Christopher Priest
Christopher Priest by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Priest at the 2019 Phoenix Fan Fusion
BornJames Christopher Owsley
(1961-06-30) June 30, 1961 (age 61)
Queens, New York, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
Area(s)Writer, Editor
Pseudonym(s)Priest
AwardsInkpot Award (2016)[1]
digitalpriest.com

Christopher James Priest (born James Christopher Owsley June 30, 1961[2] in Queens, New York)[3] is an American writer of comic books who is at times credited simply as Priest. He changed his name legally circa 1993.[4] He was the first black writer-editor in mainstream comics.[5]

Comics writing

An urban Gospel song recorded by Priest in 1985 (then known as Jim Owsley). Although best known for comics writing, he has pursued music and Christian ministry for decades.

Priest (as Jim Owsley) entered the comics industry as a Marvel Comics intern in 1978.[6] He joined Marvel's editorial staff in 1979, working for Paul Laiken as a managing editor on Crazy Magazine[7] and becoming the first African American editor in mainstream comics.[8] He next became assistant editor for Larry Hama[9] on the Conan titles.[10]

Owsley made his professional debut as a writer in 1983 with issue No. 1 of The Falcon miniseries[11] and was made full editor of the Spider-Man comic books from 1985 to 1986.[7] Professional and personal disagreements eventually led to his leaving Marvel.[12] Owsley's writing tenure on Power Man and Iron Fist concluded with Iron Fist's controversial death.[13]

Moving to DC Comics, Owsley had a run as writer of Green Lantern when the character was exclusive to the anthology series Action Comics Weekly from 1988 to 1989. Owsley wrote the Green Lantern serial issues #601–607, left part way through a story arc and then returned for issues #621–635. He worked with artists Gil Kane and Tod Smith during his first run, and then upon his return, with artist M. D. Bright.[14] Owsley would write two Green Lantern Specials, the second issue concluding the plots left off from the end of Action Comics Weekly, with Bright drawing. They would work again on the first issue of Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn before Owsley departed. He edited several titles in DC Comics' Impact Comics imprint from 1991 to 1993.[7]

As a writer, Owsley/Priest worked on the series Conan the Barbarian, King Conan, The Ray, Steel, Deadpool, and Black Panther vol. 3.[15] He co-created the series Quantum and Woody, Xero, and The Crew, among others.[16]

In 1993, he became part of the group of writers and artists that launched Milestone Media, a comic book publisher affiliated with DC Comics. He has said he was intended to become the company's editor-in-chief, but personal problems forced him to scale down his involvement to liaison between DC and Milestone.[17]

Shortly afterward, he changed his name from "Jim Owsley" to "Christopher Priest" for reasons he has not discussed publicly other than in one remark in an interview about becoming a priest if his marriage, which later ended in divorce, did not last.[8] During Owsley's Green Lantern run, prior to his name change, he introduced a character named Priest. He has stated he was unaware of the British science fiction novelist Christopher Priest. He refers to himself professionally as either the mononym "Priest" or "Christopher J. Priest".[18]

After a decade-long absence from comics, he returned in 2014–2015 to write a Quantum and Woody miniseries for Valiant Comics.[19] He was chosen to write the DC Rebirth version of Deathstroke in 2016.[20] He became the writer for Justice League in December 2017, but was replaced by Scott Snyder in 2018. Priest contributed a story to the Black Panther Annual No. 1, released in February 2018.[21] In 2019 he was announced as the writer on Vampirella for Dynamite Comics[22][23] and U.S.Agent for Marvel Comics.[24]

Music

Priest is a singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist music producer who has written and produced dozens of tracks for himself and others.[25] Streetwise, Priest's first solo album, recorded under the stage name "Hollis Stone," was released on vinyl on March 3, 1981. It featured a cover photo by Eliot R. Brown of the then-Jim Owsley standing in front of the Marvel Comics office building at 575 Madison Avenue.[26]

In 1993, Priest co-produced Live! Minister Darryl Cherry and the Covenant Mass Choir (RWM-4445), a full concert multitrack recording featuring an 85-voice choir and 10-piece band including Priest playing bass guitar on two selections. The album was recorded before a live concert audience in New Brunswick, New Jersey.[27]

Personal life

Priest is an ordained Baptist minister,[8] and maintains an extensive archive of Progressive Christian ecumenical essays on his website PraiseNet.Org.[28] Priest resides in Denver, Colorado.[29]

Bibliography

Comics Work

Regular writer[edit]

  • Conan the Barbarian #172–185, 187–213 (Marvel Comics, July 1985 – December 1988) – (co-writer #202–213)
  • Conan the Barbarian King-Size Annual #8, 10–12 (Marvel Comics, 1983, 1985–1987)
  • Conan the King #50–55 (Marvel Comics, January 1989 – November 1989)
  • The Amazing Spider-Man #284–288 (Marvel Comics, January 1987 – May 1987)
  • Spider-Man vs. Wolverine No. 1 (Marvel Comics, February 1987) – (one-shot)
  • Action Comics Weekly #601–607 (DC Comics, May 24, 1988 – July 5, 1988) – (Green Lantern story)
  • Green Lantern Special #1–2 (DC Comics, 1988–1989)
  • "I, Whom the Gods Would Destroy." Marvel Graphic Novel No. 33 (Marvel Comics, 1988) – (Thor story)
  • Action Comics Weekly #621–635 (DC Comics, October 11, 1988 – January 17, 1989) – (Green Lantern story; co-writer)
  • The Unknown Soldier #1–12 (DC Comics, Winter 1988 – December 1989) – (limited series)
  • Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn No. 1 (DC Comics, January 1989) – (mini-series)
  • The Ray #1–28 (DC Comics, May 1994 – August 1996)
  • Justice League Task Force #18–37 (DC Comics, December 1994 – August 1996)
  • The Ray Annual No. 1 (DC Comics, 1995)
  • Triumph #1–4 (DC Comics, June 1995 – September 1995) – (mini-series)
  • Doom Link (DC Comics, 1995) – (Superman and Batman Elseworlds one-shot)
  • Hawkman #31–33 (DC Comics, April 1996 – June 1996)
  • Total Justice #1–3 (DC Comics, October 1996 – November 1996) – (mini-series)
  • Steel #34–52 (DC Comics, January 1997 – July 1998)
  • Wonder Woman Plus No. 1 (DC Comics, January 1997) – (with Jesse Quick; one-shot)
  • Xero #1–12 (DC Comics, May 1997 – April 1998)
  • Quantum and Woody #1–21 (Acclaim Comics, June 1997 – February 2000)
  • JLX Unleashed No. 1 (Marvel Comics, June 1997) – (one-shot)
  • Solar, Man of the Atom: Hell on Earth #1–4 (Acclaim Comics [Valiant], January 1998 – April 1998) – (limited series)
  • Concrete Jungle: The Legend of the Black Lion #1 (Acclaim Comics, April 1998) – (one-shot)
  • Ka-Zar #14–17 (Marvel Comics, June 1998 – September 1998)
  • GOAT: H.A.E.D.U.S. #1 (Acclaim Comics, August 1998) – (one-shot)
  • Wonder Woman #137–138, 1,000,000 (DC Comics, September 1998 – November 1998)
  • Black Panther vol. 3 #1–56, 59–62 (Marvel Comics, November 1998 – May 2003, July 2003 – September 2003)
  • Turok/Shadowman No. 1 (Acclaim Comics, February 1999) – (one-shot)
  • Impulse: Bart Saves the Universe No. 1 (DC Comics, March 1999) – (one-shot)
  • Deadpool #34–41, 43–45 (Marvel Comics, November 1999 – June 2000, August 2000 – October 2000)
  • Batman: The Hill No. 1 (DC Comics, May 2000) – (one-shot)
  • Legends of the DC Universe #30–32 (DC Comics, July 2000 – September 2000) – (Wonder Woman story)
  • The Crew #1–7 (Marvel Comics, July 2003 – January 2004)
  • Captain America and the Falcon #1–14 (Marvel Comics, May 2004 – June 2005)
  • Q2: The Return of Quantum and Woody #1–5 (Valiant Entertainment, October 2014 – February 2015)
  • Deathstroke vol. 4 #1–50 (DC Comics, August 2016 – December 2019)
  • Inhumans: Once and Future Kings #1–5 (Marvel Comics, August 2017 – October 2017)
  • Justice League vol. 3 #34–43 (DC Comics, December 2017 – April 2018)
  • Spider-Force #1–3 (Marvel Comics, October 2018 – December 2018)
  • Vampirella #1– (Dynamite Entertainment, July 2019 – )
  • U.S.Agent #1–5 (Marvel Comics, November 2020 – April 2021)


Fill-in writer[edit]

  • Marvel Team-Up No. 141 (Marvel Comics, May 1984)
  • Power Man and Iron Fist No. 108 (Marvel Comics, August 1984) – (co-writer)
  • Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man #105–106 (Marvel Comics, August 1985 – September 1985) – (co-writer)
  • Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man No. 111 (Marvel Comics, February 1986) – (Secret Wars II crossover)
  • Amazing High Adventure The Conquest of Kiurkan. No. 2 (Marvel Comics, September 1985)
  • Daredevil No. 224, No. 246 (Marvel Comics, November 1985)
  • Moon Knight vol. 2 No. 6 (Marvel Comics, December 1985)
  • The Savage Sword of Conan vol. 1
  • "The Beast." The Savage Sword of Conan No. 91 (Marvel Comics, August 1983)
  • "The Chain!" The Savage Sword of Conan No. 91 (Marvel Comics, August 1983)
  • "One Night at the Maul." The Savage Sword of Conan No. 99 (Marvel Comics, April 1984)
  • "The Vezek Inn." The Savage Sword of Conan No. 109 (Marvel Comics, February 1985)
  • "At the Altar of the Goat God." The Savage Sword of Conan No. 125 (Marvel Comics, June 1986) – (co-writer)
  • "Curse of the Ageless Ones!" The Savage Sword of Conan vol. 1 No. 128 (Marvel Comics, September 1986)
  • Thor No. 370 (Marvel Comics, August 1986)
  • Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man Annual No. 7 (Marvel Comics, 1987)
  • Web of Spider-Man #29–30 (Marvel Comics, August 1987 – September 1987)
  • Daredevil No. 246 (Marvel Comics, September 1987)
  • Web of Spider-Man No. 37 (Marvel Comics, April 1988)
  • "Phantasm." The Savage Sword of Conan No. 153 (Marvel Comics, October 1988)
  • "The Secret Origin of Green Lantern." Secret Origins No. 36 (DC Comics, January 1989)
  • Batman #431–432 (DC Comics, March 1989 – April 1989)
  • "Brothers." The Savage Sword of Conan No. 160 (Marvel Comics, May 1989)
  • Batman Annual No. 13 (DC Comics, 1989)
  • "The Sting." Marvel Super-Heroes vol. 3) No. 13 (Marvel Comics, April 1993) – (Iron Man story)
  • "Checkmate." Marvel Super-Heroes vol. 3 No. 13 (Marvel Comics, April 1993) – (Iron Man story)
  • Black Canary No. 8 (DC Comics, August 1993)
  • Wonder Woman #88–89 (DC Comics, July 1994 – August 1994)
  • Justice League America No. 92 (DC Comics, September 1994) – (Zero Hour crossover)
  • Justice League International No. 68 (DC Comics, September 1994) – (Zero Hour crossover)
  • Justice League Task Force No. 16 (DC Comics, September 1994) – (Zero Hour crossover)
  • Catwoman Annual No. 1 (DC Comics, 1994) – (Elseworlds story)
  • Superman: The Man of Steel Annual No. 3 (DC Comics, 1994) – (Elseworlds story)
  • Solar, Man of the Atom #44–45 (Acclaim Comics [Valiant], May 1995 – June 1995)
  • Showcase '96 No. 2 (DC Comics, February 1996) – (Circe story)
  • "Huntress: Exposure." The Batman Chronicles No. 4 (DC Comics, Spring 1996) – (Huntress story)
  • Justice League America Annual No. 10 (DC Comics, 1996)
  • "Hammered." Team Superman Secret Files No. 1 (DC Comics, May 1998) – (one-shot)
  • "Revelations." JLA 80-Page Giant No. 1 (DC Comics, July 1998) – (Aquaman and Wonder Woman story)
  • "The Professional." The Flash 80 Page Giant No. 1 (DC Comics, August 1998) – (Jesse Quick story)
  • "Heroes." JLA Secret Files No. 2 (DC Comics, August 1998)
  • Legends of the DC Universe #12–13 (DC Comics, January 1999 – February 1999) – (Justice League of America story)
  • "Phases." Green Lantern 80 Page Giant No. 2 (DC Comics, June 1999)
  • "The Game." JLA 80-Page Giant No. 2 (DC Comics, November 1999)
  • Hourman No. 20 (DC Comics, November 2000)
  • The Incredible Hulk vol. 3 No. 33 (Marvel Comics, December 2001)
  • "Masks." Marvel Double-Shot No. 2 (Marvel Comics, February 2003) – (Doctor Doom story)
  • Thor vol. 2 No. 59 (Marvel Comics, April 2003)
  • Vampirella vol. 8 1 (Dynamite Entertainmen , April 2019-Present)

Prose

Fiction

Nonfiction

Discography

References

  1. ^ Inkpot Award
  2. ^ Miller, John Jackson (June 10, 2005). "Comics Industry Birthdays". Comics Buyer's Guide. Iola, Wisconsin. Archived from the original on August 6, 2014. Retrieved December 22, 2010.Additional on July 10, 2012.
  3. ^ Priest, Christopher (August 1997). "Adventures in the Funny Book Game". Digitalpriest.com. Archived from the original on September 7, 2015. Christopher James Priest was born James Christopher Owsley in 1961 in Queens, New York.
  4. ^ Priest, Christopher (September 26, 2011). "About Priest". Lamerciepark.com. Archived from the original on January 5, 2017. I changed my last name 18 years ago...It is not a pen name. It's on my Social Security card and my driver's license.
  5. ^ Nerdist (May 15, 2018), The Impact of Black Panther, archived from the original on December 12, 2021, retrieved May 19, 2018 Note: All-Negro Comics in 1947 had black writers and a black editor.
  6. ^ "About the Artists & Writers," African-American Classics, Graphic Classics vol. 22 (Eureka Productions, 2011).
  7. ^ a b c Jim Owsley (editor) at the Grand Comics Database
  8. ^ a b c Rossen, Jake (May 8, 2008). "Craziest Moments from the World of Comics". Wizard Universe. Archived from the original on May 17, 2008.
  9. ^ "Bullpen Bulletins," Marvel Comics cover dated February 1984
  10. ^ Shooter, Jim. "Bullpen Bulletins," Marvel comics cover-dated November 1983
  11. ^ "Falcon #1". Grand Comics Database.
  12. ^ Priest, Christopher J. (James Owsley) (May 2002). "Adventures in the Funny Book Game: Chapter Two — Why I Never Discuss Spider-Man: Barabbas". Digital-Priest.com. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011.
  13. ^ Callahan, Timothy (December 2010). "Power Man and Iron Fist". Back Issue!. Raleigh, North Carolina: TwoMorrows Publishing (45): 3–11.
  14. ^ Martin, Brian (August 2017). "Where the Action is...Weekly". Back Issue!. Raleigh, North Carolina: TwoMorrows Publishing (98): 62.
  15. ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2008). "1990s". Marvel Chronicle A Year by Year History. London, United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. p. 290. ISBN 978-0756641238. Writer Christopher Priest and artist Mark Texeira put a new spin on the life of Wakanda Warrior King, Black Panther. ((cite book)): |first2= has generic name (help)
  16. ^ Riesman, Abraham (January 22, 2018). "The Man Who Made Black Panther Cool". Vulture. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  17. ^ "Interview: Christopher Priest Part 2". TheDollarBin.com. March 3, 2010. Archived from the original on March 17, 2016.
  18. ^ Booker, M. Keith, ed. (2010). Encyclopedia of Comic Books and Graphic Novels. Santa Barbara, California: Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 486. ISBN 978-0-313-35746-6.
  19. ^ Smith, Zach (October 12, 2013). "NYCC 2013: Quantum & Woody & Priest & Bright: Together Again". Newsarama. Archived from the original on May 19, 2017.
  20. ^ Ching, Albert (August 4, 2016). "Christopher Priest On Why Deathstroke Brought Him Back to Comics: 'He Wasn't Black'". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on May 19, 2017.
  21. ^ Sava, Oliver (February 15, 2018). "Iconic creators return to Wakanda in this Black Panther Annual exclusive". The A.V. Club. Archived from the original on June 13, 2018.
  22. ^ "Christopher Priest To Write Dynamite's New Vampirella Series". Previews World. April 8, 2019.
  23. ^ "Priest Launches Vampirella #1 in Dynamite's July 2019 Solicitations". April 19, 2019.
  24. ^ Spry, Jeff (October 15, 2020). "Marvel's U.S.Agent #1 preview with Christopher Priest interview". Syfy Wire. Retrieved October 15, 2020.
  25. ^ Priest, Christopher J. (2013). "Lamercie Park: The Story of Us". Lamerciepark.com. Archived from the original on August 29, 2017. Retrieved June 3, 2017.
  26. ^ "Hollis Stone – Streetwise". Discogs. n.d. Archived from the original on July 9, 2017.
  27. ^ "Live! Minister Darryl Cherry and the Covenant Mass Choir". CD Baby. n.d. Archived from the original on April 24, 2018. Retrieved June 8, 2017.
  28. ^ Priest, Christopher J. (n.d.). "PraiseNet". PraiseNet.Org.
  29. ^ Johnston, Rich (April 7, 2018). "Christopher Priest Says DC Readers Can Help Decide Whether or Not Deathstroke Is Damian's Daddy". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on June 13, 2018.
Preceded byKurt Busiek Power Man and Iron Fist writer 1984–1986 Succeeded byFred Van Lente Preceded byMichael Fleisher Conan the Barbarian writer 1985–1988(with Val Semeiks in 1988) Succeeded byVal SemeiksCharles Santino Preceded byTom DeFalco The Amazing Spider-Man writer 1987 Succeeded byDavid Michelinie Preceded byBob Haney Unknown Soldier writer 1988–1989 Succeeded byGarth Ennis Preceded byJack C. Harris The Ray writer 1994–1996 Succeeded byJustin GrayJimmy Palmiotti Preceded byMark Waid Justice League Task Force writer 1995–1996 Succeeded byn/a Preceded byLouise Simonson Steel writer 1997–1998 Succeeded byn/a Preceded byMark Waid Ka-Zar writer 1998 Succeeded byPaul Jenkins Preceded byDon McGregor Black Panther writer 1998–2003 Succeeded byReginald Hudlin Preceded byJoe Kelly Deadpool writer 1999–2000 Succeeded byJimmy Palmiotti Preceded byJames Bonny Deathstroke writer 2016–2020 Succeeded byJoshua Williamson(Deathstroke, Inc) Preceded byBryan Hitch Justice League writer 2018 Succeeded byScott Snyder