Bruce Timm
Bruce Timm by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Timm at the 2019 WonderCon
BornBruce Walter Timm
(1961-02-05) February 5, 1961 (age 61)
Oklahoma, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
Area(s)Artist, animator, writer, producer, director, voice actor
Notable works
Batman: The Animated Series (1992–1995)
Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993)
Superman: The Animated Series (1996–2000)
Batman Beyond (1999–2001)
Justice League (2001–2004)
Justice League Unlimited (2004–2006)
Green Lantern: The Animated Series (2012–2013)
Freakazoid! (1995–1997)
Justice League: Gods and Monsters (2015)
Justice League: Gods and Monsters Chronicles (2015)
All Star Superman (2011)
AwardsInkpot Award (2013)[1]
Children1

Bruce Walter Timm (born February 5, 1961)[2] is an American artist, character designer, animator, writer, producer and voice actor. He is best known for his contributions building the modern DC Comics animated franchise, most notably Batman: The Animated Series (1992–1995) and the subsequent DC Animated Universe, for which Timm made most of the character designs. Timm and Paul Dini co-created the characters Harley Quinn and Terry McGinnis.

He began his animation career as a layout artist for animation studios such as Filmation, Bakshi Productions, and Don Bluth Productions, before joining Warner Bros. in 1989. In addition to Batman: The Animated Series, Timm was a producer and writer for other DCAU series such as Superman: The Animated Series (1996–2000), The New Batman Adventures (1997–1999), Batman Beyond (1999–2001), Justice League (2001–2004), and Justice League Unlimited (2004–2006). He also co-created Freakazoid! (1995–1997) with Dini and developed Green Lantern: The Animated Series (2012–2013). Following the conclusion of the DCAU, Timm went on to produce several DC animated films.

Outside of animation, Timm has also drawn several comic books. Timm and Dini collaborated on The Batman Adventures: Mad Love, which won the Eisner Award for Best Single Story in 1994. Timm has also released two art books showcasing his erotic drawings of women, Naughty and Nice: The Good Girl Art of Bruce Timm and The Big Tease: A Naughty and Nice Collection.

Early life

Bruce Timm was born on February 5, 1961, in Oklahoma, the third of four brothers. His father was an engineer and his mother worked for the phone company. Timm's family first moved to Ohio when Timm was two years old, and then to California when Timm was five or six.[3]

Timm began drawing from a young age and developed a serious interest in comics around age 12 or 13. His first exposure to superhero media was the 1960s Batman television series.[4] Timm went to college for only one year before dropping out due to bad grades. After dropping out, he began working full-time at Kmart until he saw a Filmation ad inviting new artists to take a layout test. Timm applied but wasn't offered the job and went back to working for Kmart. The next summer, Filmation began hiring again. Timm passed the layout test on his second try and from that point on began working in animation.[5]

Career

Animation

Timm's early career in animation was varied; he started at Filmation, working on the layout of Blackstar, Flash Gordon, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, its spin-off She-Ra: Princess of Power, and The Lone Ranger (Timm also did background work on G.I. Joe).[6] He also worked for numerous other employers, including Ralph Bakshi, Don Bluth Productions, and attempted to find work at Marvel Comics and DC Comics, but without luck.[7] During an animators strike in 1982, Timm found himself out of work and went back to Kmart for about half a year, before being hired by Don Bluth to help work on The Secret of NIMH. In 1987, he was hired by John Kricfalusi to do layouts for Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures, which Timm called "artistically and creatively the most fulfilling job that I'd had in the animation business" up to that point.[8] He worked at DiC on The Real Ghostbusters for one season in 1988, then joined Warner Bros. in 1989. At Warner, Timm worked on Tiny Toon Adventures.[9]

However, Timm is best known for his subsequent work on the animated series based on various DC Comics superheroes, popularly referred to as the "DCAU" (DC animated universe) and also named Timmverse or Diniverse after both him and Paul Dini.[10] Along with his Tiny Toons partner Eric Radomski, Timm co-created and produced the Emmy Award-winning Batman: The Animated Series, which premiered on September 5, 1992, through which he and Dini co-created the character of Harley Quinn, and went on to co-create and produce Superman: The Animated Series (premiered in September 1996), The New Batman Adventures (premiered in September 1997), and Batman Beyond (premiered in January 1999), through which he and Dini co-created the character of Terry McGinnis and his supporting cast. He also served as producer on the feature-length Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker[11] before taking the helm as creator and producer of the animated version of Justice League, which debuted in November 2001; the series continued in the form of Justice League Unlimited.[12] Timm was also the producer and creator of Green Lantern: The Animated Series.[13] Along with Dini he created the animated series Freakazoid! (premiered in September 1995).[14]

Although he shared character designer duties on Superman: The Animated Series and Justice League with James Tucker, Timm did virtually all the original character designs for Batman: The Animated Series himself (with the exceptions of Mr. Freeze and the Riddler, who were designed by Mike Mignola and the characters Man Bat and the Mad Hatter, who were designed by Kevin Nowlan).[15]

His 2008 project Batman: Gotham Knight is a departure from the "Timmverse" style, with Timm in a producer role collaborating with Japanese animators on a direct-to-DVD anthology that takes place between Batman Begins and The Dark Knight.[16] In 2013, following the release of The Dark Knight Returns animated feature, Timm stepped down as DC animation supervising producer; James Tucker was named as his replacement.[17] Timm still works at Warner Brothers, and executive produced the DC Universe Original Animated Movies[18] Justice League: Gods and Monsters[19] and Batman: The Killing Joke,[20] and series Justice League: Gods and Monsters Chronicles.[21]

In 2013, he worked with Man of Steel director Zack Snyder, in creating a 75th anniversary short of Superman.[22]

In 2014, he released Batman: Strange Days, an animated short celebrating the 75th anniversary of Batman and an homage to one of Hugo Strange's first appearances in the comic books.[23]

In 2021, Timm was announced to be executive producing a new Batman animated series titled Batman: Caped Crusader alongside J.J Abrams and Matt Reeves. Timm described the series as "more Batman: The Animated Series than Batman: The Animated Series. It kind of goes back to the original principles of the show that we originally came up with in the early '90s. There were certain limitations on what we could do in terms of adult content; in terms of violence and adult themes. My idea is basically to say, 'OK, it's 1990 again, I get to do what I want to do this time, and I got JJ and Matt backing me up.'"[24]

Acting

Timm has played several characters in the animated series he has been involved in. His cameos include the episode of Batman: The Animated Series, "Beware the Gray Ghost", playing the toy shop owner,[25] as himself in the episode of The New Batman Adventures, "Holiday Knights", and as the leader of the Jokerz gang in Batman Beyond, which he joked he did under duress and was "Emmy Award-winning material".[26] He appeared in animated form as Arkham Asylum patient in The Batman. He subsequently appeared in an animated form in Batman: The Brave and the Bold episode "Legends of the Dark Mite" in a comic book convention parody scene, in which he wore Joker's costume, alongside Paul Dini in Harley Quinn's costume.[26] He played a guard in the direct-to-video animated film Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker.[27]

Timm made a cameo appearance in the 2009 film Green Lantern: First Flight as Bug Boy, he played The Riddler in the 2010 film Batman: Under the Red Hood, and appeared as Galius Zed in the 2011 film Green Lantern: Emerald Knights.[28]

Comics

Harley Quinn (concept by Paul Dini) illustrated by Timm.
Harley Quinn (concept by Paul Dini) illustrated by Timm.

While Timm is known primarily for his work in animation, his first ambition was to become a comic-book artist and has thus produced several one-shots and miniseries, mostly for DC Comics.[29] His earliest comic book work was drawing He-Man and other Masters of the Universe mini-comics that would be packaged with Mattel toys in the 1980s.[30][31]

In 1994, Timm and writer Paul Dini won the Eisner Award for Best Single Story for Batman Adventures: Mad Love.[32] Timm won the same prize the next year as well, for Batman Adventures Holiday Special, (a one-shot with several Christmas-themed stories) with Dini, Ronnie del Carmen, and others.[33] Later, Timm was involved with Batman Adventures and has also worked on Avengers and Vampirella.[34][35]

In 2000, he did the art for an issue of DC's Vertigo imprint horror title, Flinch.[36]

Bruce Timm co-created Harley Quinn (with Paul Dini), working from Dini's original design.[37] Harley's popularity on television led to her inclusion in the mainstream DC Universe. In 2004, Timm and Dini (assisted by Shane Glines as inker) released a three-issue Harley and Ivy miniseries, which was in the works for years.[38]

Timm also drew the 1999 Avengers 1½ special for Marvel Comics, written by Roger Stern.[36]

In 2005, Timm contributed artwork for two comics. One was a short story in Conan #18, titled "Conan's Favorite Joke". The other was a Black Canary short story in Birds of Prey #86.[38]

In 2008, he provided the art work for a short two-page Harley Quinn origin story for Paul Dini's Countdown.[38]

Timm was featured in "Conan Gets Animated", a skit in the December 9, 2010 episode of the TBS late night talk show Conan, in which host Conan O'Brien enlisted his help in designing a new superhero, based on O'Brien's specifications. The superhero, who was designed to resemble O'Brien, included a typically muscular superhero body and costume with chest insignia, as well as idiosyncrasies such as an oven mitt, a jai alai glove, golf shoes, sock garters, and fishnet stockings.[39] One month later, O'Brien aired a clip on his show in which the character, named "The Flaming C", appears in Young Justice.[40]

In 2012, Timm released a book of erotic art, "Naughty and Nice: The Good Girl Art of Bruce Timm," showcasing more than 300 pencil, line, and full color erotic drawings of women.[41]

In 2013, Timm provided the cover artwork for Adventures of Superman #4.[42]

In 2020, Timm released a book of erotic art, "The Big Tease: A Naughty and Nice Collection," showcasing more than 208 pencil, line, and full color erotic drawings of women.[43]

Drawing style and influences

Timm's minimalist, angular style is heavily based in his love of 1950s- and 1960s-era comics and Art Deco architecture style.[44] He is also completely self-taught, having never received any formal art schooling.[5] He lists his artistic influences as Jack Kirby, Harvey Kurtzman, Jim Steranko, John Buscema, Wally Wood, Frank Frazetta, Dan DeCarlo, and Alex Toth.[45][46]

Personal life

Timm is married and has one daughter.[46]

Filmography

Film

List of voice performances in films
Year Title Role Notes
2000 Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker Guard[27] Direct-to-video
2009 Wonder Woman Attacker[27] Direct-to-video
2009 Green Lantern: First Flight Bug Boy[27] Direct-to-video
2009 Superman/Batman: Public Enemies Mongul[27] Direct-to-video
2010 Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths Uncle Super (credited) / Captain Super Jr. (uncredited)[27] Direct-to-video
2010 Batman: Under the Red Hood The Riddler[27] Direct-to-video
2011 Green Lantern: Emerald Knights Galius Zed[27] Direct-to-video
2012 Justice League: Doom Ace[27] Direct-to-video
2012 Superman vs. The Elite MI-5 Agent[27] Direct-to-video
2012 The Dark Knight Returns Part 1 Thomas Wayne[27] Direct-to-video
2016 Batman: The Killing Joke Patrolman[27]
2017 Batman and Harley Quinn Michael J. Carter / Booster Gold[27] Direct-to-video
2018 Batman: Gotham by Gaslight Arkham Radio Man[27] Direct-to-video
2019 Justice League vs. the Fatal Five Two-Face[27] Direct-to-video

Television

List of voice performances in television series
Year Title Role Notes
1992–1993 Batman: The Animated Series Red / The Mad Bomber / Ted Dymer[27] 2 episodes
1999–2001 Batman Beyond J-Man / Jokerz Leader / Top Hat Joker[27] 5 episodes
2003 Justice League Soldier Episode: "The Terror Beyond"
2004 Justice League Unlimited Solomon Grundy / Stu / Husband (uncredited)[27] 2 episodes

Writing

Year Title Credited as Network Notes
Writer Exec. producer Developer Showrunner
1992–1995 Batman: The Animated Series Yes FOX
1996–2000 Superman: The Animated Series Yes The WB
1997–1999 The New Batman Adventures Yes The WB
1999–2001 Batman Beyond No Yes The WB
2001–2004 Justice League Yes Cartoon Network
2003–2004 Teen Titans No Yes No Cartoon Network
2004–2006 Justice League Unlimited Yes Cartoon Network
2012–2013 Green Lantern: The Animated Series No Yes Cartoon Network
2017 Batman and Harley Quinn Yes No Film
TBA Batman: Caped Crusader Yes HBO Max/Cartoon Network

Bibliography

Dark Horse Comics[edit]

DC Comics[edit]

Art of Fiction[edit]

  • All Crime Comics #1–2 (2013)

Eternity Comics[edit]

Flesk Publications[edit]

  • Naughty and Nice: The Good Girl Art Of Bruce Timm (2012)
  • The Big Tease: A "Naughty and Nice" Collection (2020)

Image Comics[edit]

Pied Paper[edit]

  • The New Humans #1, 5 (1987–1988)

Dynamite Entertainment[edit]

Marvel Comics[edit]

  • Avengers #1½ (1999)
  • Fantastic Four: The World's Greatest Comics Magazine #1–12

TwoMorrows Publishing[edit]

First Comics[edit]

  • Whisper #13–16, 22–23, 25 (1988–1989)
  • Twilight Man #1–4 (1989)

H. H. Windsor[edit]

  • Masters of the Universe minicomic #25, 30, 32–35, 39, 42–44, 48–49 (1984–1986)


References

  1. ^ Inkpot Award
  2. ^ "Bruce Timm". Norman Rockwell Museum. Retrieved May 3, 2017.
  3. ^ Nolen-Weathington 2004, p. 6.
  4. ^ Nolen-Weathington 2004, p. 7.
  5. ^ a b Nolen-Weathington 2004, p. 10.
  6. ^ Arrant, Chris (October 14, 2013). "Bruce Timm's secret origin: He-Man & the Masters of the Universe". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on May 31, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  7. ^ Nolen-Weathington 2004, pp. 20–25.
  8. ^ Nolen-Weathington 2004, p. 26.
  9. ^ Nolen-Weathington 2004, pp. 34–35.
  10. ^ Parkin, John (August 7, 2016). "What Was So Great About the DC Animated Universe? Just About Everything". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on May 16, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  11. ^ Hickson, Colin (July 18, 2019). "Batman Beyond: Details of Scrapped Return of the Joker Sequel Revealed". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on July 19, 2019. Retrieved July 18, 2019.
  12. ^ MacReady, Melody (July 23, 2020). "Batman: The Animated Series & Every Other Show In The DCAU". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved July 23, 2020.
  13. ^ Amaya, Erik (October 21, 2011). "NYCC: Bruce Timm Animates "Green Lantern"". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on August 14, 2019. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  14. ^ "Freak Out! Everything you didn't know about Freakazoid!". Syfy Wire. June 11, 2020. Retrieved June 11, 2020.
  15. ^ Morrison, Matt (September 7, 2020). "Why Batman The Animated Series Is The Best Version (So Far)". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on September 12, 2020. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  16. ^ Jones, Seth (July 10, 2008). "Timm talks "Batman: Gotham Knight"". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on September 27, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  17. ^ Wilson, Matt D. (March 29, 2013). "Bruce Timm Releases The Reins Of Warner Bros. Animation's 'DC Universe' Features". ComicsAlliance. Archived from the original on February 14, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  18. ^ Melrose, Kevin. "Bruce Timm Steps Down as DC DVD Producer". Newsarama. Retrieved May 27, 2013.
  19. ^ Dyce, Andrew (June 8, 2015). "Bruce Timm Talks 'Justice League Gods & Monsters,' Harley Quinn & More". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on April 26, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  20. ^ Moore, Trent (January 13, 2016). "Bruce Timm on building a story around Batman: The Killing Joke". Syfy Wire. Archived from the original on October 16, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  21. ^ Sagers, Aaron (June 26, 2015). "Exclusive: Bruce Timm on Gods And Monsters, Suicide Squad's Harley Quinn". Syfy Wire. Archived from the original on July 31, 2018. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  22. ^ Breznican, Anthony (October 14, 2013). "Superman: 75 years of heroic history in one 2-minute animated short". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on April 27, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  23. ^ "Exclusive Interview: Bruce Timm On His Return to Batman With 'Strange Days' [Video]". ComicsAlliance. April 9, 2014. Archived from the original on August 28, 2016. Retrieved October 31, 2016.
  24. ^ Skrebels, Joe (October 16, 2021). "Batman: Caped Crusader Is 'Adult', 'Psychologially Complex', and Includes New Versions of Familiar Characters - DC FanDome 2021". IGN. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  25. ^ Kendall, G. (August 5, 2017). "Batman: The Animated Series - When the Dark Knight Met His Idol". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on August 7, 2017. Retrieved August 5, 2017.
  26. ^ a b Castro, Danilo (January 11, 2017). "15 Things You Never Knew About Batman Beyond". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on May 16, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Behind The Voice Actors – Bruce Timm". Behind The Voice Actors. Archived from the original on June 22, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2017. – green check mark indicates roles that have been verified by BTVA through closing credits
  28. ^ Sikula, Dave (April 2, 2011). "WC11: "Green Lantern: Emerald Knights" World Premiere". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on January 25, 2021. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  29. ^ Nolen-Weathington 2004, p. 18.
  30. ^ Nolen-Weathington 2004, p. 22.
  31. ^ Leslie, Lee (April 16, 2013). "The Surprisingly Awesome Comics History of 'Masters Of The Universe'". ComicsAlliance. Archived from the original on January 25, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  32. ^ Kendall, G. (March 4, 2018). "Revisiting the Little Known Sequel to The Joker & Harley's Mad Love". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on December 20, 2019. Retrieved December 20, 2019.
  33. ^ Sims, Chris (July 2, 2015). "On The Cheap: The 50-Page 'Batman Adventures Holiday Special' Is 99 Cents This Week". ComicsAlliance. Archived from the original on February 24, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  34. ^ Nolen-Weathington 2004, pp. 88–90.
  35. ^ Khouri, Andy (September 7, 2011). "WHAT: 'Vampirella' Short Story By Bruce Timm And Ty Templeton [Preview]". ComicsAlliance. Archived from the original on June 16, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  36. ^ a b Wilson, Matt D. (February 8, 2016). "Just Making a Good Show: A Birthday Tribute to Bruce Timm". ComicsAlliance. Archived from the original on June 15, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  37. ^ Avila, Mike (September 25, 2017). "Watch: Bruce Timm reveals the origin of Harley Quinn's origin story". Syfy Wire. Archived from the original on September 26, 2017. Retrieved September 25, 2017.
  38. ^ a b c Bruce Timm at the Grand Comics Database
  39. ^ "Conan Gets Animated", Conan, TBS, December 9, 2010
  40. ^ ""The Flaming C" Returns!". Conan. Team Coco/TBS. January 10, 2011. Retrieved January 11, 2011.[permanent dead link]
  41. ^ Timm, Bruce (2012). Naughty and Nice: The Good Girl Art of Bruce Timm. Santa Cruz, California: Flesk Publications. ISBN 978-1640410473.
  42. ^ Khouri, Andy (February 7, 2013). "New Digital-First Superman Series to Feature Timm, Hitch, Samnee, Sprouse and More with Out-of-Continuity Adventures". ComicsAlliance. Archived from the original on June 15, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017.
  43. ^ Timm, Bruce (2020). The Big Tease: A Naughty and Nice Collection. Santa Cruz, California: Flesk Publications. ISBN 978-1640410312.
  44. ^ Nolen-Weathington 2004, p. 54.
  45. ^ Nolen-Weathington 2004, pp. 12–17.
  46. ^ a b Cooke, Jon B. "Timm of the New Gods". TwoMorrows Publishing. Archived from the original on April 13, 2014. Retrieved September 2, 2013.

Sources