← 136 137 138 →
Cardinalone hundred thirty-seven
Ordinal137th
(one hundred thirty-seventh)
Factorizationprime
Prime33rd
Divisors1, 137
Greek numeralΡΛΖ´
Roman numeralCXXXVII
Binary100010012
Ternary120023
Octal2118
DuodecimalB512
Hexadecimal8916

137 (one hundred [and] thirty-seven) is the natural number following 136 and preceding 138.

In mathematics

137 is:

Using two radii to divide a circle according to the golden ratio yields sectors of approximately 137° (the golden angle) and 222°.
1/137 = 0.00729927007299270072992700..., its period value is palindromic and has a period length of only 8. 1/137 was once believed to be the exact value of the fine-structure constant.

In physics

In esoterism

In the military

In music

In religion

In transportation

In other fields

See also

Notes

  1. ^ There is a most profound and beautiful question associated with the observed coupling constant, e, the amplitude for a real electron to emit or absorb a real photon. It is a simple number that has been experimentally determined to be close to −0.08542455. (My physicist friends won't recognize this number, because they like to remember it as the inverse of its square: about 137.03597 with about an uncertainty of about 2 in the last decimal place. It has been a mystery ever since it was discovered more than fifty years ago, and all good theoretical physicists put this number up on their wall and worry about it.) Immediately you would like to know where this number for a coupling comes from: is it related to p or perhaps to the base of natural logarithms? Nobody knows. It's one of the greatest damn mysteries of physics: a magic number that comes to us with no understanding by man. You might say the "hand of God" wrote that number, and "we don't know how He pushed his pencil". We know what kind of a dance to do experimentally to measure this number very accurately, but we don't know what kind of dance to do on the computer to make this number come out, without putting it in secretly! — R. P. Feynman, QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter

References

  1. ^ "Sloane's A042978 : Stern primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-27.
  2. ^ "Sloane's A002144 : Pythagorean primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-27.
  3. ^ "Sloane's A016038 : Strictly non-palindromic numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-27.
  4. ^ "Sloane's A072857 : Primeval numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-27.
  5. ^ Rutland, G., Awesome Sovereign (Bloomington: AuthorHouse, 2016), p. 33.
  6. ^ Richard Feynman website, "The Mysterious 137".
  7. ^ Eddington, A. S., The Constants of Nature in "The World of Mathematics", Vol. 2 (1956) Ed. Newman, J. R., Simon and Schuster, pp. 1074-1093.
  8. ^ Helge Kragh, "Magic Number: A Partial History of the Fine-Structure Constant", Archive for History of Exact Sciences 57:5:395 (July, 2003) doi:10.1007/s00407-002-0065-7
  9. ^ Lederman, L. M., The God Particle: If the Universe is the Answer, What is the Question? (1993), Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, pp. 28–29.
  10. ^ The mystery of 137, www.integralworld.net.
  11. ^ Planck Collaboration (2016). "Planck 2015 results. XIII. Cosmological parameters (See PDF, page 32, Table 4, Age/Gyr, last column)". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 594: A13. arXiv:1502.01589. Bibcode:2016A&A...594A..13P. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201525830. S2CID 119262962.
  12. ^ Lawrence, C. R. (18 March 2015). "Planck 2015 Results" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-11-24. Retrieved 27 April 2017.
  13. ^ Ginsburgh, Rabbi Yitzchak (2006). What You Need to Know About Kabbalah (1st ed.). Jerusalem: Gal Einai Publications. p. 3. ISBN 978-965-7146-118.
  14. ^ Ginsburgh, Rabbi Yitzchak (2006). What You Need to Know About Kabbalah (1st ed.). Jerusalem: Gal Einai Publications. p. 3. ISBN 978-965-7146-118.
  15. ^ Genesis 25:17
  16. ^ Exodus 6:16
  17. ^ Exodus 6:20