Enga Sign Language
Native toPapua New Guinea
RegionUpper Lagaip Valley, Enga Province
EthnicityTato Enga
Language codes
ISO 639-3None (mis)
Glottologenga1253

Enga Sign Language is an apparent village sign language among the Tato Enga people in Enga province, Papua New Guinea. It was reported in 1980 in three articles by Adam Kendon, based on ethnographic films of three signers (one deaf, two hearing) in the upper valley of the Lagaip River, but with reports of wider use in the surrounding region.[1][2][3] Its current status is unknown, as no more recent information is available.

References

  1. ^ Kendon, Adam (1980). "A description of a deaf-mute sign language from the Enga Province of Papua New Guinea with some comparative discussion, Part I: The formational properties of Enga signs". Semiotica. 31 (1/2): 1–34.
  2. ^ Kendon, Adam (1980). "A description of a deaf-mute sign language from the Enga Province of Papua New Guinea with some comparative discussion, Part II: The semiotic functioning of Enga signs". Semiotica. 32 (1/2): 81–117.
  3. ^ Kendon, Adam (1980). "A description of a deaf-mute sign language from the Enga Province of Papua New Guinea with some comparative discussion, Part III: Aspects of utterance construction". Semiotica. 32 (3/4): 245–313.