← 20 21 22 →
Cardinaltwenty-one
Ordinal21st
(twenty-first)
Factorization3 × 7
Divisors1, 3, 7, 21
Greek numeralΚΑ´
Roman numeralXXI
Binary101012
Ternary2103
Senary336
Octal258
Duodecimal1912
Hexadecimal1516

21 (twenty-one) is the natural number following 20 and preceding 22.

The current century is the 21st century AD, under the Gregorian calendar.

In mathematics

Twenty-one is the fifth distinct semiprime,[1] and the second of the form where is a higher prime.[2]

As a biprime with proper divisors 1, 3 and 7, twenty-one has a prime aliquot sum of 11 within an aliquot sequence containing only one composite number (21, 11, 1, 0); it is the second composite member of the 11-aliquot tree, following 18. 21 is the first member of the second cluster of two discrete semiprimes (21, 22), where the next such cluster is (38, 39). 21 is the smallest natural number that is not close to a power of two , where the range of nearness is . 21 is a Harshad number in base ten,[3] and a repdigit in quaternary (1114).

While 21 is the sixth triangular number,[4] it is also the sum of the divisors of the first five positive integers:

21 is the fifth Motzkin number,[5] and the eighth Fibonacci number, equal to the sum of the preceding terms in the sequence, 8 and 13. It is the smallest non-trivial example in decimal of a Fibonacci number whose digits are Fibonacci numbers and whose digit sum is also a Fibonacci number.[6] It is also an octagonal number,[7] and a Padovan number (preceded by the terms (9, 12, 16), where it is the sum of the first two of these).[8] 21 is a Blum integer, since it is a semiprime with both its prime factors being Gaussian primes.[9]

While the twenty-first prime number 73 is the largest member of Bhargava's definite quadratic 17–integer matrix representative of all prime numbers,[10]

the twenty-first composite number 33 is the largest member of a like definite quadratic 9–integer matrix[11]

representative of all odd numbers.[12][a]

21 is also the largest positive integer that has the following property (see brief proof below):

For any positive integers such that , at least one of and is a terminating decimal.

Note that a necessary condition for is that for any coprime to and must satisfy the condition above, therefore at least one of and must only have factor 2 and 5.

Let denote the quantity of the numbers smaller than that only have factor 2 and 5 and that are coprime to , we instantly have .

We can easily see that for sufficiently large , , but , as goes to infinity, thus fails to hold for sufficiently large .

In fact, for every , we have

and

,

so fails to hold when (actually, when ).

Just check a few numbers to see that the complete sequence of numbers having this property is: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 15, 21.

Twenty-one is the smallest number of differently sized squares needed to square the square.[13]

21 is the number of prime numbers have two digits.[14]

In science

Age 21

In sports

In other fields

See also: List of highways numbered 21

Building called "21" in Zlín, Czech Republic
Detail of the building entrance

21 is:

References

  1. ^ On the other hand, the largest member of an integer quadratic matrix representative of all numbers is 15,
    where the aliquot sum of 33 is 15, the second such number to have this sum after 16 (A001065); see also, 15 and 290 theorems.
  1. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001358". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  2. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001748". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  3. ^ "Sloane's A005349 : Niven (or Harshad) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  4. ^ "Sloane's A000217 : Triangular numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  5. ^ "Sloane's A001006 : Motzkin numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  6. ^ "Sloane's A000045 : Fibonacci numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  7. ^ "Sloane's A000567 : Octagonal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  8. ^ "Sloane's A000931 : Padovan sequence". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  9. ^ "Sloane's A016105 : Blum integers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  10. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A154363 (Numbers from Bhargava's prime-universality criterion theorem)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2023-10-13.
  11. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A116582 (Numbers from Bhargava's 33 theorem.)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2023-10-09.
  12. ^ Cohen, Henri (2007). "Consequences of the Hasse–Minkowski Theorem". Number Theory Volume I: Tools and Diophantine Equations. Graduate Texts in Mathematics. Vol. 239 (1st ed.). Springer. pp. 312–314. ISBN 978-0-387-49922-2. OCLC 493636622. Zbl 1119.11001.
  13. ^ C. J. Bouwkamp, and A. J. W. Duijvestijn, "Catalogue of Simple Perfect Squared Squares of Orders 21 Through 25." Eindhoven University of Technology, Nov. 1992.
  14. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006879 (Number of primes with n digits.)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.