Goh V Shem
Goh V Shem - Indonesia Masters 2018.jpg
Goh during the 2018 Indonesia Masters
Personal information
Birth nameGoh Wei Shem
CountryMalaysia
Born (1989-05-20) 20 May 1989 (age 32)
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Height1.79 m (5 ft 10 in)
Weight70 kg (154 lb)
Years active2007–present
HandednessRight
CoachCheah Soon Kit
Men's doubles
Tournaments played515 (330 wins–185 losses)
Highest ranking1 (with Tan Wee Kiong) (7 November 2016)
Current ranking14 (with Tan Wee Kiong)(21 December 2021)
364 (with Low Juan Shen) (26 October 2021)
BWF profile
Goh V Shem
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese吴蔚昇
Hanyu PinyinWú Wèishēng
Hokkien POJGô͘ Ùiseng
Birth name
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese吴伟申
Hanyu PinyinWú Wĕishēn
Hokkien POJGô͘ Úisin

Goh V Shem AMN (吴蔚昇; born Goh Wei Shem, 20 May 1989) is a Malaysian badminton player in the doubles event. He was partnered with Tan Wee Kiong after their outstanding performance at the 2014 Thomas Cup. Together, Goh and Tan won the gold medal for the men's doubles event at the 2014 Commonwealth Games as well as all their matches in the mixed team event, helping Malaysia retain the gold medal for the third consecutive time. They also won the bronze medal at the 2014 Asian Games and the silver medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics, thus making them the second ever Malaysian men's doubles pair to win the silver medal at the Olympic Games 20 years after the feat was achieved by Cheah Soon Kit and Yap Kim Hock in 1996 Atlanta. Goh and Tan are also the fourth Malaysian men's doubles pair to hold the world number 1 ranking after Cheah and Yap followed by Chan Chong Ming and Chew Choon Eng, and later on by Koo Kien Keat and Tan Boon Heong ever since official rankings were kept in the 80s.[1]

Goh is known for his offensive play style and his signature jumping smash. He would stand ready at the back while his partner guards the front, jumping when the opportunity arrives and delivering steep smashes towards the opponent.

Commonwealth Games 2014 badminton double final
Commonwealth Games 2014 badminton double final

Background

Goh was born in Kuala Lumpur. Later on for good luck he changed his Chinese birth name (吴伟申) to one with a different pronunciation (吴蔚昇), while also changing the spelling of his name in English from Wei Shem to V Shem. The V stands for 'Victory'.[2][3]

Career

Goh represented Malaysia at the 2007 BWF World Junior Championships with Ong Jian Guo where they took the bronze medal.

In 2011, Goh took the men's doubles bronze medal with Lim Khim Wah at the 2011 Southeast Asian Games. In late 2012, Goh was scratch partnered with Teo Ee Yi. They won the 2012 Malaysia International. Then for a brief period of time, Goh was once again partnered with Ong Jian Guo. They were semifinalists at the 2012 Korea Grand Prix Gold after being defeated by Ko Sung-hyun and Lee Yong-dae.

In 2013, Goh resumed his partnership with Lim. They became bronze medalists at the Asian Championships and won their first tournament together at the Malaysia Grand Prix Gold after defeating teammates and top seeds, Koo Kien Keat and Tan Boon Heong in the finals. They qualified for the World Championships but were defeated in the second round by compatriots, Hoon Thien How and Tan Wee Kiong. In mid 2013, Goh briefly partnered Teo Kok Siang. They won the bronze medal at the Southeast Asian Games but their partnership was cut short when Teo suffered an injury from a car accident.

2014: Partnership with Tan Wee Kiong

Goh and Lim's partnership was once again resumed in 2014. They won their first Superseries tournament at the Malaysia Open after defeating China's Chai Biao and Hong Wei in the final. At the Malaysia Grand Prix Gold, they were runners-up after being defeated by Danny Bawa Chrisnanta and Chayut Triyachart of Singapore in the final. Goh played his last tournament with Lim at the 2014 BWF World Championships in September. During the second round match against Lee Sheng-mu and Tsai Chia-hsin of Chinese Taipei, Goh and Lim retired injured as Goh began suffering from backpains mid game.

In May 2014, Goh was scratch partnered with Tan Wee Kiong to play second men's doubles at the 2014 Thomas Cup. They won all four matches that they contested and defeated several highly ranked shuttlers along the way despite this being the first time that the two has played together internationally. Their debut partnership at the Thomas Cup was widely praised. Malaysia made it to the finals for the first time in 12 years but was narrowly defeated by Japan with a score of 2–3.

In August, they represented Malaysia at the 2014 Glasgow Commonwealth Games. They went on to take the gold medal and were the only medalists in the tournament who were not seeded. En route to the gold medal, they defeated top seeds, Chris Adcock and Andrew Ellis of England in the semifinals as well as 3rd seeds, Danny Bawa Chrisnanta and Chayut Triyachart of Singapore in the finals. They also won all five matches they contested in the mixed team event, helping Malaysia secure her third consecutive mixed team gold medal at the Commonwealth Games.

Following the World Championships in September, Goh and Tan have been officially partnered. They represented Malaysia at the 2014 Asian Games where they made it to semifinals but were once again defeated by top seeds, Lee Yong-dae and Yoo Yeon-seong of South Korea. The defeat automatically earned them the bronze medal as there is no bronze medal playoffs in badminton at the Asian Games. En route to the semifinals, they defeated 5th seeds, Lee Sheng-mu and Tsai Chia-hsin of Chinese Taipei in the first round and 3rd seeds, Hiroyuki Endo and Kenichi Hayakawa of Japan in the quarterfinals with a score of 21–16, 21–16.

2015

In January 2015, Goh and Tan were semifinalists at the Malaysia Masters. In March, they became runners-up to Cai Yun and Lu Kai of China at the Swiss Open with a score of 19–21, 21-14, 17-21. At the 2015 Sudirman Cup in May, Goh and Tan managed to upset the World No.1 pairing of Lee and Yoo in the first group tie against South Korea. They also defeated the pairing of Manu Attri and B. Sumeeth Reddy in the second group tie against India. Malaysia topped Group D and were drawn against South Korea once again in the quarterfinals but failed to advance. They were then runners-up at the Russian Open. At the 2015 BWF World Championships in August, Tan and Goh defeated defending champions Ko Sung-hyun and Shin Baek-cheol of South Korea in the second round but were defeated in the third round. In December, Goh and Tan won the U.S. Grand Prix.

2016: Olympics silver

In 2016, Goh and Tan won their first title together at the Syed Modi International. They then became beaten semifinalists at the All England Open and the India Superseries. At the Thomas Cup, Goh won three out of his five matches played. Malaysia made it to the semifinals but lost to eventual winners Denmark.

Goh and Tan qualified for their first Olympics at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They won all their matches in the group stage to top group B. They defeated 4th seeds Fu Haifeng and Zhang Nan in the group stage, top seeds Lee Yong-dae and Yoo Yeon-seong in the quarterfinals and 5th seeds Chai Biao and Hong Wei in the semifinals to once again face Fu and Zhang in the finals but this time falling short with a score of 21–16, 11–21, 21–23, taking home silver.

In October, Goh and Tan made it to the semifinals of the Korea Open. In the same year, they won their first Superseries tournament title as a pair at the Denmark Open. In December, Goh and Tan won the Dubai World Superseries Finals. Thus, they have now succeeded the achievements by their seniors, Koo Kien Keat and Tan Boon Heong, who were also among the best men's doubles pair in the long history of Malaysian badminton.

Achievements

Olympic Games

Men's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2016 Riocentro - Pavilion 4, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong China Fu Haifeng
China Zhang Nan
21–16, 11–21, 21–23
Silver medal.svg
Silver

Commonwealth Games

Men's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2014 Emirates Arena,
Glasgow, Scotland
Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong Singapore Danny Bawa Chrisnanta
Singapore Chayut Triyachart
21–12, 12–21, 21–15
Gold
Gold
2018 Carrara Sports and Leisure Centre,
Gold Coast, Australia
Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong Sri Lanka Sachin Dias
Sri Lanka Buwaneka Goonethilleka
21–8, 21–13
Bronze
Bronze

Asian Games

Men's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2014 Gyeyang Gymnasium,
Incheon, South Korea
Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong South Korea Lee Yong-dae
South Korea Yoo Yeon-seong
6–21, 15–21
Bronze
Bronze

Southeast Asian Games

Men's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2011 Istora Gelora Bung Karno,
Jakarta, Indonesia
Malaysia Lim Khim Wah Indonesia Markis Kido
Indonesia Hendra Setiawan
13–21, 21–17, 19–21
Bronze
Bronze
2013 Wunna Theikdi Indoor Stadium,
Naypyidaw, Myanmar
Malaysia Teo Kok Siang Indonesia Berry Angriawan
Indonesia Ricky Karanda Suwardi
17–21, 18–21
Bronze
Bronze

Asian Championships

Men's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2013 Taipei Arena,
Taipei, Taiwan
Malaysia Lim Khim Wah South Korea Ko Sung-hyun
South Korea Lee Yong-dae
17–21, 16–21
Bronze
Bronze

BWF World Junior Championships

Boys' doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result
2007 The Trusts Stadium,
Waitakere City, New Zealand
Malaysia Ong Jian Guo China Chai Biao
China Li Tian
12–21, 16–21
Bronze
Bronze

BWF World Tour (2 titles, 3 runners-up)

The BWF World Tour, which was announced on 19 March 2017 and implemented in 2018,[4] is a series of elite badminton tournaments sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF). The BWF World Tours are divided into levels of World Tour Finals, Super 1000, Super 750, Super 500, Super 300 (part of the HSBC World Tour), and the BWF Tour Super 100.[5]

Men's doubles

Year Tournament Level Partner Opponent Score Result
2018 Malaysia Masters Super 500 Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong Indonesia Fajar Alfian
Indonesia Muhammad Rian Ardianto
21–14, 22–24, 13–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2019 Thailand Masters Super 300 Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong Chinese Taipei Lu Ching-yao
Chinese Taipei Yang Po-han
21–13, 21–17 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2019 Chinese Taipei Open Super 300 Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong South Korea Choi Sol-gyu
South Korea Seo Seung-jae
21–19, 15–21, 23–21 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2019 Korea Masters Super 300 Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong Chinese Taipei Lee Yang
Chinese Taipei Wang Chi-lin
19–21, 22–20, 19–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2020 (I) Thailand Open Super 1000 Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong Chinese Taipei Lee Yang
Chinese Taipei Wang Chi-lin
16–21, 23–21, 19–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up

BWF Superseries (3 titles)

The BWF Superseries, which was launched on 14 December 2006 and implemented in 2007,[6] was a series of elite badminton tournaments, sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF). BWF Superseries levels were Superseries and Superseries Premier. A season of Superseries consisted of twelve tournaments around the world that had been introduced since 2011.[7] Successful players were invited to the Superseries Finals, which were held at the end of each year.

Men's doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2014 Malaysia Open Malaysia Lim Khim Wah China Chai Biao
China Hong Wei
21–19, 21–18 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2016 Denmark Open Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong Thailand Bodin Isara
Thailand Nipitphon Puangpuapech
14–21, 22–20, 21–19 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2016 Dubai World Superseries Finals Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong Japan Takeshi Kamura
Japan Keigo Sonoda
21–14, 21–19 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
  BWF Superseries Finals tournament
  BWF Superseries Premier tournament
  BWF Superseries tournament

BWF Grand Prix (3 titles, 3 runners-up)

The BWF Grand Prix had two levels, the Grand Prix and Grand Prix Gold. It was a series of badminton tournaments sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF) and played between 2007 and 2017.

Men's doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2013 Malaysia Grand Prix Gold Malaysia Lim Khim Wah Malaysia Koo Kien Keat
Malaysia Tan Boon Heong
22–20, 21–15 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2014 Malaysia Grand Prix Gold Malaysia Lim Khim Wah Singapore Danny Bawa Chrisnanta
Singapore Chayut Triyachart
17–21, 20–22 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2015 Swiss Open Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong China Cai Yun
China Lu Kai
19–21, 21–14, 17–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2015 Russian Open Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong Russia Vladimir Ivanov
Russia Ivan Sozonov
20–22, 19–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2015 U.S. Grand Prix Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong Russia Vladimir Ivanov
Russia Ivan Sozonov
21–14, 21–17 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2016 Syed Modi International Malaysia Tan Wee Kiong India Pranaav Jerry Chopra
India Akshay Dewalkar
14–21, 24–22, 21–8 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
  BWF Grand Prix Gold tournament
  BWF Grand Prix tournament

BWF International Challenge/Series (4 titles)

Men's doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result
2008 Malaysia International Malaysia Lin Woon Fui Malaysia Gan Teik Chai
Malaysia Ong Jian Guo
21–19, 21–18 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2010 Vietnam International Malaysia Teo Kok Siang South Korea Kim Ki-jung
South Korea Shin Baek-cheol
21–23, 21–17, 21–19 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2010 Malaysia International Malaysia Lim Khim Wah Indonesia Rahmat Adianto
Indonesia Andrei Adistia
21–15, 21–16 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
2012 Malaysia International Malaysia Teo Ee Yi Malaysia Low Juan Shen
Malaysia Tan Yip Jiun
21–15, 21–12 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner
  BWF International Challenge tournament
  BWF International Series tournament

Honours

Honours of Malaysia

References

  1. ^ Fabian Peter (10 November 2016). "(Badminton) V Shem-Wee Kiong are officially World No 1!". New Straits Times. Retrieved 22 August 2017.
  2. ^ "'V' is for Victory in shuttler Goh's name". The Star. 20 July 2014. Retrieved 12 January 2019.
  3. ^ 【里约奥运】马国羽球男双打爆“大”哥靠计八字. Oriental Daily. 16 August 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2017.
  4. ^ Alleyne, Gayle (19 March 2017). "BWF Launches New Events Structure". Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 1 December 2017. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  5. ^ Sukumar, Dev (10 January 2018). "Action-Packed Season Ahead!". Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 13 January 2018. Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  6. ^ "BWF Launches Super Series". Badminton Australia. 15 December 2006. Archived from the original on 6 October 2007.
  7. ^ "Yonex All England Elevated To BWF Premier Super Series Event". IBadmintonstore. Archived from the original on 2 October 2013. Retrieved 29 September 2013.
  8. ^ Rajes Paul (10 September 2017). "Chong Wei all fired up". The Star. Retrieved 28 July 2018.