Rowing New Zealand
SportRowing
Founded1887
AffiliationInternational Rowing Federation
Official website
www.rowingnz.com
New Zealand

Rowing New Zealand is the sports governing body for rowing in New Zealand. Its purpose is to provide leadership and support to enable an environment of success for the New Zealand rowing community. This includes secondary schools, clubs, masters, universities and high performance.[1]

Rowing New Zealand was founded as the New Zealand Amateur Rowing Association on 16 March 1887. The New Zealand Amateur Rowing Association was formed by nine clubs in an effort to coordinate and regulate the sport of amateur rowing in New Zealand.[2]

Since the turn of the 21st century, Rowing New Zealand has had moderate success on the water, which has resulted in increased media interest in the sport of rowing and record participation at secondary school level. The aim is eventually to replicate the success of Great Britain and Australia on the water by the 2020 Olympics. This increase in the number of active rowers has been attributed in particular to Rob Waddell's gold medal victory at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney. There have also been increases, particularly in the number of women rowers, since Georgina Evers-Swindell and Caroline Evers-Swindell won gold at the 2004 Athens Olympic Games.

The 2008 Olympic trials gained intense public and media interest as previous Olympic champion Rob Waddell challenged current world champion Mahé Drysdale for the sole men’s single sculls spot. In the final race, Waddell suffered a repeat of his atrial fibrillation condition, resulting in Drysdale claiming the victory and the sole 2008 Olympic single sculls spot.[3]

Waddell was then selected into the double sculls with the young Nathan Cohen, world champion at the 2006 World University Games in single sculls, in early 2008. At the 2008 Summer Olympics in Shunyi Olympic Rowing-Canoeing Park, Shunyi, Beijing in August 2008, the two finished fourth in the double sculls final.[4][5][6]

Cohen won the gold medal in double sculls at the next Olympic Games in 2012, with rowing partner Joseph Sullivan.[7]

Cohen and Sullivan also won the World Championship in both 2010 and 2011.[8]

Membership

Sixty-eight clubs are affiliated to Rowing New Zealand. Clubs within New Zealand are affiliated to their regional rowing associations, which include the Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Canterbury, East Coast, Marlborough, Otago, Southland, Waikato, Whanganui and Wellington Rowing Associations.

Other members affiliated with Rowing New Zealand include the New Zealand Secondary Schools Rowing Association (NZSSRA), the New Zealand Universities Rowing Council, the New Zealand Rowing Race Officials Association, Regional Performance Centres (RPCs), Karapiro Rowing and Ruataniwha Rowing. RPCs provide a pathway for rowers to compete for selection in national representative crews as well as providing a high performance training environment for rowers.[1] Karapiro Rowing and Ruataniwha Rowing operate and maintain the country's two main rowing venues: Lake Karapiro near Cambridge in the North Island, and Lake Ruataniwha near Twizel in the South Island.

Events

National teams

Rowing New Zealand selects Elite, Development, Under 23, Under 21, Junior and Under 18 National Teams through selection camps and trials process. The Elite National Team represents New Zealand at the highest level of competition, either at the Olympic Games, World Championships or the Rowing World Cup. While the Olympics are held once every four years, the World Championships are held every year. The Rowing World Cup comprises 3 regattas held each year and overall winners are determined by points that are awarded to the top finishing boats at each event.

The Under 23 National Team competes at the Under 23 World Championship regatta each year while the Under 21 National Team competes at the Youth Cup Regatta in Australia. The Junior National Team competes at the Junior World Championships each year and the Under 18 crews from the North Island and the South Island are selected annually to compete against one another.

Results

2010 World Championship Regatta

Rowing New Zealand hosted the 2010 World Championship Regatta at Lake Karapiro, 12–19 September. New Zealand secured the rights to hold the 39th World Rowing Championship in 2006 and, in doing so, became one of only a handful of world rowing nations that have held more than one championship. At the official Closing Ceremony, FISA President Denis Oswald said: "I praise the Organising Committee for having staged such an outstanding event and I include all members of the Organising Committee and volunteers who have been so helpful and friendly to us. It won't take 32 years until we come back. Karapiro 2010 brought the World Championships to new standards and set a new model."

The first time the event came to New Zealand was in 1978. The 2010 event joins the 1978 event as being considered by many of the rowing community worldwide as being amongst the greatest ever world championships.[11]

2005 World Championship Regatta

The 2005 World Championship Regatta was one of the most successful event for Rowing New Zealand and New Zealand sport when four gold medals were won within 45 minutes, making New Zealand the most successful country at the regatta. The four victories were:

[12]

Olympic medallists

Medal Olympics Event Crew members
Bronze 1920 Antwerp Men's Single Sculls Darcy Hadfield
Silver 1932 Los Angeles Men's Coxless pair Cyril Stiles; Rangi Thompson
Gold 1968 Mexico Men's coxed Four Dick Joyce; Dudley Storey; Ross Collinge; Warren Cole; Simon Dickie
Gold 1972 Munich Men's Eight Tony Hurt; Wybo Veldman; Dick Joyce; John Hunter; Lindsay Wilson; Joe Earl; Trevor Coker; Gary Robertson; Simon Dickie
Silver 1972 Munich Men's coxless Four Dick Tonks; Dudley Storey; Ross Collinge; Noel Mills
Bronze 1976 Montreal Men's Eight Ivan Sutherland; Trevor Coker; Peter Dignan; Lindsay Wilson; Joe Earl; Dave Rodger; Alec McLean; Tony Hurt; Simon Dickie
Gold 1984 Los Angeles Men's coxless Four Les O'Connell; Shane O'Brien; Conrad Robertson; Keith Trask
Bronze 1984 Los Angeles Men's coxed Four Kevin Lawton; Don Symon; Barrie Mabbott; Ross Tong; Brett Hollister
Bronze 1988 Seoul Men's coxed Four George Keys; Ian Wright; Greg Johnston; Chris White; Andrew Bird
Bronze 1988 Seoul Women's coxless Pair Nikki Payne; Lynley Hannen
Bronze 1988 Seoul Men's Single Sculls Eric Verdonk
Gold 2000 Sydney Men's Single Sculls Rob Waddell
Gold 2004 Athens Women's Double Sculls Georgina Evers-Swindell; Caroline Evers-Swindell
Gold 2008 Beijing Women's double sculls Georgina Evers-Swindell; Caroline Evers-Swindell
Bronze 2008 Beijing Men's Single Sculls Mahé Drysdale
Bronze 2008 Beijing Men's coxless pair Nathan Twaddle ; George Bridgewater
Gold 2012 London Men's double sculls Nathan Cohen; Joseph Sullivan
Gold 2012 London Men's coxless pair Eric Murray ; Hamish Bond
Gold 2012 London Men's single sculls Mahé Drysdale
Bronze 2012 London Men's lightweight double sculls Storm Uru, Peter Taylor
Bronze 2012 London Women's coxless pair Juliette Haigh, Rebecca Scown
Gold 2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's coxless pair Hamish Bond, Eric Murray
Gold 2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's single sculls Mahé Drysdale
Silver 2016 Rio de Janeiro Women's coxless pair Genevieve Behrent, Rebecca Scown
Silver 2020 Tokyo Women's double sculls Brooke Donoghue, Hannah Osborne
Gold 2020 Tokyo Women's coxless pair Grace Prendergast, Kerri Gowler
Silver 2020 Tokyo Women's eight Ella Greenslade, Emma Dyke, Lucy Spoors, Kelsey Bevan, Grace Prendergast, Kerri Gowler, Beth Ross, Jackie Gowler, Caleb Shepherd
Gold 2020 Tokyo Women's single sculls Emma Twigg
Gold 2020 Tokyo Men's eight Tom Mackintosh, Hamish Bond, Tom Murray, Michael Brake, Dan Williamson, Phillip Wilson, Shaun Kirkham, Matt MacDonald, Sam Bosworth

[13]

World champions

World championship regatta Event Crew members
1998 – Cologne, Germany Men’s single sculls Rob Waddell
1999 – St Catherine's, Canada Men’s single sculls Rob Waddell
2002 – Sevilla, Spain Women’s double sculls Georgina Evers-Swindell, Caroline Evers-Swindell
2003 – Milan, Italy Women’s double sculls Georgina Evers-Swindell, Caroline Evers-Swindell
2005 – Gifu, Japan Men's single sculls Mahé Drysdale
2005 – Gifu, Japan Women's coxless pair Juliette Haigh, Nicky Coles
2005 – Gifu, Japan Men's coxless pair George Bridgewater, Nathan Twaddle
2005 – Gifu, Japan Women's double sculls Georgina Evers-Swindell, Caroline Evers-Swindell
2006 – Eton, England Men’s single sculls Mahé Drysdale
2007 – Munich, Germany Men’s single sculls Mahé Drysdale
2007 – Munich, Germany Men’s coxless four Hamish Bond, Eric Murray, James Dallinger, Carl Meyer
2007 – Munich, Germany Men’s lightweight single sculls Duncan Grant
2008 – Linz, Austria Men’s lightweight single sculls Duncan Grant[14]
2009 – Poznan, Poland Men’s single Sculls Mahé Drysdale[14]
2009 – Poznan, Poland Men’s lightweight single Sculls Duncan Grant
2009 – Poznan, Poland Men’s lightweight double sculls Peter Taylor, Storm Uru[14]
2009 – Poznan, Poland Men's Coxless Pair Eric Murray, Hamish Bond
2010 – Lake Karapiro, New Zealand Men’s double sculls Nathan Cohen, Joseph Sullivan
2010 – Lake Karapiro, New Zealand Men's Coxless Pair Eric Murray, Hamish Bond
2010 – Lake Karapiro, New Zealand Women's Coxless Pair Juliette Haigh, Rebecca Scown
2011 – Bled, Slovenia Men’s single Sculls Mahé Drysdale
2011 – Bled, Slovenia Men’s double sculls Nathan Cohen, Joseph Sullivan
2011 – Bled, Slovenia Men's Coxless Pair Eric Murray, Hamish Bond
2011 – Bled, Slovenia Women's Coxless Pair Juliette Haigh, Rebecca Scown
2013 World Rowing Championships - Chungju Men's Coxless Pair Eric Murray, Hamish Bond
2014 World Rowing Championships - Amsterdam Men's Coxless Pair Eric Murray, Hamish Bond
2014 World Rowing Championships - Amsterdam Men's Coxed Pair Eric Murray, Hamish Bond, Caleb Shepherd
2014 World Rowing Championships - Amsterdam Women’s single Sculls Emma Twigg
2014 World Rowing Championships - Amsterdam Women’s double sculls Fiona Bourke, Zoe Stevenson
2014 World Rowing Championships - Amsterdam Women's Coxless Four Kayla Pratt, Kelsey Bevan, Grace Prendergrast, Kerri Gowler
2014 World Rowing Championships - Amsterdam Women’s lightweight double sculls Sophie MacKenzie, Julia Edwards
2015 World Rowing Championships - Aiguebelette Men's Coxless Pair Eric Murray, Hamish Bond
2015 World Rowing Championships - Aiguebelette Men's lightweight single sculls Adam Ling
2015 World Rowing Championships - Aiguebelette Women’s double sculls Eve MacFarlane, Zoe Stevenson
2015 World Rowing Championships - Aiguebelette Women’s lightweight single sculls Zoe McBride
2015 World Rowing Championships - Aiguebelette Women’s lightweight double sculls Sophie MacKenzie, Julia Edwards
2016 World Rowing Championships - Rotterdam Women’s lightweight single sculls Zoe McBride
2017 World Rowing Championships - Sarasota Men’s double sculls John Storey, Chris Harris
2017 World Rowing Championships - Sarasota Women’s double sculls Brooke Donoghue, Olivia Loe
2017 World Rowing Championships - Sarasota Women’s Coxless Pair Grace Prendergast, Kerri Gowler
2019 World Rowing Championships - Ottensheim Women’s double sculls Brooke Donoghue, Olivia Loe
2019 World Rowing Championships - Ottensheim Women’s Coxless Pair Grace Prendergast, Kerri Gowler
2019 World Rowing Championships - Ottensheim Women’s Coxed Eight Ella Greenslade, Emma Dyke, Lucy Spoors, Kelsey Bevan, Grace Prendergast, Kerri Gowler, Elizabeth Ross, Jackie Gowler, Caleb Shepherd

References

  1. ^ a b "Rowing New Zealand". Rowing New Zealand. 2008. Archived from the original on 14 October 2008. Retrieved 15 March 2008.
  2. ^ McLintock, A. H., ed. (1966). "Rowing". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. Ministry for Culture and Heritage / Te Manatū Taonga. Archived from the original on 15 August 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2021.
  3. ^ Rowing New Zealand. (2008) News. Retrieved 15 March 2008, from http://www.rowingnz.com
  4. ^ "Rowing at the 2008 Beijing Summer Games: Men's Double Sculls | Olympics". Sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 18 April 2020. Retrieved 30 October 2013.
  5. ^ Savory, Logan (21 March 2012). "Rower Nathan Cohen has eye on Olympic prize". Stuff. Retrieved 30 October 2013.
  6. ^ Anderson, Ian (27 December 2011). "Rowing duo Cohen, Sullivan eye London Olympics". Stuff. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 30 October 2013.
  7. ^ "Rowing at the 2012 London Summer Games: Men's Double Sculls | Olympics". Sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 18 April 2020. Retrieved 30 October 2013.
  8. ^ Savory, Logan (21 March 2012). "Rower Nathan Cohen has eye on Olympic prize". Stuff. Retrieved 21 April 2016.
  9. ^ University Rowing New Zealand. (2008). Retrieved 25 March 2008, from http://www.universityrowing.org.nz/
  10. ^ NZSSRA. (2008). Aon Maadi Cup Regatta. Retrieved 15 March 2008, from http://www.schoolrowing.org.nz/maadi.php
  11. ^ World Rowing Championships. (2008). 2010 World Rowing Championships, New Zealand Retrieved 19 March 2008, from http://www.wrch2010.com Archived 23 March 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  12. ^ "Rowing: Return of the fern". The New Zealand Herald. 8 September 2005. Retrieved 6 November 2011.
  13. ^ International Olympic Committee. (2008). Olympic Medal Winners. Retrieved 21 March 2008, from http://www.olympic.org/uk/athletes/results/search_r_uk.asp
  14. ^ a b c World Rowing. (2008). Results Database. Retrieved 21 March 2008, from http://www.worldrowing.com/results_bios/results_bios.php