Walt Disney Animation Studios logo
Walt Disney Animation Studios logo since 2007
Walt Disney Animation Studios' current headquarters, the Roy E. Disney Animation Building, is located in Burbank, California across the street from the main Disney studio lot.
The south side of the Roy E. Disney Animation Building, as seen from the public park that separates it from the Ventura Freeway.

The Walt Disney Company has owned and operated several animation studios since the company's founding on October 16, 1923, by Walt and Roy Disney as the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio; the current Walt Disney Animation Studios in Burbank, California is the company's flagship feature animation studio and claims heritage from this original studio. Adding to the growth of the company and its motion picture studio division the Walt Disney Studios, several other animation studios were added through acquisitions and through openings of satellite studios outside the United States. These expanded the company's animation output into television, direct-to-video, and digital releases, in addition to its primary feature animation releases.

Currently Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar, Lucasfilm Animation (through Lucasfilm) and 20th Century Studios's animation division are parts of the Walt Disney Studios unit. This article does not include other animation studios whose films were released by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures (the company's distribution unit) and not acquired by the company, nor does it count the Laugh-O-Gram Studio (1921–23), Disney's first animation studio, which predated the founding of the Walt Disney Company. For example, certain Studio Ghibli films were distributed by Disney internationally but never owned by the company.[1] Also, Miramax, an independently operating unit of the Walt Disney Studios, also purchased US rights to foreign animated movies.[2]

Full list

Current animation studios
Studio Established Parent unit
1923
Animation: Theatrical feature films and short films in hand-drawn and CGI


Former names: Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio (1923),[Note 1] Walt Disney Studios (1926),[Note 2] Walt Disney Productions (1929–1985),[Note 3] Walt Disney Feature Animation (1986–2006)[Note 4]
Former Units: The Secret Lab (1999–2001), Disney Circle 7 Animation (2004–2006)[Note 5] DisneyToon Studios (2003–2006; 2008–2018)
Former satellite studios: Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida (1989–2004) Disney Animation Australia (1988–2006) Disney Animation Canada (1996–2000) Disney Animation France/Paris/Strasbourg (1989–2003) Disney Animation Japan/Walt Disney Television International Japan (1989–2004) Disney Animation U.K. (1986–1991)

1979
The Walt Disney Studios
Animation: Computer generated animated theatrical feature films and short films
Acquired in 2006.

Former names: Graphics Group (1979–1986)
Former satellite studios: Pixar Canada (2010–2013)

1984
Animation: Television series
Originally a part of the Disney animation group, Disney TV Animation was transferred into Disney Television and later to the Disney Channels


Former names: Walt Disney Pictures Television Animation Group (1984), Walt Disney Television Animation (1987–2011)
Former satellite studios: Disney Animation Australia/DisneyToon Studios Australia (1988–2006) Disney Animation Canada (1996–2000) Disney Animation France/Disney Animation Paris/Walt Disney Animation Studios Strasbourg (1989–2003) Disney Animation Japan/Walt Disney Television International Japan (1989–2004) Disney Animation U.K. (1986–1991) Disney MovieToons (1990–2003; theatrical name)/Disney Video Premieres (1994–2003; direct to video) Jetix Animation Concepts (2004–2009)

1994
20th Century Studios (The Walt Disney Studios)
Animation: animated theatrical feature films
Acquired in 2019 in the 21st Century Fox acquisition.


Former names: Fox Family Films, Fox Animation Studios, 20th Century Fox Animation
Former units: Fox Animation Studios (1994–2000), Blue Sky Studios (1987–2021)

1999
Animation: animated TV series
Acquired in 2019 in the 21st Century Fox acquisition.


Divested or defunct animation studios
Studio Established status
1987
closed in 2021
Animation: animated CGI theatrical feature films
Acquired in 2019 in the 21st Century Fox acquisition. Closed in 2021 with its Intellectual Property absorbed into 20th Century Animation.
1971
sold in 2000
Animation: Television series and Feature films


Founded in 1971 and was acquired with the purchase of Capital Cities/ABC in 1996. Founder with investment firms backing purchased the company in 2000.

1990
closed in 2000
Founded by Jim Jinkins and David Campbell and acquired by Disney in 1996.
1997
discontinued animation
Founded in 1997 by stay-at-home mom and former teacher Julie Aigner-Clark, Acquired by Disney in 2000.[2] Discontinued making videos in 2009. Now owned by Kids II, Inc.
1996
merged in 1999
VFX & animated unit acquired in 1996 and merged into Secret Labs in 1999.
Live production unit of ABC that dabbled in TV and feature film animation.
2004
closed in 2006
Also known as: Circle 7 Animation

a short-lived division of Walt Disney Feature Animation specializing in computer generated imagery (CGI) animation and was originally going to work on making sequels to the Disney-owned Pixar properties.

2007
closed in 2011
Joint venture between Disney and ImageMovers, venture cancelled after two films.
1984
Dormant
Formed in 1984 as Saban Entertainment by music and TV producers Haim Saban and Shuki Levy. Acquired as part of Fox Family Worldwide on October 24, 2001, and renamed to BVS Entertainment alongside other subsidiaries. One portion that worked on the English dub of Digimon was renamed to Sensation Animation and was closed when Disney lost the rights to dub the series. Currently dormant after Disney sold off the Power Rangers franchise and related shows back to Haim Saban and his company Saban Capital Group in 2010.


Units: Saban International Paris and Saban International Strasbourg (sold off in 2001), BVS International N.V.
BVS International Services, Inc.

1977
closed in 2009
Founded in France by Haim Saban and Jacqueline Tordjman in 1977 as Saban International Paris and Saban International Strasbourg. Acquired alongside parent company Saban Entertainment in 2001 as part of the Fox Family Worldwide buyout. Eventually Split from parent company, leaving Fox Family Worldwide holding 49%, to become an independent studio in the same year with Disney purchasing Fox Family Worldwide and renamed to its current name in 2002. Closed in 2009.


Former names: Saban International Paris
Also known as: Saban International Strasbourg

Divested or defunct animation units
Studio Established status
1989
closed in 2004
Domestic division created to be an active attraction at Disney-MGM Studios and for additional output.
1990
closed in 2018
Animation: theatrical, direct to video, short and television films and Wrap-around animation
Began as a sequel theatrical unit of Disney Television Animation and adding direct to video features before being transferred to Features Animation in 2003 and Disney Studios from 2006 to 2008


Former names: Disney MovieToons (1990–2003; theatrical name), Disney video premieres (1994–2003; direct to video)
Former satellite studios: Disney Animation Australia/DisneyToon Studios Australia (1988–2006) Disney Animation Canada (1996–2000) Disney Animation France/Disney Animation Paris/Walt Disney Animation Studios Strasbourg (1989–2007) Disney Animation Japan/Walt Disney Television International Japan (1989–2004) Disney Animation U.K. (1986–1991)

1999
closed in 2001
Formed from the merger of Dream Quest Images and Disney Feature Animation's Computer Graphics division.
1988
Closed in 2006
Also known as: DisneyToon Studios Australia

Established in 1988; worked on several Walt Disney Television Animation and DisneyToon Studios projects.

1996
Closed in 2000
Established in 1996, mostly working on several Disney Video Premiere projects.
1996
Closed in 2003
Former name: Brizzi Films, Disney Animation Paris
Also known as: Walt Disney Animation Studios Strasbourg

Acquired in 1989 for use on certain Walt Disney Television Animation and Disney MovieToons projects, then shifted to Walt Disney Feature Animation projects in 1995.

1988
Closed in 2004
Also known as: Walt Disney Television International Japan

Established in 1988; worked on several Walt Disney Television Animation and DisneyToon Studios projects.

1986
Closed in 1991
Established in 1986; worked on Who Framed Roger Rabbit and a few other Disney projects.
2010
Closed in 2013
This was a wholly owned subsidiary of Pixar Animation Studios. It was located in Vancouver, British Columbia. The studio was tasked to produce short films based on Pixar's feature film characters.

Walt Disney Studios

Main article: the Walt Disney Studios (division)

Walt Disney Animation Studios

Main article: Walt Disney Animation Studios

Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida

Main article: Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida

DisneyToon Studios

Main article: DisneyToon Studios

DisneyToon Studios, formerly Disney Movietoons,[4] was an American animation studio owned by the Walt Disney Company, responsible for producing direct-to-video and occasional theatrical films for Disney Animation Studios, a part of the Walt Disney Studios.[3]

Disney Circle 7 Animation

Main article: Circle 7 Animation

Circle 7 Animation, or Disney Circle 7 Animation, was a short-lived division of Walt Disney Feature Animation specializing in computer generated imagery (CGI) animation and was originally going to work on making sequels to the Disney-owned Pixar properties, leading rivals and animators[5] to derisively nickname the division "Pixaren't". The company released no movies during its tenure.[6]

Steve Jobs, Pixar CEO, announced in January 2004 that Pixar would not renew their agreement with Disney and would seek out other distributors for releases starting in 2006.[7] In 2004, Disney Circle 7 Animation was formed as a CG animation studio to create sequels to the Disney-owned Pixar properties.[6] In late January 2006, new Disney CEO Bob Iger and Jobs agreed to have Disney purchase Pixar[8] which led to Disney closing Circle 7.[9]

The Secret Lab

The Secret Lab
FormerlyDream Quest Images (1979–1999)
Company typeDivision
IndustryEntertainment
Founded
  • 1979 (as Dream Quest Images)[10]
Founders
Defunct2002
FateClosed
Headquarters,
United States
Key people
Andrew Millstein (GM, VP)
Production output
VFX, Animation
OwnerThe Walt Disney Company (1996-2005)
Number of employees
350 (2002)[11]
ParentWalt Disney Feature Animation (1996–2005)
DivisionsDQ Films[12]

The Secret Lab was an American special effects company that operated from 1979 to 2005, and was the result of a merger between Dream Quest Images and Walt Disney Feature Animation's Computer Graphics division.

Dream Quest was founded in a Santa Monica, California garage in 1979[12][10] by Hoyt Yeatman, Scott Squires, Rocco Gioffre, Fred Iguchi, Tom Hollister and Bob Hollister.[13] Initially, they did piecemeal work on Escape from New York, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, and One From the Heart[13] before moving to Culver City. DQ Films, the company's television commercial production division, remained in Santa Monica. In 1987, DQI model-making operations moved into a Simi Valley industrial park with most of the company following them later on.[12] Their work on The Abyss and Total Recall each earned the company an Academy Award[14]

The Walt Disney Company purchased the company in April 1996 and subsequently moved it to Burbank, California.[12] DQI was purchased to replace Buena Vista Visual Effects.[15] Soon after 1997, Andrew Millstein was appointed general manager of the company.[16]

In October 1999, Dream Quest Images merged with Walt Disney Feature Animation's computer graphics division to form The Secret Lab,[17][10] with Millstein continuing as general manager and vice president.[16][17] The DQI and WDFA units were moved into a new location at Disney's Northside facility on Thornton Avenue just east of the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport, Lockheed Corp.'s former Skunk Works Building 90 until it was renovated for WDFA's headquarters in 1995. DQI's physical production facilities remained in Simi Valley.[17]

The Secret Lab produced one CG animated motion picture, Dinosaur, in 2000.[17] After Dinosaur, the Lab and WDFA began working on Wildlife, which was canceled that September.[18]

The Lab being passed over for Disney work (and general industry decline) led to the unit being closed in 2005. The Secret Lab's last work with Disney was for the Touchstone Pictures/Spyglass Entertainment film Reign of Fire and the Castle Rock Entertainment/Warner Bros. comedy Kangaroo Jack.[10] An artist at The Secret Lab purportedly confided to Harry Knowles of Ain't It Cool News that the studio was shut down by Disney when it proved to be too expensive.[19]

VFXography

Pixar

Main article: Pixar

Pixar (/ˈpɪksɑːr/) is an American computer animation film studio based in Emeryville, California. The studio is best known for its CGI-animated feature films created with PhotoRealistic RenderMan, its own implementation of the industry-standard RenderMan image-rendering application programming interface used to generate high-quality images. Pixar began in 1979 as the Graphics Group, part of the computer division of Lucasfilm before its spin-out as a corporation in 1986 with funding by Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs, who became its majority shareholder.[citation needed] Pixar and Disney had a seven feature agreement that allowed Disney to distribute the films with Disney owing the character rights. With the success of Toy Story 2 in 1999, then-Disney CEO Michael Eisner and Pixar CEO Steve Jobs began to disagree on how Pixar should be run and the terms of their continued relationship.[6] Eisner claimed that Toy Story 2 would not count towards the "original" film count of the agreement.[20] Jobs announced in January 2004 that Pixar would not renew their agreement with Disney and would seek out other distributors for releases starting in 2006.[7] In 2004, Disney Circle 7 Animation was formed as a CG animation studio to create sequels to the Disney-owned Pixar properties.[6] In late January 2006, new Disney CEO Bob Iger and Jobs agreed to have Disney purchase Pixar[8] which led to Disney closing Circle 7.[9]

Pixar Canada

Main article: Pixar Canada

Marvel Studios

Marvel Animation

With Disney's 2009 purchase of Marvel Entertainment, Disney acquired Marvel Animation, a component of Marvel Entertainment.[21] which now has a studio in Glendale, California.[22][23] The studio became a Marvel Studios subisdiary after Kevin Feige was named chief creative officer of Marvel Entertainment.

Marvel Studios Animation

In July 2021, Marvel Studios opened an in-house animation division named Marvel Studios Animation, though which they would develop mainly animated projects set within the Marvel Cinematic Universe, in addition to stand-alone projects. Brad Winderbaum as Head of Television, Streaming, and Animation, and Dana Vasquez-Eberhardt as VP of Animation.

Lucasfilm Animation

Lucasfilm Animation was added as an animation unit as part of the acquisition of Lucasfilm in 2012.[24]

20th Century Animation

Main article: 20th Century Animation

Blue Sky Studios

Main article: Blue Sky Studios

Distribution deals

Main article: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

In August 1996, Disney and Tokuma Shoten Publishing agreed that Disney would internationally distribute Tokuma's Studio Ghibli animated films.[1] In 2002, Disney signed a four-picture deal with Vanguard Animation,[25] although, only one film was released under that negotiation.[26]

Walt Disney Television

Main article: Disney General Entertainment Content

Disney Television Animation

Main article: Disney Television Animation

Following the arrival of Michael Eisner,Walt Disney Pictures Television Animation Group was established on December 5, 1984. Following re-incorporation of The Walt Disney Company in 1986. The name of the TV animation unit was shortened to Walt Disney Television Animation. the following year in 1987. This name was used to 2011 when it was shortened to Disney Television Animation.

In January 2003, Disney initiated a reorganization of its theatrical and animation units to improve resource usage and continued focus on new characters and franchise development. TV Animation was transferred to Disney Channel Worldwide.[27] Disney MovieToons/Disney Video Premieres unit was transferred from Disney Television Animation to Disney Feature Animation.[28][29]

20th Television Animation

Main article: 20th Television Animation

Animation unit which was acquired as part of Acquisition of 21st Century Fox by Disney

DIC Entertainment L.P.

With Disney's acquisition of Capital Cities/ABC in 1995 came another animated unit, DIC Entertainment L.P., a Limited Partnership with CC/ABC and Andy Heyward. Eventually, DIC management arranged for the studio to become independent from Disney in 2001.[2]

Greengrass Productions

Greengrass Productions is a unit of ABC at the time CC/ABC was acquired by Disney and produced some animation.[2]

Jetix related

Disney purchased the Fox Family/Fox Kids Worldwide franchise on October 24, 2001, for the Fox Family Channel and also received ownership of several units and assets, including Saban Entertainment and Saban International.[2] The Saban library also included the 75.7% majority stake in Fox Kids Europe N.V., the Latin American Fox Kids channel, Saban International Paris and Saban International Strasbourg, Saban International Services, various original Fox Kids programming, and the acquired all-original and Marvel Comics-based DePatie-Freleng Enterprises/Marvel Productions and Marvel Films Animation/New World Animation libraries.[30] Afterwards, Saban International Paris and Saban International Strasbourg split from Saban and became independent, with the Walt Disney Company taking in a 49% minority stake of the company and a name change to SIP Animation on October 1, 2002.[31][32][33] Jetix Animation Concepts was a joint-venture between Walt Disney Television Animation and Jetix Europe N.V. for shows that broadcast for the Jetix channels.

Overseas studios

Three overseas animation studios (Australia, Japan and Canada) were set up to produce the company's animated television series. As direct-to-video increased in importance, the overseas studios moved to making feature films.[34]

Disney Animation Australia

Walt Disney Television Animation (Australia) Pty. Limited
Disney Animation Australia
DisneyToon Studios Australia
Company typeSubsidiary
IndustryEntertainment
Founded1988
Defunct2006
FateClosed
Headquarters
Sydney[35]
,
Australia
Key people
Philip Oakes (general manager)[36]
Production output
Animation
Number of employees
~ 250 (2005)[37]
Parent

Disney Animation Australia (DAA), also DisneyToon Studios Australia,[37] was a Disney animation studio located in Sydney.[35]

DAA was started in 1988 at the former Hanna-Barbera overseas studio in St Leonards, Sydney. Initially, Animation Australia worked on various television shows including Aladdin, Timon & Pumbaa, and Goof Troop. As staffing increased, the studio moved to Castlereagh Street.[36]

Disney began producing direct-to-video sequels of its Feature Animation productions, the first of which was the Aladdin sequel The Return of Jafar. When Aladdin was selected as a possible candidate as an animated TV series (before the film's release), as with many animated series, the first three episodes were one multi-part story which Disney used as a potential 'family movie special' for the Friday night before the series' premiere. With work handed out to the Australia animation studio, the opening story was instead greenlit for a direct-to-video release. Thus with "Jafar" and its success, the direct-to-video unit, Disney Video Premieres, started. A second sequel, Aladdin and the King of Thieves, provided work to both the Sydney and Japanese animation units.[3]

Australia was assigned additional film sequels: The Lion King II: Simba's Pride, An Extremely Goofy Movie and Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure. The company's first feature film was Return to Never Land in 2002 grossing over $100 million worldwide at the box office. In 2005, the studio produced three animated movies: Tarzan II, Lilo & Stitch 2 and Bambi II. Disney Animation Australia was closed in mid-2006 after finishing Brother Bear 2, The Fox and the Hound 2, Cinderella III,[36] and The Little Mermaid: Ariel's Beginning.

Projects

Title Release type Release date Franchise Other production company(ies)[37]
The Return of Jafar Direct-to-video 20 May 1994 Aladdin Disney Video Premieres
Disney Animation Japan
A Goofy Movie Theatrical[38] April 7, 1995 Goofy
Aladdin and the King of Thieves Direct-to-video 13 August 1996 Aladdin Disney Video Premieres
Disney Animation Japan[1]
Pocahontas II: Journey to a New World Direct-to-video 25 August 1998 Pocahontas
  • Disney Video Premieres
  • Disney Animation Canada
  • Disney Animation Japan[39]
The Lion King II: Simba's Pride Direct-to-video 27 October 1998 The Lion King Disney Video Premieres
Disney Animation Canada
Hercules: Zero to Hero Direct-to-video 17 August 1999 Hercules
  • Walt Disney Television Animation
  • Walt Disney Animation Studios Strasbourg
  • Disney Animation Japan
An Extremely Goofy Movie Direct-to-video 29 February 2000 Goofy Disney Video Premieres[36]
Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure Direct-to-video[20] 27 February 2001 Lady and the Tramp Disney Video Premieres
Return to Never Land Theatrical[3] 15 February 2002 Peter Pan
  • Disney MovieToons
  • Disney Animation Canada
  • Disney Animation Japan[39]
  • Cornerstone Animation[40]
Tarzan & Jane Direct-to-video 23 July 2002 Tarzan
  • Walt Disney Television Animation
  • Walt Disney Animation Studios Strasbourg
Mickey's House of Villains Direct-to-video 3 September 2002 Mickey Mouse
  • Walt Disney Television Animation
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida, Inc.
The Jungle Book 2 Theatrical[3] 14 February 2003 The Jungle Book DisneyToon Studios
The Lion King 1½ Direct-to-video[3] 10 February 2004 The Lion King
Mickey, Donald, Goofy: The Three Musketeers Direct-to-video[3] 17 August 2004 Mickey Mouse
Tarzan II Direct-to-video 14 June 2005 Tarzan
Lilo & Stitch 2: Stitch Has a Glitch Direct-to-video 30 August 2005 Lilo & Stitch
Bambi II Direct-to-video/Theatrical 7 February 2006 Bambi
Brother Bear 2 Direct-to-video[29] 29 August 2006 Brother Bear
The Fox and the Hound 2 Direct-to-video[29] 11 December 2006 The Fox and the Hound
Cinderella III: A Twist in Time Direct-to-video 6 February 2007 Cinderella
The Little Mermaid: Ariel's Beginning Direct-to-video 26 August 2008 The Little Mermaid
The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh TV shows[36] 1988–1991 Winnie the Pooh Disney Television Animation
Darkwing Duck 1991–1992 DuckTales
Goof Troop 1992–1993 Goof
Bonkers 1993–1994 Raw Toonage
Aladdin 1994–1995 Aladdin
Timon & Pumbaa 1995–1999 Lion King
Quack Pack 1996 DuckTales
Jungle Cubs 1996-1998 Jungle Book

Disney Animation Canada

Walt Disney Animation Canada, Inc.
Disney Animation Canada
Company typeSubsidiary
IndustryEntertainment
Founded1996[39]
Defunct2000[39]
FateClosed[39]
Headquarters
Canada
Number of locations
2
Area served
Vancouver, British Columbia and Toronto, Ontario[34]
Production output
Animation
Number of employees
200 (2000)[41]
ParentWalt Disney Television Animation
(Walt Disney Feature Animation)

Walt Disney Animation Canada, Inc. (WDAC) was a Canadian animation production company and subsidiary of Disney Television Animation.[34]

Walt Disney Animation Canada was opened in January 1996 to tap Canada's animator pool and produce direct-to-video. Industry Canada rules were dispensed by the Canadian Government with a multi-year commitment from Disney for the company.[39]

WDAC produced in 1997 Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas then worked with Australia and Japan subcontractors on Pocahontas II: Journey to a New World.[39] In fall 1999, Animation Canada stopped work on Peter and Jane, a Peter Pan sequel original designed as its first theatrical release but was changed to a video release.[39] In Spring 2000, due to weak financial performance, Animation Canada was closed.[39][41] With Canada's closure, work on Peter and Jane was moved to the Australia and Japan units.[39]

Projects

Title Release type Release date Franchise Other production company(ies)
Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas Direct-to-video 11 November 1997 Beauty and the Beast for Disney Video Premieres
Pocahontas II: Journey to a New World Direct-to-video[34] 25 August 1998 Pocahontas
  • Disney Animation Australia
  • Disney Animation Japan
  • for Disney Video Premieres[39]
The Lion King II: Simba's Pride Direct-to-video 27 October 1998 The Lion King Disney Video Premieres
Disney Animation Australia
The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea Direct-to-video September 19, 2000 The Little Mermaid Disney Video Premiere[41]
Return to Never Land Theatrical[3] 15 February 2002 Peter Pan
  • Disney Animation Australia
  • for Disney MovieToons
  • Disney Animation Japan[39]
  • Cornerstone Animation[40]

Disney Animation France

Walt Disney Feature Animation, France S.A.
Disney Animation France
Formerly
  • Brizzi Films (1986–1989)
  • Walt Disney Animation France
  • (1989–1995)
Company typeSubsidiary
IndustryEntertainment
Founded1986[42]
FounderPaul and Gaëtan Brizzi[42]
Defunct2003[25]
FateClosed
Headquarters,
Key people
David Stainton
Production output
Animation
ParentWalt Disney Television Animation
(Walt Disney Feature Animation)

Walt Disney Feature Animation, France S.A. (DAF), also credited as Walt Disney Feature Animation - Paris, France[44] and Walt Disney Animation Studios - Strasbourg, France, originally named Brizzi Films, was an animation company based in Paris, France and Strasbourg, France that operated from 1986 to 2007.

Brizzi Films was founded by Paul and Gaëtan Brizzi in 1986, in Paris, France and Strasbourg, France. Brizzi worked on Babar in 1986 for Nelvana. In 1989, the Brizzi brothers sold the company to Disney Television Animation. The brothers continued on as general managers under the company's new name, Walt Disney Animation, France S.A.[42] The first production they work on under Disney was DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp for Disney MovieToons.[4] In 1990, WDA France worked on several TV shows and specials.[42]

In 1994, the Brizzi brothers transferred to Walt Disney Feature Animation as sequence directors for The Hunchback of Notre Dame[42] for which Disney France did 20 percent of the animation.[43] By January 1998, David Stainton was heading up Disney Animation France, which was when he was promoted to senior vice president of creative affairs for Disney Feature Animation.[45]

Stainton was promoted in January 2000, and moved to Walt Disney Television Animation.[45] In summer 2003, Disney Animation France was closed.[25]

Projects

Title Release type Release date Franchise Other production company(ies)
Babar: The Movie 28 July 1989 Produced for Nelvana as Brizzi Films[42]
DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp Theatrical[46] 3 August 1990 DuckTales for Disney MovieToons[4]
TaleSpin TV episodes 1990–91 The Jungle Book for Walt Disney Television Animation[42]
Winnie the Pooh and Christmas Too TV special 14 December 1991 Winnie the Pooh
Goof Troop TV episodes & specials 1992 Goofy
Marsupilami Special 1993
Bonkers Special 1993–94
A Goofy Movie Theatrical[38] 7 April 1995 Goofy
  • Disney MovieToons
  • Walt Disney Animation Australia
  • Phoenix Animation Studios
Runaway Brain Short film 11 August 1995 Mickey Mouse Walt Disney Feature Animation
Walt Disney Feature Animation, France S.A.
The Hunchback of Notre Dame Feature film 21 June 1996 The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida
[47]
Hercules Feature film (10 Minutes)[48] 27 June 1997 Hercules
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida
Tarzan Feature Film 18 June 1999 Tarzan Co-Produced with Walt Disney Feature Animation and Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida[49]
Fantasia 2000 Animated the Firebird Suite - 1919 Version Segment[50] 1 January 2000 Fantasia
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida
The Emperor's New Groove Feature film 15 December 2000 The Emperor's New Groove
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida
[51]
Atlantis: The Lost Empire Feature film 15 June 2001 Atlantis
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida
[52]
Lilo & Stitch Feature film 21 June 2002 Lilo & Stitch
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida
Winnie the Pooh: A Very Merry Pooh Year Direct-to-video 12 November 2002 Winnie the Pooh Walt Disney Television Animation
Treasure Planet Feature film 27 November 2002 Treasure Planet
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida
The Jungle Book 2 Feature Film 14 February 2003 The Jungle Book Walt Disney Animation Australia
Brother Bear Feature film 1 November 2003 Brother Bear
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation Florida

Disney Animation Japan

"Walt Disney Animation Japan" redirects here. Not to be confused with Walt Disney Animation Studios.

Walt Disney Animation (Japan) Inc.
Native name
ウォルト・ディズニー・アニメーション・ジャパン株式会社
ウォルト・ディズニー・テレビジョン・インターナショナル ジャパン
Kabushiki gaisha Woruto Dizunī Animēshon Japan
Woruto Dizunī Terebijon Intānashonaru Japan
FormerlyPacific Animation Corporation
Company typeSubsidiary
IndustryEntertainment
PredecessorTopcraft[53]
Founded1984; 40 years ago (1984)[53]
DefunctJune 2004 (2004-06)[54]
FateClosed
SuccessorThe Answer Studio Co. Ltd. [ja][54][55]
Walt Disney Japan
Headquarters,
Japan[56]
Key people
Motoyoshi Tokunaga (VP, GM)[55]
Production output
Animation
Number of employees
103 (2003)[25]
ParentDisney Television Animation

Walt Disney Animation Japan (ウォルト・ディズニー・アニメーション・ジャパン株式会社, Kabushiki gaisha Woruto Dizunī Animēshon Japan) (WDAJ), officially Walt Disney Animation (Japan) Inc., and formerly known as Pacific Animation Corporation (パシフィックアニメーション株式会社, Pashifikku animēshon kabushiki gaisha), also known as Walt Disney Television International Japan (ウォルト・ディズニー・テレビジョン・インターナショナル ジャパン, Woruto Dizunī Terebijon Intānashonaru Japan) (WDTVI-J), an animation production subsidiary of Disney Television Animation, a component of the Walt Disney Company, which is in charge of Disney's television business in Japan.

Pacific Animation Corporation was one of two animation firms that formed after the end of Topcraft in 1984, with the other being Studio Ghibli. Pacific Animation did three TV series and 1 television film for Rankin/Bass. In 1988, the Walt Disney Company purchased Pacific Animation Corporation, which was renamed as Walt Disney Animation Japan.[53]

The Japanese studio was set up to provide the animation services for Disney's animated television series in 1989.[34][57] As direct-to-video increased in importance, the overseas studios moved to making feature films.[34]

DAJ worked on The Tigger Movie (2000). In 2003, the company produced Piglet's Big Movie for DisneyToon Studios and 101 Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure. In September 2003, Disney announced the closure of the studio, with Pooh's Heffalump Movie (2004) to be its final work.[57][56]

DAJ was closed in June 2004 with 30 employees expected to be transferred to one of the two Disney's remaining animation units.[54] With the closure of the Japanese studio, its remaining work for DisneyToon Studios was split between its US and Australia animation units.[56] Employees not transferred decided to launch a new company, The Answer Studio [ja].[54][55]

Projects

Title Release type Release date Franchise Other production company(ies)
Pacific Animation[53]
Button Nose TV show episodes 1985 for Sanrio
The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus TV film 1985 for Rankin/Bass Productions
ThunderCats TV show episodes 1985
SilverHawks 1986
The Comic Strip 1987
Peppermint Rose TV special 1992 for Muller-Stratford Productions
Disney Animation Japan
Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears TV shows 1989-1990 Disney Television Animation
Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers 1989-1990
TaleSpin 1990-1991 The Jungle Book
Darkwing Duck 1991-1992
The Little Mermaid 1992 The Little Mermaid
Goof Troop 1992
Bonkers 1993 Raw Toonage
Aladdin 1994-1995 Aladdin
101 Dalmatians: The Series 1997 101 Dalmatians
Hercules 1998 Hercules
Buzz Lightyear of Star Command 2000 Toy Story
Gargoyles the Movie: The Heroes Awaken Direct-to-video January 31, 1995 Gargoyles
  • Walt Disney Television Animation
Aladdin and the King of Thieves Direct-to-video August 13, 1996 Aladdin Disney Animation Australia
Disney Video Premieres[1]
Pooh's Grand Adventure: The Search for Christopher Robin[34][58] Direct-to-video August 5, 1997 Winnie the Pooh Disney Video Premieres
Pocahontas II: Journey to a New World Direct-to-video[34] August 25, 1998 Pocahontas
  • Disney Animation Australia
  • Disney Animation Canada
  • Disney Video Premiere[39]
Hercules: Zero to Hero Direct-to-video August 17, 1999 Hercules
  • Disney Animation Australia
  • Walt Disney Animation Studios Strasbourg
  • Walt Disney Television Animation
The Tigger Movie[29][59] Theatrical February 11, 2000 Winnie the Pooh Walt Disney Television Animation[56]
Buzz Lightyear of Star Command: The Adventure Begins Direct-to-video August 8, 2000 Toy Story
Return to Never Land Theatrical[3] February 15, 2002 Peter Pan
  • Disney Animation Australia
  • Disney Animation Canada
  • Disney Movietoons[39]
  • Cornerstone Animation[40]
Cinderella II: Dreams Come True Direct-to-video February 26, 2002 Cinderella
  • Disney Video Premiere
  • Walt Disney Animation Studios Strasbourg
The Hunchback of Notre Dame II Direct-to-video March 19, 2002 The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • Disney Video Premiere
  • Walt Disney Animation Studios Strasbourg
101 Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure Direct-to-video January 21, 2003 101 Dalmatians Disney Video Premiere[55]
Piglet's Big Movie Theatrical[3][56] March 21, 2003 Winnie the Pooh DisneyToon Studios[56]
Pooh's Heffalump Movie February 11, 2005
Walt Disney Television International Japan
Fireball TV shows 2008
RoboDz Kazagumo Hen
Stitch! Lilo & Stitch

Disney Animation U.K.

Walt Disney Animation U.K., Ltd.
Disney Animation U.K.
Company typeSubsidiary
IndustryEntertainment
Founded1986
Defunct1991
FateClosed
Headquarters,
Production output
Animation
Parent

Walt Disney Animation U.K., Limited (DAE), was an animation studio based in England, Great Britain, United Kingdom that operated from 1986 to 1991.

This short-lived unit was set up in Camden Town, London in 1986 for the animation production of The Great Mouse Detective produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and Who Framed Roger Rabbit, using a combination of animators from Burbank, Richard Williams' associates and animators from all over Europe (many of whom would later join the prestigious Feature Animation unit in Burbank when Roger Rabbit had finished production). In 1990, the first production they worked on under Disney was DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp for Disney MovieToons and Walt Disney Animation, France S.A. In summer 1991, Disney Animation U.K. Limited; the last thing that the British animation studios ever animated were two episodes of TaleSpin and one episode of The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh.

Projects

Title Release type Release date Franchise Other production company(ies) Episode
Who Framed Roger Rabbit Theatrical 22 June 1988 Who Framed Roger Rabbit
DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp Theatrical 3 August 1990 DuckTales
The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh TV show 1990 Winnie the Pooh Disney Television Animation "April Pooh"
TaleSpin TV show 1991 The Jungle Book
"Pizza Pie in the Sky" and "The Incredible Shrinking Molly"

Walt Disney Animation Studios Vancouver

Walt Disney Animation Studios Vancouver
Company typeDivision
IndustryEntertainment
FoundedAugust 2021
Headquarters,
Key people
Amir Nasrabadi (Head of Studio)
Production output
Animation
ParentWalt Disney Animation Studios
(Walt Disney Studios)

Walt Disney Animation Studios Vancouver is a division of Walt Disney Animation Studios. The division was open on August 4, 2021, and began operations in January 2022.[61] Amir Nasrabadi, former finance lead at Disney Animation, will be the head of the studio.[61] The studio will work on Disney Animation's future long-term series, specials, and movies with its first work being the upcoming Moana sequel.[61]

Projects

Release date Title Notes
2023 Once Upon a Studio Co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios
2024 Iwájú Co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios, Kugali Media, and Cinesite
Tiana Co-produced with Walt Disney Animation Studios
Moana 2

ImageMovers Digital

In 2007, The Walt Disney Company and ImageMovers set up a joint venture animation facility, ImageMovers Digital, a Marin County-based film company, where Robert Zemeckis would produce and direct 3D animated films using performance capture technology.[2] ImageMovers Digital closed operations by January 2011, after the production was completed on Mars Needs Moms.[62]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Original name for the Walt Disney Company, founded in Burbank, Hollywood, by Walt Disney and Roy Disney.
  2. ^ 2nd name for the Walt Disney Company
  3. ^ 3rd & original incorporation name for Walt Disney Studios partnership
  4. ^ name for the main feature theatrical animation division
  5. ^ subdivision of the main feature animation studio, founded to produce sequels to individual Pixar films owned by Disney before acquiring Pixar outright in 2006. No films were ever released by this division.

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