Chesquerque gameboard and starting position. In the diagram, archbishops are represented by knight and bishop combined.
Chesquerque gameboard and starting position. In the diagram, archbishops are represented by knight and bishop combined.

Chesquerque is a chess variant invented by George R. Dekle Sr. in 1986.[1][2] The game is played on a board composed of four Alquerque boards combined into a square. Like Alquerque, pieces are positioned on points of intersection and make their moves along marked lines (similarly to xiangqi); as such, the board comprises a 9×9 grid with 81 positions (points) that pieces can move to.

Chesquerque was included in World Game Review No. 10 edited by Michael Keller.[3]

Game rules

The dimensions of the board are 9 rows by 9 columns. All the standard chess pieces are present, plus one additional pawn and one archbishop fairy piece per side. The pieces move in ways specially adapted to the Alquerque-gridded board; these moves differ slightly from those in regular chess.[4]

The starting setup is shown above. Like in standard chess, White moves first and the objective of the game is to checkmate the opponent's king. Other standard chess conventions also apply.

Piece moves

Each chesquerque piece has two different sets of possible valid moves, depending on whether said piece is standing on a point that has one or more diagonal connections ("with diagonals") or one that has no diagonal connections ("without diagonals"). In general pieces cannot move diagonally from points without diagonal markings.

Piece movements described using Betza's notation
Piece type On points without
diagonals
On points with
diagonals
King W KimsO3
Queen R RB
Rook R RF
Bishop W BW
Knight t[WF] t[FW]
Archbishop Wt[WF] BWt[FW]
Pawn fWimfnD mfWcefFimfnD
The white pawn on h6 can move one step straight forward (green dot), or capture diagonally forward (red dots). The pawn on b5 has no diagonal options; hence, it moves and captures one step forward (green–red dot). The same applies to White's pawns on f2 and c2 respectively; plus, those pawns have initial two-step options (furthest green dots). If Black's pawn on g8 advances, White can capture it en passant: 1... g6 2. hxg7e.p.. In the diagram, White has castled "archbishop-side" (0-0), while Black has castled queenside (0-0-0).
The white knight on c4 can move to any green dot, but cannot move to red dots near the rook, since the rook blocks those moves. The black knight on g7 is under attack and can retreat safely to any blue dot, but cannot move to red dots near the pawn, since the pawn blocks those moves.
The white rook on c3 can move one step diagonally (green dots) in addition to moving on orthogonal lines (e.g., it can capture the black bishop). The black rook on f7 has no diagonal step available, but can move on orthogonal lines (it can capture the white bishop). The white bishop on f3 has no diagonal moves, but can move one step orthogonally (blue dots). The black bishop on c7 can move one step orthogonally (blue dots) in addition to moving on diagonal lines (it can capture the white pawn on h2).

See also

Notes

  1. ^ This is the move of the dragon king in shogi.
  2. ^ A This is the move of the dragon horse in shogi.
  3. ^ This is the move of a horse in xiangqi.
  4. ^ This could be described as the "inverse" of the move of a horse in xiangqi.
  5. ^ This is the move of a pawn in standard chess.
  6. ^ This is the move of a pawn in shogi.

References

  1. ^ Pritchard (1994), p. 51
  2. ^ Pritchard (2007), p. 195
  3. ^ Keller, Michael, ed. (June 1991). "A Panorama of Chess Variants". World Game Review. No. 10. Michael Keller. ISSN 1041-0546.
  4. ^ "Chesquerque/Comments". The Chess Variant Pages. 2006-12-22. Retrieved 2012-08-13.

Bibliography