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Ferdinand Charles
Portrait by Frans Luycx, c. 1648
Archduke of Further Austria
Reign13 September 1632 – 30 December 1662
PredecessorLeopold V
SuccessorSigismund Francis
RegentClaudia de' Medici (1632-1646)
Born(1628-05-17)May 17, 1628
Archduchy of Austria, Holy Roman Empire
DiedDecember 30, 1662(1662-12-30) (aged 34)
Kaltern, County of Tyrol, Holy Roman Empire
Spouse
(m. 1646)
IssueClaudia Felicitas, Holy Roman Empress
HouseHabsburg
FatherLeopold V, Archduke of Austria
MotherClaudia de' Medici
ReligionRoman Catholicism

Ferdinand Charles (17 May 1628 – 30 December 1662) was the Archduke of Further Austria, including Tyrol, from 1646 to 1662.

As the son of Archduke Leopold V and Claudia de' Medici, he succeeded his father upon the latter's death in 1632, under his mother's regency. He took over his mother's governatorial duties when he came of age in 1646. To finance his extravagant living style, he sold goods and entitlements. For example, he wasted the exorbitant sum which France had to pay to the Tyrolean Habsburgs for the cession of their fiefs west of the Rhine (Alsace, Sundgau and Breisach). He also fixed the border to Graubünden in 1652.[1]

Ferdinand Charles was an absolutist ruler, did not call any diet after 1648 and had his chancellor Wilhelm Biener executed illegally in 1651 after a secret trial. On the other hand, he was a lover of music: Italian opera was performed in his court.

Marriage, children and death

Ferdinand Charles married Anna de' Medici. She was a daughter of Cosimo II de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany and Maria Magdalena of Austria († 1631). They had three children:

He died in Kaltern.

Ancestors

Male-line family tree

References

  1. ^ Tyler, James (2011). A guide to playing the baroque guitar. Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0-253-00501-4. OCLC 710841731.
  2. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin von, ed. (1860). "Habsburg, Leopold V." . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). Vol. 6. p. 416 – via Wikisource.
  3. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin von, ed. (1860). "Habsburg, Claudia von Florenz" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). Vol. 6. p. 159 – via Wikisource.
  4. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin von, ed. (1860). "Habsburg, Karl II. von Steiermark" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). Vol. 6. p. 352 – via Wikisource.
  5. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin von, ed. (1861). "Habsburg, Maria von Bayern" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). Vol. 7. p. 20 – via Wikisource.
  6. ^ a b c d "The Medici Granducal Archive" (PDF). The Medici Archive Project. pp. 12–13. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 April 2005. Retrieved 28 August 2018.
  7. ^ a b "Christine of Lorraine (c. 1571–1637)". Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia. Gale Research. 2002. Retrieved 28 August 2018.
  8. ^ Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor at the Encyclopædia Britannica
  9. ^ a b Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor at the Encyclopædia Britannica
  10. ^ a b Obermayer-Marnach, Eva (1953), "Anna Jagjello", Neue Deutsche Biographie (in German), vol. 1, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, p. 299; (full text online)
  11. ^ a b Goetz, Walter (1953), "Albrecht V.", Neue Deutsche Biographie (in German), vol. 1, Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, pp. 158–160; (full text online)
  12. ^ a b Wurzbach, Constantin von, ed. (1860). "Habsburg, Anna von Oesterreich (1528–1587)" . Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich [Biographical Encyclopedia of the Austrian Empire] (in German). Vol. 6. p. 151 – via Wikisource.
  13. ^ a b Cesati, Franco (1999). Medici. Firenze: La Mandragora. p. 75. ISBN 88-85957-36-6.
  14. ^ a b "Christina of Denmark (1521–1590)". Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia. Gale Research. 2002. Retrieved 28 August 2018.
  15. ^ a b "Medici, Catherine de (1519–1589)". Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia. Gale Research. 2002. Retrieved 28 August 2018.
Regnal titles Preceded byLeopold V Archduke of Further Austria 1632–1662 Succeeded bySigismund Francis