Football League First Division
Organising bodyThe Football League
Founded17 April 1888
Folded2004
CountryEngland
Other club(s) fromWales
Number of teams24 (1992–2004)
Level on pyramid1 (1888–1992)
2 (1992–2004)
Promotion toPremier League
(1992–2004)
Relegation toSecond Division
Domestic cup(s)FA Cup FA Community Shield
League cup(s)League Cup
International cup(s)European Cup
(1956–1985, 1991–1992)
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup
(1960–1985, 1990–1999)
UEFA Cup
(1971–1985, 1990–2004)
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup
(1955–1971)
Last championsLeeds United (1st tier)
(1991–92)
Norwich City (2nd tier)
(2003–04)
Most championshipsLiverpool
(18 titles)
Most appearancesPeter Shilton (849)
Top goalscorerJimmy Greaves (357)

The Football League First Division was a division of the Football League in England from 1888 until 2004. It was the top division in the English football league system from the season 1888–89 until 1991–92, a century in which the First Division's winning club became English men's football champions.

The First Division contained between 12 and 24 clubs, playing each other home and away in a double round robin. The competition was based on two points for a win from 1888 until the increase to three points for a win in 1981.

After the creation of the Premier League, the name First Division was given to the second-tier division (from 1992). The name ceased to exist after the 2003–04 First Division season. The division was rebranded as the Football League Championship (now EFL Championship).

History

Further information: Football in England and History of English football

The Football League was founded in 1888 by Aston Villa director William McGregor. It originally consisted of a single division of 12 clubs (Accrington, Aston Villa, Blackburn Rovers, Bolton Wanderers, Burnley, Derby County, Everton, Notts County, Preston North End, Stoke (now Stoke City), West Bromwich Albion and Wolverhampton Wanderers), known as The Football League. When the League admitted additional members from the rival Football Alliance in 1892, it was split into two divisions.

For the next 100 years, the First Division was the top professional league in English football. In 1992 the 22 clubs making up the First Division elected to resign from the Football League and set up the Premier League. The Football League was consequently re-organised, with the Second, Third and Fourth Divisions renamed the First, Second and Third respectively. Thus, the First Division, while still the top level of the Football League became the second level of the entire English football league system.

The First Division was renamed the Football League Championship prior to the start of the 2004–05 season, as part of a league-wide rebrand. The Football League rebranded itself as the English Football League prior to the 2016–17 season, with its top level becoming the EFL Championship at that time.

Liverpool were the most frequent winners of the First Division when it was the top flight of English football, winning it a total of 18 times.

Trophy and players' medals

The Football League First Division trophy was first awarded in 1891, and was presented to the winners through to 1992.[1]

As of the 1947–48 season, making seven appearances for their club during the season was not enough for a player to qualify for a winners medal.[2]

As of the 1975–76 season, players had to make 14 appearances for their club during the season in order to qualify for a winners medal.[3]

First Division champions (top division era:1888–1992)

This article is missing information about several seasons. Please expand the article to include this information. Further details may exist on the talk page. (January 2022)

See also: List of English football champions and List of winners of the EFL Championship and predecessors

Football League First Division Champions
Club Titles Winning seasons
Liverpool
18
1900-01, 1905-06, 1921-22, 1922-23, 1946–47, 1963–64, 1965–66, 1972–73, 1975–76, 1976–77, 1978–79, 1979–80, 1981–82, 1982–83, 1983–84, 1985–86, 1987–88, 1989–90
Arsenal
10
1930–31, 1932–33, 1933–34, 1934–35, 1937–38, 1947–48, 1952–53, 1970–71, 1988–89, 1990–91
Everton
9
1890-91, 1914-15, 1927-28, 1931-32, 1938-39, 1962-63, 1969-70, 1984-85, 1986-87
Manchester United
7

1907–08, 1910–11, 1951–52, 1955–56, 1956–57, 1964–65, 1966–67

Aston Villa
7
1893–94, 1895–96, 1896–97, 1898–99, 1899–1900, 1909–10, 1980–81
Sunderland
6
1891–92, 1892–93, 1894–95, 1901–02, 1912–13, 1935–36
Sheffield Wednesday
4

1902–03, 1903–04, 1928–29, 1929–30

Newcastle United
4
1904–05, 1906–07, 1908–09, 1926–27
Leeds United
3
1968–69, 1973–74, 1991–92
Wolverhampton Wanderers
3
1953–54, 1957–58, 1958–59
Huddersfield Town
3

1923–24, 1924–25, 1925–26

Derby County
2
1971–72, 1974–75
Manchester City
2
1936–37, 1967–68
Tottenham Hotspur
2
1950–51, 1960–61
Burnley
2
1920–21, 1959–60
Portsmouth
2
1948–49, 1949–50
Blackburn Rovers
2
1911–12, 1913–14
Preston North End
2
1888–89, 1889–90
Nottingham Forest
1
1977–78
Ipswich Town
1
1961–62
Chelsea
1
1954–55
West Bromwich Albion
1
1919–20
Sheffield United
1
1897–98

First Division all time top scorers

Rank Player Years Goals Matches Ratio Club(s)
1 England Jimmy Greaves 1957–1972 357 516 0.69 Chelsea, Tottenham Hotspur, West Ham
2 England Steve Bloomer 1892–1914 314 536 0.59 Derby County, Middlesbrough
3 England Dixie Dean 1924–1938 310 362 0.86 Everton
4 England Gordon Hodgson 1925–1940 287 456 0.63 Liverpool, Aston Villa, Leeds United
5 England Charlie Buchan 1912–1928 258 482 0.53 Sunderland, Arsenal
6 England David Jack 1920–1934 257 476 0.54 Bolton Wanderers, Arsenal
7 England Nat Lofthouse 1946–1960 255 452 0.56 Bolton Wanderers
8 England Joe Bradford 1921–1935 248 410 0.60 Birmingham City
9 ScotlandHughie Gallacher 1925–1938 246 355 0.69 Newcastle United, Chelsea, Derby County, Notts County
10 England Joe Smith 1908–1927 243 410 0.59 Bolton Wanderers

References

  1. ^ "Football League First Division Trophy, 1890". National Football Museum. Retrieved 28 May 2020.
  2. ^ "Player profile: Bryn Jones". Arsenal player database. Arsenal FC. Archived from the original on 13 October 2012. Retrieved 13 June 2011.
  3. ^ "Joey Jones: Profile". Liverpool FC. Archived from the original on 6 February 2011. Retrieved 20 May 2011.
  4. ^ "The Football League". 17 July 2014. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014.