Bolton, Connecticut
Town of Bolton
Bolton Green Historic District
Official seal of Bolton, Connecticut
Motto: 
"A Town for All Seasons"
Bolton's location within Tolland County and Connecticut
Bolton's location within the Capitol Planning Region and the state of Connecticut
Map
Map
Map
Coordinates: 41°45′51″N 72°26′15″W / 41.76417°N 72.43750°W / 41.76417; -72.43750
Country United States
U.S. state Connecticut
CountyTolland
RegionCapitol Region
Incorporated1720
Government
 • TypeSelectman-town meeting
 • First selectmanPam Sawyer (R)
 • SelectmenRobert R. Morra (R)
Michael W. Eremita (R)
Kimberly A. Miller (D)
Nicole Sullivan (D)
Area
 • Total14.7 sq mi (38.1 km2)
 • Land14.4 sq mi (37.3 km2)
 • Water0.3 sq mi (0.8 km2)
Elevation
728 ft (222 m)
Population
 (2020)[1]
 • Total4,858
 • Density330/sq mi (130/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (Eastern)
ZIP Code
06043
Area code(s)860/959
FIPS code09-06260
GNIS feature ID0213393
List of auxiliary Interstate Highways
U.S. Highways
State Routes
Websitetown.boltonct.org

Bolton (/ˈbltən/ BOHL-tən) is a small suburban town in the Capitol Planning Region, Connecticut, United States. The population was 4,858 as of the 2020 census.[2] Bolton was incorporated in October 1720 and is governed by town meeting, with a first selectman and board of selectman as well as other boards serving specific functions. Bolton was named after a town of the same name in England, also located near Manchester.[3]

History

Encampment site with Rose's Farm in background

Originally part of the town of Hartford, the area was referred to as Hartford Mountains or Hanover, until incorporation in October 1720. On 11 November 1723, Jonathan Edwards was installed as the pastor of Bolton.[4]

Bolton was known for its high quality schist stone in the 18th century, and many tombstone carvers such as Gershom Bartlett and Jonathan Loomis sourced their stone from Bolton quarries.

Bolton was removed from Hartford County when Tolland County was originally formed on 13 October 1785. The northern half of Bolton was set aside in 1808 to form the town of Vernon. Quarries played a significant role in the area's developing economy, and Bolton Notch became the location of the small community of Quarryville. Prior to the railroad, granite was taken by oxcart to the Connecticut River where it was then shipped to major cities on the East Coast.

The Bolton historical society has been actively purchasing sites throughout the town in their effort to preserve the town's history and rural character. The most recent of these purchases was Rose's Farm, a several hundred-acre site where the Comte de Rochambeau camped with his troops.

Bolton has several restrictive ordinances designed to protect high housing prices for existing home owners and restrict new construction. Ordinances protecting existing businesses from competition also exist, such as those limiting the types and number of businesses. There is also a requirement that all new residential lots be no smaller than 1 acre, further keeping house prices artificially higher than they otherwise would likely be. The town features numerous parks, open spaces and trails.[5]

Interstate 84 was originally planned to cut through the town on its way to Providence, going through Bolton Notch and the Hop River valley. Due to environmental concerns in both Rhode Island and in the Hop River valley, the highway would be cancelled in 1983. The segment that was built beforehand in the northwestern section of town, from CT 85 to US 6/US 44 would be redesignated at Interstate 384.[6][7]

Bolton today is primarily residential with an economy made up mostly of small businesses. It is part of the Greater Hartford metro and contains many suburban homes, especially in its western side.

Climate

Bolton, like much of Tolland County, straddles the humid continental climate (Dfa) and (Dfb) line.

Climate data for Bolton, Connecticut
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 64
(18)
69
(21)
83
(28)
93
(34)
92
(33)
96
(36)
97
(36)
96
(36)
96
(36)
86
(30)
78
(26)
71
(22)
97
(36)
Mean daily maximum °F (°C) 35
(2)
38
(3)
47
(8)
58
(14)
69
(21)
76
(24)
81
(27)
80
(27)
72
(22)
62
(17)
51
(11)
40
(4)
59
(15)
Mean daily minimum °F (°C) 13
(−11)
15
(−9)
24
(−4)
33
(1)
43
(6)
52
(11)
57
(14)
56
(13)
46
(8)
35
(2)
29
(−2)
20
(−7)
35
(2)
Record low °F (°C) −32
(−36)
−27
(−33)
−24
(−31)
4
(−16)
20
(−7)
27
(−3)
34
(1)
28
(−2)
19
(−7)
13
(−11)
−5
(−21)
−19
(−28)
−32
(−36)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 4.38
(111)
3.11
(79)
4.32
(110)
4.54
(115)
3.96
(101)
4.25
(108)
4.08
(104)
4.07
(103)
4.54
(115)
4.56
(116)
4.64
(118)
4.02
(102)
50.47
(1,282)
Source: The Weather Channel (Historical Monthly Averages)[8]

Education

Bolton High School is a public school with about two to three hundred students. It underwent major renovations and expansion during 2011, including a new outdoor seating area for the cafeteria, a larger and more technologically advanced library, computer labs and media center, and a new science wing and larger administrative offices. Several other improvements were made including parking, bus lanes and the board of education offices being moved to the location.

The school has a student-teacher ratio of about 12:1 and a combined math and reading proficiency level of 92.5%.[9] U.S. News & World Report ranked it #27 in Connecticut and #1030 in the United States, and it earned a Silver Award in 2012.[10]

Bolton High is affiliated with the NCCC athletic conference.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 14.7 square miles (38 km2), of which, 14.4 square miles (37 km2) is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2) (1.91%) is water. This includes the Bolton Green Historic District and may include land owned or leased by the State of Connecticut and the U.S. federal government. Bolton doesn't have any unincorporated land.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1820731
1850600
186068313.8%
1870576−15.7%
1880512−11.1%
1890452−11.7%
19004571.1%
1910433−5.3%
19204483.5%
193050412.5%
194072844.4%
19501,27975.7%
19602,933129.3%
19703,69125.8%
19803,9517.0%
19904,57515.8%
20005,0179.7%
20104,980−0.7%
20204,858−2.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]

See also: List of Connecticut locations by per capita income

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,980 people, 1,915 households, and 1,438 families residing in the town.[12] The town's residents are primarily middle-class, with some working class and upper middle-class families/individuals and small businesses. There are also a few larger commercial entities, notably the Simoniz corporation, specializing in automotive and car wash cleaning supplies.

The population density in 2010 was 346 people per square mile (133.5/km2). There were 2,015 housing units in the town, of which 100, or 5.0%, were vacant. 86.7% of the occupied units are owned and 13.3% are rented.[12]

The racial makeup of the town was 95.7% White, 1.1% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.4% Asian, 0.2% some other race, and 1.5% two or more races. 3.00% of the population identified as Latino or Hispanic of any race (the US Census Bureau does not consider Latino a race).[12]

The median age in 2010 was 45.4. 49.4% of the population were male and 50.6% female.[12]

For the period 2012–2016, the estimated median household income was $91,087, and the median family income was $118,958. About 3.2% of the population are living below the poverty line.[13]

Voter registration and party enrollment as of 29 October 2019[14]
Party Active voters Inactive voters Total voters Percentage
Democratic 1,047 68 1,115 29.84%
Republican 975 63 1,038 27.78%
Unaffiliated 1,408 109 1,517 40.60%
Minor Parties 59 7 66 1.76%
Total 3,489 247 3,736 100%
Presidential Election Results[15][16]
Year Democratic Republican Third Parties
2020 52.5% 1,727 45.1% 1,482 2.4% 79
2016 46.4% 1,385 48.0% 1,436 5.6% 169
2012 49.24% 1,433 49.26% 1,434 1.5% 44
2008 55.7% 1,692 42.6% 1,300 1.7% 54
2004 50.5% 1,542 47.7% 1,459 1.8% 56
2000 49.3% 1,368 45.0% 1,210 5.7% 159
1996 47.6% 1,210 37.9% 964 14.5% 369
1992 36.7% 1,023 34.9% 976 28.4% 792
1988 42.7% 972 55.9% 1,278 1.4% 33
1984 32.8% 699 66.9% 1,430 0.3% 8
1980 33.5% 665 48.5% 964 18.0% 359
1976 42.5% 817 57.0% 1,097 0.5% 10
1972 35.1% 668 64.2% 1,226 0.7% 15
1968 38.8% 630 55.4% 904 5.8% 96
1964 59.5% 859 40.5% 586 0.00% 0
1960 37.3% 524 62.7% 880 0.00% 0
1956 26.0% 311 74.0% 888 0.00% 0

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Bolton town, Tolland County, Connecticut". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2018.
  2. ^ "Census - Geography Profile: Bolton town, Tolland County, Connecticut". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 26, 2021.
  3. ^ The Connecticut Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly. Connecticut Magazine Company. 1903. p. 331. Archived from the original on April 27, 2018.
  4. ^ George M. Marsden (July 11, 2004). Jonathan Edwards: A Life. Yale University Press. p. 95. ISBN 978-0-300-10596-4. Retrieved October 17, 2010.
  5. ^ Town Resident
  6. ^ "Connecticut I-384". www.kurumi.com. Retrieved February 27, 2023.
  7. ^ "From Hartford to Providence". www.kurumi.com. Retrieved February 27, 2023.
  8. ^ "Climate Statistics for Bolton, CT". Archived from the original on January 6, 2014. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  9. ^ "Bolton High School in Bolton, CT | US News Best High Schools". Archived from the original on March 30, 2017. Retrieved August 24, 2017.
  10. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on August 31, 2013. Retrieved August 17, 2013.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  12. ^ a b c d "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Bolton town, Tolland County, Connecticut". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2018.
  13. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics: 2012-2016 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates (DP03): Bolton town, Tolland County, Connecticut". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2018.
  14. ^ "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 29, 2019" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  15. ^ "General Election Statements of Vote, 1922 – Current". CT Secretary of State. Retrieved July 10, 2020.
  16. ^ "Election Night Reporting". CT Secretary of State. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  17. ^ "Aloysius J. Ahearn obituary". Hartford Courant. May 5, 2020. Archived from the original on May 25, 2020. Retrieved May 25, 2020.