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Duck Dodgers
Genre
Based onDuck Dodgers in the 24½th Century
by Michael Maltese
Developed bySpike Brandt
Tony Cervone

Paul Dini
Tom Minton
Directed bySpike Brandt
Tony Cervone
Voices of
Theme music composerWayne Coyne
Steven Drozd
Opening theme"Duck Dodgers", performed by Tom Jones and The Flaming Lips
Ending theme"Duck Dodgers" (Instrumental)
ComposersRobert Kral
Douglas Romayne
Country of originUnited States
Original languageEnglish
No. of seasons3
No. of episodes39 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producers
Producers
EditorRob Desales
Running time22 minutes
Production companyWarner Bros. Animation
DistributorWarner Bros. Television Distribution
Release
Original networkCartoon Network
Audio formatDolby Digital 5.1
Original releaseAugust 23, 2003 (2003-08-23) –
November 11, 2005 (2005-11-11)

Duck Dodgers is an American animated television series, based on the 1953 theatrical cartoon short Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century, produced by Warner Bros. Animation from 2003 to 2005.[1] The series is comic science fiction, featuring the fictional Looney Tunes characters in metafictional roles, with Daffy Duck as the title character. It originally aired on Cartoon Network and Boomerang.[2]

Concept

Though primarily based around the original Duck Dodgers short (which is set in roughly 2350 AD), the series has also taken many visual and thematic cues from other Looney Tunes shorts unrelated to the Dodgers character and its science fiction premise.[3]

Many other familiar characters from the Looney Tunes pantheon are featured in the series, often given traits to fit within Duck Dodgers' own universe. For example, Yosemite Sam becomes "K'chutha Sa'am," a parody of Klingons in Star Trek, Elmer Fudd becomes a parasitic mind-altering alien disease known as "the Fudd" (a combination of the Flood and the Borg), Witch Hazel was "Leezah the Wicked" in one episode, Count Bloodcount was "Count Muerte" in two episodes, and Wile E. Coyote was a Predator-like alien hunter in one episode where Martian Commander X-2 and K-9 were hunting. Gophers Mac and Tosh appeared as Martian gophers on an alien golf course. Nasty Canasta, Taz, Rocky and Mugsy, and the Crusher also made appearances on this series. In a two-part episode, the "Shropshire Slasher" appears as a convict named the Andromeda Annihilator. Michigan J. Frog was the host of a talent show and Ralph Phillips played Babyface Moonbeam. Egghead Junior also appeared, as well as the unnamed evil scientist who owned Gossamer.

Theme songs

In addition to pop culture references, the show's theme (arranged by the Flaming Lips) is sung by Tom Jones, in a style reminiscent of the theme from the James Bond film Thunderball.[4] Jones also appeared in caricature form in the second-season episode "Talent Show A Go-Go," to sing his signature song, "It's Not Unusual". Dave Mustaine of the thrash metal band Megadeth was featured in the third-season episode "In Space, No One Can Hear You Rock", with the band performing the song "Back in the Day" from their 2004 album The System Has Failed.

Accolades

Duck Dodgers was nominated in 2004 Annie Award for Outstanding Achievement in an Animated Television Production Produced For Children, Music in an Animated Television Production, Production Design in an Animated Television Production, and Voice Acting in an Animated Television Production. It won the Annie award for 2004 for Music in an Animated Television Production, music by Robert J. Kral. It was also nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Sound Editing – Live Action and Animation and Special Class Animated Program in 2004,[5] and again in 2005.[6] It later won for Outstanding Performer in an Animated ProgramJoe Alaskey.[7] The series ended production in 2005 after its third season.

Characters

Main article: List of Duck Dodgers characters

Galactic Protectorate

The Martian Empire

Episode list

Main article: List of Duck Dodgers episodes

SeasonEpisodesOriginally aired
First airedLast aired
113August 23, 2003 (2003-08-23)November 18, 2003 (2003-11-18)
213August 14, 2004 (2004-08-14)February 25, 2005 (2005-02-25)
313March 11, 2005 (2005-03-11)November 11, 2005 (2005-11-11)

Voice cast

Home media

Warner Home Video released Duck Dodgers – The Complete First Season: Dark Side of the Duck to DVD on February 19, 2013, Duck Dodgers – The Complete Second Season: Deep Space Duck on July 23, 2013 and Duck Dodgers - The Complete Third Season on January 28, 2020.

Season Title Episodes Release date
1 The Complete First Season: Dark Side of the Duck 13 February 19, 2013
2 The Complete Second Season: Deep Space Duck July 23, 2013
3 The Complete Third Season January 28, 2020

See also

References

  1. ^ "FOR YOUNG VIEWERS; The First Duck in Space? That Is So Daffy". The New York Times. 2003-09-21. Retrieved 2010-10-20.
  2. ^ Erickson, Hal (2005). Television Cartoon Shows: An Illustrated Encyclopedia, 1949 Through 2003 (2nd ed.). McFarland & Co. pp. 290–291. ISBN 978-1476665993.
  3. ^ Perlmutter, David (2018). The Encyclopedia of American Animated Television Shows. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 169–170. ISBN 978-1538103739.
  4. ^ Mallory, Michael (Aug 22, 2003). "They dare to 'Duck'". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  5. ^ "The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Announced for the 31st Annual Daytime Emmy® Awards" (PDF). The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved March 4, 2004.
  6. ^ "The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Announced for the 32nd Annual Daytime Emmy® Awards" (PDF). The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Archived from the original on April 15, 2012. Retrieved March 2, 2005.
  7. ^ "The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Announces Winners for the 31st Annual Daytime Creative Arts Emmy® Awards" (PDF). The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved May 15, 2004.