Gate Studios
Borehamwood, Gate Studios from Station Road - geograph.org.uk - 746323.jpg
The former Gate Studios in 2004, before demolition in 2006
Former names
  • Whitehall Studios
  • Consolidated Studios
  • J.H. Studios
  • M.P. Studios
Alternative namesStation Road Studios
General information
TypeFilm studios
AddressStation Road, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire
CountryUnited Kingdom
Coordinates51°39′13″N 0°16′45″W / 51.6537°N 0.2791°W / 51.6537; -0.2791Coordinates: 51°39′13″N 0°16′45″W / 51.6537°N 0.2791°W / 51.6537; -0.2791
Inaugurated1928 (1928)
Demolished2006 (2006)
Owner
  • Whitehall Films Ltd (1928–1930)
  • Consolidated Films (1934–1935)
  • Julius Hagen (1935–1937)
  • M.P. Productions (1937)
  • J. Arthur Rank (1950-1957)
  • Harkness Screens (1957-2004)

Gate Studios was one of the many studios also known as "Elstree Studios" in the town of Borehamwood, England. Opened in 1928, the studios were in use until the early 1950s.[1] The studios had previously been known as Whitehall Studios, Consolidated Studios, J.H. Studios and M.P. Studios.[2]

History

A single large stage was built in Station Road, Borehamwood, in 1928 by Whitehall Films Ltd, but the company was wound up in 1930, and its studio sold to Audible Filmcraft, who, in turn, crashed in August 1932. Consolidated Film Studios took over the lease in November 1933, then Independent Producers Studios acquired the studio in July 1935.In November 1935, Julius Hagen, the owner of Twickenham Studios, bought the site and formed a new company, J.H. Studios.[3]

Financial difficulties forced Hagen to sell the studios to M.P. Productions in 1937. The studios were acquired by the Anglo-American Film Corporation in September 1938.[3]

During World War II, the studio was used by the government for storage.

In 1950, the site was bought by J. Arthur Rank, who renamed it Gate Studios and made religious films.

The last film produced was John Wesley in 1954,[2] and the site was sold to Andrew Harkness, a manufacturer of cinema screens.[4] Harkness Screens moved out of the site in 2004 having established a global manufacturing base in France and the US and relocated its UK operation to a new production facility in Stevenage. The building in Borehamwood was demolished in 2006 to make way for 133 new properties, the development being named Gate Studios in homage to the former site.[5]

Films shot at the studios

Whitehall Studios

The following films were shot at Whitehall Studios.[3]

J.H. Studios

The following films were shot at J.H. Studios.[3]

M.P. Studios

The following films were shot at M.P. Studios.[3]

Gate Studios

The following films were shot at Gate Studios.

See also

References

  1. ^ Patricia Warren, Elstree, the British Hollywood, Publisher Elm Tree Books, 1983, ISBN 0-241-10955-8, ISBN 978-0-241-10955-7, 184 pages (page 18)
  2. ^ a b "Gate Studios", BFI Film & TV Database website, retrieved 17 Dec 2011
  3. ^ a b c d e Wood, Linda (2009) [1st pub. 1986]. British Films 1927 - 1939 (PDF). London: BFI Library Services. Retrieved 21 January 2022.
  4. ^ Chris Dry, Film and television in education: the handbook of the British Universities Film & Video, Edition 2, Publisher Routledge, 1995, ISBN 1-85713-016-2, ISBN 978-1-85713-016-4, 341 pages (page 275)
  5. ^ "Final curtain falls at the historic Gate Studios", Watford Observer, Thu 9 Feb 1996
  6. ^ "Under the Frozen Falls (1948)". BFI. British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  7. ^ "The Lost People (1949)". BFI. British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  8. ^ "Odette (1950)". BFI. British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  9. ^ "Lilli Marlene (1951)". BFI. British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  10. ^ "The Happy Family (1952)". BFI. British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  11. ^ "The Promise (1952)". BFI. British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  12. ^ "Women of Twilight (1953)". BFI. British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  13. ^ "Street Corner (1953)". BFI. British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  14. ^ "Innocents in Paris (1953)". BFI. British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  15. ^ "John Wesley (1953)". BFI. British Film Institute. Retrieved 22 January 2022.