The Left
Déi Lénk
LeaderCollective leadership
Founded30 January 1999
Headquarters5, rue Aldringen, Luxembourg
Youth wingJonk Lénk
IdeologyDemocratic socialism
Political positionLeft-wing[1][2][3]
European affiliationPEL
European Parliament groupGUE/NGL
Colours  Red
Chamber of Deputies
2 / 60
European Parliament
0 / 6
Local councils
8 / 600
Website
dei-lenk.lu

The Left (Luxembourgish: Déi Lénk [dəɪ ˈleŋk]; French: La Gauche; German: Die Linken) is a democratic socialist[4][5] political party in Luxembourg.[6] The Left is associated with The Left in the European Parliament – GUE/NGL group in the European Parliament but does not have any members. The party participates in the Party of the European Left,[7] and is positioned on the left wing of the political spectrum.[8]

The Left was founded by the New Left and the Communist Party of Luxembourg (KPL) as an electoral party. It had members from both parties and independents.[9] In the 1999 Luxembourg general election, the Left won 3.3% of the votes and one seat in the parliament; André Hoffmann was elected from the southern constituency. In 2000, after anticipated elections in the city of Esch sur Alzette, Hoffmann became deputy mayor and Aloyse Bisdorff (KPL) succeeded him in parliament. In accordance with the Left's statutes, Bisdorff resigned from parliament and was succeeded by Serge Urbany in 2002. A dispute arose between a number of members of the KPL and the majority of the Left, and the two parties ran separate lists in the 2004 Luxembourg general election. The Left won 1.9% of the votes and lost its parliamentary presence. In the 2009 Luxembourg general election, it increased its share of the vote to 3.3% and Hoffmann returned to parliament as the Left's sole representative; Hoffmann's personal vote of 9,067 in the south constituency was almost equal to the total number of votes gathered by the KPL, which won 10,803 votes.[10] In 2013, the party elected two members (Serge Urbany and Justin Turpel).

Election results

Parliament

Election Votes % Seats +/– Government
1999 110,274 3.3 (6th)
1 / 60
Opposition
2004 62,071 1.9 (6th)
0 / 60
Decrease 1 Extra-parliamentary
2009 109,184 3.3 (6th)
1 / 60
Increase 1 Opposition
2013 161,759 4.5 (6th)
2 / 60
Increase 1 Opposition
2018 193,594 5.5 (7th)
2 / 60
Steady Opposition
Constituency 2013
votes
% 2009
votes
% 2004
votes
% 1999
votes
%
Centre 51,851 5.75 35,411 3.50 20,451 1.99 27,999 2.82
East 5,941 3.05 3,911 2.25 2,179 1.31 2,448 1.63
North 8,138 2.56 5,785 2.00 3,725 1.34 3,653 1.41
South 95,829 5.73 64,077 4.13 36,868 2.28 76,174 4.98

European Parliament

Election Votes % Seats +/–
1999 28,130 2.8
0 / 6
2004 18,345 1.7
0 / 6
Steady 0
2009 37,929 3.4
0 / 6
Steady 0
2014 67,513 5.8
0 / 6
Steady 0
2019 60,648 4.8
0 / 6
Steady 0

References

  1. ^ Lambert, Yannick; Oglesby, Kate (16 December 2021). "Parliament approves tighter laws targeting unvaccinated". Luxembourg Times. Retrieved 15 February 2022. Three opposition parties - the right-wing Alternative Democratic Reform party, the left-wing déi Lénk and the Pirate party - all voted against Prime Minister Xavier Bettel’s proposals.
  2. ^ "Luxembourg". Europe Elects. Retrieved 15 February 2022.
  3. ^ Carette, Julien (6 October 2021). "The government "lacks courage" for déi Lénk". Delano. Retrieved 15 February 2022.
  4. ^ Nordsieck, Wolfram (2018). "Luxembourg". Parties and Elections in Europe. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  5. ^ Abrahamian, Atossa (15 September 2017). "How a tax haven is leading the race to privatise space". The Guardian. Retrieved 15 February 2022. The next day, I went to meet Marc Baum, an MP from the democratic socialist party déi Lénk (the Left).
  6. ^ Quotidien, Le. "[Communales] Déi Lénk: " L'original plutôt que la copie "" (in French). Retrieved 2021-10-25.
  7. ^ EL-Parties. European Left. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  8. ^ Josep M. Colomer (24 July 2008). Comparative European Politics. Taylor & Francis. pp. 221–. ISBN 978-0-203-94609-1. Retrieved 13 July 2013.
  9. ^ Wagener, Sascha (2009). "The Left in Luxemburg" (PDF). Daiber, Birgit/Hildebrandt, Cornelia, the Left in Europe. Political Parties AndParty Alliances Between Norway and Turkey: 30–40. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  10. ^ Netgen, Éric (2009-06-11). "Empire of the Census". Le Jeudi. Archived from the original on 2009-06-15. Retrieved 2009-06-27.

Bibliography