPS International. www.cpsglobal.org. ISBN 9788178988177. Retrieved 25 March 2022.
  90. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (27 January 2015). The Alarm of Doomsday (Goodword). Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-7898-939-6.
  91. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (March 2000). The Call of the Quran. Goodword Books Pvt. Limited. ISBN 978-81-87570-03-5.
  92. ^ Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin (1996). The Garden of Paradise. Goodword Books. ISBN 978-81-85063-05-8.
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