Burlington, Connecticut
Elton Tavern
Elton Tavern
Official seal of Burlington, Connecticut
Motto(s): 
"A Town Where Community Counts"
Location within Hartford County, Connecticut
Location within Hartford County, Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°45′31″N 72°57′28″W / 41.75861°N 72.95778°W / 41.75861; -72.95778Coordinates: 41°45′31″N 72°57′28″W / 41.75861°N 72.95778°W / 41.75861; -72.95778
Country United States
U.S. state Connecticut
CountyHartford
Metropolitan areaHartford
Incorporated1806
HamletsBurlington
Covey Corners
Lake Garda
Whigville
Government
 • TypeSelectman-town meeting
 • First SelectmanDouglas Thompson (R)[1]
 • SelectmenJames A. Chard (R)
Thomas E. Zabel (D)
Cheryl K. Byrne (R)
David Goshdigian (D)
Area
 • Total30.4 sq mi (78.8 km2)
 • Land29.7 sq mi (77.0 km2)
 • Water0.7 sq mi (1.7 km2)
Elevation
883 ft (269 m)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total9,519
 • Density320.2/sq mi (123.6/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
06013
Area code(s)860
FIPS code09-10100
GNIS feature ID0213401
U.S. RoutesConnecticut Highway 4.svg
Websitewww.burlingtonct.us

Burlington is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States.

Situated at the foot of the Berkshires and bordering the Farmington River, Burlington is a scenic hill town, rural in nature, located 20 miles (32 km) west of Hartford. Incorporated in 1806, the population was 9,519 at the 2020 census.[2] Burlington is home to the State of Connecticut Fish Hatchery, the Nepaug Reservoir, and Sessions Woods Wildlife Management Area. Almost half of the land in the town is owned by three public water supply companies and the State of Connecticut.

History

The area that includes present-day Bristol was originally inhabited by the Tunxis Native American tribe, who spoke an Algonquian language.[3]

The town was once part of larger Farmington Plantation. In 1785, it split away and became a part of the town of Bristol. In 1806, Burlington separated from Bristol and became a town in its own right.[4]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 30.4 square miles (78.8 km2), of which 29.7 square miles (77.0 km2) is land and 0.66 square miles (1.7 km2), or 2.19%, is water.[5]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18201,360
18501,161
18601,031−11.2%
18701,31927.9%
18801,224−7.2%
18901,3026.4%
19001,218−6.5%
19101,3198.3%
19201,109−15.9%
19301,082−2.4%
19401,24615.2%
19501,84648.2%
19602,79051.1%
19704,07045.9%
19805,66039.1%
19907,02624.1%
20008,19016.6%
20109,30113.6%
20209,5192.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]

See also: List of Connecticut locations by per capita income

As of the census[7] of 2010, there were 9,326 people, 3,303 households, and 2,691 families residing in the town. The racial makeup of the town was 96.5% White, 0.6% African American, 0.0% Native American, 1.5% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 0.5% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 2.6% of the population.

There were 3,303 households, out of which 40.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.4% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 14.5% were non-families. 18.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 29.0% under the age of 19, 6.4% from 20 to 29, 10.2% from 30 to 39, 20.6% from 40 to 49, 23.7% from 50 to 64, and 5.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.5 years.

Economic figures [7] for the town include a median income for a household at $105,250, and the median income for a family at $114,544. About 2.3% of families have incomes under $15,000/year and 11.9% of families have incomes over $200,000/year.

Government and politics

Voter registration and party enrollment as of October 29, 2019[8]
Party Active voters Inactive voters Total voters Percentage
Republican 1,709 233 1,942 29.15%
Democratic 1,559 191 1,750 26.26%
Unaffiliated 2,326 537 2,863 42.97%
Minor parties 92 16 108 1.62%
Total 5,686 977 6,663 100%
Burlington town vote
by party in presidential elections[9][10]
Year Democratic Republican Third Parties
2020 49.72% 3,099 48.68% 3,034 1.60% 100
2016 43.68% 2,352 51.49% 2,773 4.83% 260
2012 46.23% 2,357 52.63% 2,683 1.14% 58
2008 52.08% 2,716 46.14% 2,406 1.78% 93
2004 48.84% 2,501 49.58% 2,539 1.58% 81
2000 49.26% 2,137 45.30% 1,965 5.44% 236
1996 45.51% 1,747 40.32% 1,548 14.17% 544
1992 37.03% 1,511 35.73% 1,458 27.25% 1,112
1988 44.07% 1,413 54.96% 1,762 0.97% 31
1984 33.84% 994 65.99% 1,938 0.17% 5
1980 35.81% 953 47.69% 1,269 16.50% 439
1976 45.08% 972 54.55% 1,176 0.37% 8
1972 38.53% 722 60.09% 1,126 1.39% 26
1968 43.81% 648 46.65% 690 9.54% 141
1964 66.26% 860 33.74% 438 0.00% 0
1960 48.28% 644 51.72% 690 0.00% 0
1956 30.35% 305 69.65% 700 0.00% 0

Schools

Regional School District #10 serves the Connecticut towns of Burlington and Harwinton and was established in 1962. The four schools of the district, Lewis S. Mills High School, Har-Bur Middle School, Lake Garda School and Harwinton Consolidated School, have a total enrollment of more than 2800 students.

Notable locations

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-08-20. Retrieved 2012-01-27.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Census - Geography Profile: Burlington town, Hartford County, Connecticut". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 26, 2021.
  3. ^ De Forest, John W. History of the Indians of Connecticut from the Earliest Known Period to 1850. Hartford: Wm. J. Hamersley, 1852.
  4. ^ The Connecticut Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly. Connecticut Magazine Company. 1903. p. 331.
  5. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Burlington town, Hartford County, Connecticut". American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  6. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  7. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 25, 2015.
  8. ^ "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 29, 2019" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  9. ^ "General Elections Statement of Vote 1922".
  10. ^ "Election Night Reporting". CT Secretary of State. Retrieved December 17, 2020.
  11. ^ "Town of Burlington, Connecticut". Archived from the original on 2015-09-16. Retrieved 2015-10-26.