Electoral system

Party system

A political organization is a political party when its candidate for governor receives at least 10 percent of the vote in the latest general election.[1] Party members choose their party's nominees for the general election in a primary election.[2] Party members also elect the county central committee members at the primary election.[3] Colorado uses an open primary system, whereby party members and unaffiliated voters may vote in the party's primary.[4][5][6]

There are three distinct aspects of party organization: the committee system, the designating assembly system, and the convention system.[3] The systems operate with respect to public offices for the state, counties, US congressional districts, state senatorial districts, state representative districts, and state judicial districts. (Judicial district elections only concern the district attorney;[7] district court and county court judges are nominated by a judicial nominating commission of the judicial district.[8])

To be designated to contest the party's nomination at a primary election, a candidate must receive at least 30 percent of the delegates' votes at a party assembly.[20] Candidates may also petition party members to contest the primary election, with at least 20 percent of the party members (of those registered within that political subdivision) for offices of or within a county, 30 percent for districts larger than a county, and 2 percent for statewide offices.[21][7]

Election procedure

A combination of local caucuses, primaries and general elections determines the top state offices (Governor, Secretary of State and Attorney General), as well as U.S. and state legislative races. Presidential races are decided by primary and general elections, with no caucuses. Legislation passed in 2016 instituted open primaries beginning with the 2018 races, and eliminated caucuses for presidential races starting in 2020.[6][22]

Electoral history

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See also

References

Citations

  1. ^ Lorch 1991, p. 128.
  2. ^ Lorch 1991, p. 125.
  3. ^ a b Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 167.
  4. ^ Lorch 1991, p. 127.
  5. ^ a b Cronin & Loevy 1993, p. 133.
  6. ^ a b c Bianchi, Chris (2018-02-19). "Caucus? Primary? A Voters' Guide to Colorado's Elections". Westword. Retrieved 2018-05-07.
  7. ^ a b Cronin & Loevy 1993, p. 136.
  8. ^ Cronin & Loevy 1993, pp. 229–231.
  9. ^ Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 168.
  10. ^ a b Cronin & Loevy 1993, pp. 132–134.
  11. ^ a b c Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 170.
  12. ^ a b Cronin & Loevy 1993, pp. 136–137.
  13. ^ a b c Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 171.
  14. ^ Martin & Gomez 1976, pp. 169–171.
  15. ^ Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 175.
  16. ^ a b Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 173.
  17. ^ a b Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 169.
  18. ^ Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 174.
  19. ^ Martin & Gomez 1976, p. 172.
  20. ^ Cronin & Loevy 1993, pp. 131–132.
  21. ^ Lorch 1991, pp. 130–131.
  22. ^ "Primary Elections FAQs". Colorado Secretary of State. State of Colorado. Retrieved 5 September 2020.

Sources