Barrie Mabbott
Personal information
Birth nameJames Barrie Mabbott
Born19 November 1960 (1960-11-19) (age 61)[1]
Carterton, New Zealand
Height195 cm (6 ft 5 in)[1]
Weight90 kg (198 lb)[1]
Sport
SportRowing
ClubNorth Shore Rowing Club[1]

James Barrie Mabbott (born 19 November 1960) is a former New Zealand rower who won an Olympic bronze medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.

Biography

Mabbott was born in 1960 in Carterton.[2][3] He began rowing at Westlake Boys High School in the Auckland suburb of Forrest Hill, the same school as fellow Olympic Bronze medallist Eric Verdonk. Mabbott was selected in the coxed four at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow but did not compete due to the Olympics boycott.[3] At the 1983 World Rowing Championships at Wedau in Duisburg, Germany, he won a gold medal with the New Zealand eight in seat six.[4] At the 1984 Olympics, Mabbott won the bronze medal in the coxed four along with Don Symon, Kevin Lawton, Ross Tong and Brett Hollister (cox).[5] Mabbott competed at the 1986 Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh winning a silver medal with Ian Wright in the coxless pair and a bronze medal in the eights.[6] He is listed as New Zealand Olympian athlete number 463 by the New Zealand Olympic Committee.[3] Mabbott is Rowing New Zealand's high performance commissioner.[3]

Mabbott is married to Gillian. He used to be a part-owner of a crane and construction hire business.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill; et al. "Barrie Mabbott". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on 18 April 2020. Retrieved 7 November 2016.
  2. ^ "Barrie Mabbott". International Rowing Federation. Retrieved 4 October 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Barrie Mabbott". New Zealand Olympic Committee. Retrieved 7 November 2016.
  4. ^ "Men's Eight - Final". FISA. Retrieved 4 October 2015.
  5. ^ "Men's Coxed Four - Final". FISA. Retrieved 4 October 2015.
  6. ^ "Edinburgh 1986 Commonwealth Games". New Zealand Olympic Committee. Retrieved 29 October 2016.